Tag: 2019年爱上海419

Supermen Living in Nepal

first_imgThere is a race of people at the base of Mt. Everest capable of feats that defy scientific explanation: the Sherpas.  They can carry up to twice their body weight under three hostile conditions that would wear out most of us in a minute: (1) high altitude, (2) long distance, and (3) steep inclines.  Somehow, the techniques they use and the adaptations their bodies have made from living in that environment have made them the supreme load carriers of the human world (they even beat out African women who routinely carry heavy loads on top of their head).  This was the subject of a research paper in Science this week.1  Science Now sums it up:When the going gets tough, the tough use their heads.  Porters around the world carry loads that would floor backpackers by balancing baskets atop their noggins or slinging sacks from their craniums.  Now a new study reveals that Nepalese porters do the job better than anyone else, hefting huge bundles while using relatively little energy.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)The study, also reported by National Geographic News, found that Nepalese porters or sherpas routinely carry double what backpackers carry, under more extreme conditions, yet burn less energy:The town of Namche (at an altitude of 3500 m [11,400 ft]) near Mount Everest hosts a weekly bazaar.  Porters (Fig. 1A), predominantly ethnic Rai, Sherpa, or Tamang, typically take 7 to 9 days to travel to Namche from the Kathmandu valley.  The route, no more than a dirt footpath, covers a horizontal distance of 100 km, with total ascents (river crossings to mountain passes) of 8000 m [5 vertical miles] and total descents of 6300 m [4 vertical miles].    One day before the bazaar, we counted 545 male and 97 female porters (and 32 yaks) en route to Namche; others passed by earlier and later in the darkness.  We weighed randomly selected porters and their loads.  The men carried loads of 93 +- 36% of their Mb (mean +- SD, n = 96 male porters), whereas the women carried 66 +- 21% of their Mb (n = 17 female porters).  The youngest porter was 11 years old, and the oldest 68; the greatest load measured was 183% of Mb, and 20% of the men carried > 125% of their Mb.  More than 30 tons of material were ported to Namche that day.The researchers measured their oxygen intake and carbon dioxide output under controlled conditions, and found that their energy utilization was “far more economical than the control subjects at all loads and more economical than the African women at all except the lightest loads.”  They marveled at watching them in their normal business hauling loads around the mountains.  How they do it is a mystery:The load versus speed versus energy-cost trade-off chosen by these porters is to walk slowly for many hours each day, take frequent rests, and carry the greatest loads possible.  We observed, for example, a group of heavily loaded porters making slow headway up a steep ascent out of a river gorge.  Following whistled commands from their leader, they would take up their loads and labor uphill for no more than 15 s at a time, followed by a 45-s period of rest.  Incredibly, this group of barefoot porters was headed for Tibet, across the Nangpa glacier (altitude 5716 m [18,700 ft]), about another week’s travel beyond Namche.    So how do they do it?  They might reduce the muscular work required to carry a load or increase their overall efficiency.  The actual mechanism is unknown at this time.Many world mountain climbers brag if they make it up Everest, but these sherpas consider such feats all in a day’s work.  National Geographic News adds that after unloading and selling their goods, they race home for more, running down the mountain for two days, even poorly equipped and usually with very bad shoes or none at all.  They usually sleep on the trail, with nothing but rocks for pillows, even in below-freezing temperatures.  Some of their women bring their babies with them.    See also the National Geographic story from May 2002 about the legendary Sherpas of Mt. Everest.  Many of the famous climbing expeditions on the world’s highest mountain could not have succeeded without them, it says.1Bastien et al., “Energetics of Load Carrying in Nepalese Porters,” Science, Vol 308, Issue 5729, 1755 , 17 June 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1111513].Every once in awhile we get glimpses into the suggestion that there is far more potential in the human body than most of us realize.  Those of us who have backpacked in the mountains know the strain of carrying even 40 pounds up a steep mountainside for just a couple of hours, and that at much lower elevations.  The worst feeling at a rest stop is to have some 68-year-old frail-looking grandma with a bigger pack prance right on by saying, “Mighty fine day, is it not?” as you sit there gasping for breath.    Here we see, in Nepal, a community of men, women and children that make the impossible look routine.  They don’t shop at REI and use Patagonia gear or high-tech climbing boots; they don’t compete in the Olympics or win medals, but all of us must regard the way of life of these human mountain goats with admiration.  How much stronger and smarter could our ancestors have been?  A little humility is always in order.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Friday Field Notes

first_imgMoriah Legvold is with the MN National Guard as a Child and Youth Program Coordinator and  has been working with State Family Programs for 3 years. Previously, Moriah was an elementary teacher at Iowa Connections Academy.  She has gained experience and a passion for military youth as a Camp Adventure Counselor on an active duty base in Hawaii during Summer 2010.  She continued her passion volunteering for the Iowa National Guard for 1 ½ years around the time she graduated from college in 2011 with a degree in Elementary Education at William Penn University. In our fourth Friday Field Notes blog post we are highlighting how State Family Programs has partnered with their local cooperative extension at the University of Minnesota to create some diverse youth programming.  As you read this post, consider how your efforts to build community capacity to enhance the resilience and well-being of military families via job and career assistance might benefit  from a collaboration with cooperative extension in your community.We first connected with the University of Minnesota Extension when a grant was funded to help support Military Kids through Operation Military Kids.  Operation Military Kids was established in 2005 in effort to support children of National Guard and Reserve soldiers who are called to active duty.  Operation Military Kids provides a support network to youth and their families by connecting them helpful people and organizations in their hometowns.Our OMK partnership has consisted of developing our MN Military Teen Panel.  The panel was started in 2010 to support military teens who have a parent currently serving in the National Guard or Reserves.  This is a group of about 14 teens who plan the Teen Summit each year. At our Teen Summit we have utilized 4-H Youth Development Educator, Brian McNeil to teach small group and large group workshops.  We have also partnered with them during Month of the Military Child to award Art Contest participants with prizes and promote Month of the Military Child t-shirts.  The partnerships also included support military children with a parent deployed.  At Yellow Ribbon events, Operation Military Kids provided a Regional Activity Coordinator to implement 6th-12th grade curriculum, provide Hero Packs (for kids with a parent getting ready to deploy) and comfort pillows (with a parent currently deployed) to 3-18 years old.  OMK supported a variety of events for Military Youth including Boots On Camp, SPEAK Out, and Family Camps.Since OMK funding has ended on a national level our partnership with Extension has continued.  We have utilized Extension for our workshops at the Teen Summit.  This year we are utilizing a Health and Nutrition Educator to teach a workshop on Healthy Living.  In the past we have utilized Family Development Educator, Sara Croymans, for a workshop on Finances, Cassandra Silveira for a workshop on Nutrition.   We are continuing to handout Hero Packs and Comfort Pillows at Yellow Ribbon Events.  In addition to the Hero Packs and Comfort Pillows we received a slew of OMK materials that we hand out at our Tween Overnights and Teen Leadership Forum.We haven’t had the chance to connect MN Military with 4-H Youth. However, recently at our Teen Leadership Forum we had 4-H come to implement their Engineering Clinic.  Along with a 4-H County Program Coordinator there was 4 4-H Youth who lead each group of teens throughout the clinic.We have found many benefits to partnering with a great organization, Extension.  There is a vast variety of personnel, and resources to pull from.  The knowledge base of Extension personnel far exceeds what any other organization has to support youth, in general. The opportunities are endless with partnering with an organization consisting of a wide variety of subject matters.  What helps is the fact they are local.  We continue to attend the 4-H Military Partnership Meeting each Spring, where we gather great ideas on how to further develop our partnership with 4-H and extensions as a whole.About us:Laura Groenweg, is the Lead Child and Youth Program Coordinator at Cognitive Professional Service Corporation.  She has been working with State Family Programs for 6 years, and started the Minnesota Military Teen Panel, or MMTP, 5 years ago. In that time she has become a military spouse and has had 2 boys, Levi, 2 ½ years old and Simon, 9 months old.  Recently, she experienced a 6 month separation while her husband was attending Basic Officer Leadership course in Ft. Sill, OK.last_img read more

What I Want to Tell Young People

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now There will be people more talented than you are. There will be many people who are brighter than you are. There will be people who were born with tremendous advantages that you can’t even imagine. But whether any of them can out-hustle you is totally up to you. If you hustle, you will find that almost no one willing to outwork you.Never be afraid to ask for what you want. Especially if you can create value.Do the highest quality work possible. If it takes more time, make the investment. If you need to start over, do so. Your work is a reflection of you as a person, and some part of you that you don’t yet recognize may be your legacy.You will find joy in your work. You may not be able to find joy in a particular job. But your work isn’t the same thing as your job. You need to pursue your work, even if you have to hold down a job while you do so. if that confuses you, just wait. It will be very important to you later.Never, ever, ever stop growing. In a world where so many people believe their are limits or wait for permission, know that there are no boundaries to what you can be, what you can do, what you can have, and what you can contribute. Any limit you perceive is an illness that you need to rid yourself of immediately.Don’t worry about being hurt when it comes to love. You will get hurt. The very act of loving deeply makes you vulnerable, but it’s totally worth it.Money is an amplifier. If you are a horrible person, money will make you more horrible. If you are person who is afraid of losing something, money will make you more afraid. If you are a person who sees money as a vehicle for freedom and security, then money will provide that for you. If you are a person who sees money as way to do good for others in need, it will amplify your ability to do that.The most important things in life are your relationships. But relationships are expensive. They take a major investment of time and energy. But those investments are the most important investments you can make. When you look back from way down the road you have traveled, your relationships are how you are going to measure your life.Practice being compassionate. People walk their own paths, and they are operating from a different set of beliefs and experiences, ones that you don’t know or understand. You don’t know what pain they carry or how they acquired their scars, the visible ones and the ones you cannot see. Compassion is strength.Be creative. Exercise that set of attributes and skills. The world you are entering now is going to need people with the ability to think and be creative more than almost anything else. The only thing that will be needed more will be strong, moral leaders, something that from time to time has been in short supply. This is one of those times.When things seem dark, when it seems like you can’t figure things out, when you feel like everything that can go wrong has gone wrong or is in the process of doing so, wake up really early, go outside and sit facing East. Repeat this as many times as is necessary.last_img read more