Month: June 2021

Edwards comes home to Leeds

first_img“I am also excited to be working with our young players again. Of the current first team squad, half of them came through the Academy during my time there and our job as coaches is to make sure that they maximize their potential this season,” added Edwards.Edwards is an RFU Level 4 coach, was educated at Pocklington School, attained a BSc in Economics and Accountancy at Loughborough University and has spread his playing acumen as a centre around six clubs. He played for Wakefield club from 1992-94 and 2000-02, was also with Leicester Tigers (1994-96), Castleford Tigers RL (1996-97) and Leeds Carnegie (1997-2000) having first played at Selby RFC at the age of six. Edwards, who made 76 appearances for the club in four seasons and was an integral part of the side that climbed up from National Division Three, is equally pleased to be back at Headingley Carnegie. “Firstly, I would like to thank Rob Andrew, Stuart Lancaster, Kevin Bowring and everyone at the RFU for the opportunity to work within a world class organisation for the past year. I feel that I have developed a great deal in the last twelve months and I will always be grateful for the chance to work with the top players and coaches in this country. The achievement of helping the England U20s achieve a Grand Slam this season was a particular highlight for me.“However, the chance to come back to my club and help return us to the top flight was too good to resist and I feel the timing is right for me as a coach. Having been part of the club as a player and coach for nearly 15 years, it has been disappointing to see the side relegated last season. We now have the chance of a fresh start and the opportunity to build a team that the supporters and the Yorkshire public can be proud of. As a club we always build our strengths around our core values and we will be looking to get back to those. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Leeds Carnegie have announced that former player and Academy Manager Diccon Edwards, 38, has agreed to join the club as the Yorkshire side’s new Head Coach on a three year contract.Edwards, who will succeed Neil Back, re-joins the club from the RFU where he held the position of National Academy Coach and England U20 Assistant Coach. He will officially take his new role with Leeds Carnegie on 1st July after the conclusion of his commitments with the RFU which includes the IRB Junior World Championships in Italy, which begins next week.Prior to his appointment at Twickenham a year ago, he had built up a reputation within the game for developing and nurturing some of the country’s best young talent as Academy Manager at Leeds Carnegie. During his time as Academy Manager at Leeds from 2006, when he succeeded Stuart Lancaster in the role, until last year, he produced a dozens of players for the first team squad and led the club’s U19 team to Yorkshire Cup success.Commenting on the appointment, Leeds Rugby Chief Executive Gary Hetherington commented, “We are delighted to announce that Diccon Edwards has agreed to rejoin the club. When Diccon left us to join the RFU last year, we always knew the qualities that he possessed and it is particularly pleasing that we have been able to bring him home to Leeds Carnegie. I would like to thank the RFU for their co-operation as part of this process. Having had a chance to step away from our environment for the past twelve months, Diccon is able to come into the club with a fresh approach but with the added advantage that he knows our operation.“Diccon has a tremendous track record of developing talented players and also knows the National Leagues from his time as Head Coach at Otley. The Board were impressed by his passion for club and his determination to get us back into the Aviva Premiership at the earliest possible opportunity and that is our goal for next season,” added Hetherington.last_img read more

Rugby World tours Clermont Auvergne’s cutting-edge training facility

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS (photo by Amandine Rigaud)It cost up to €6m to build their impressive new facilities – according to one club official, that works out as over €500k a season that could be used to lure “world-class players” to the ambitious club, but a long-term investment that far outweighs the need for a star now. The club worked hard to pull the resources together and over the course of a year the building work was done. In July the ribbon was cut on the centre, which includes a physio room, hot and cold pools, a running track, Olympic lifting platforms and a specially-designed wrestling area. Now, according to some of the players, it’s time the club starting screaming from the rooftops about one of their finest assets.Green with envy: Clermont’s new facility is one to be jealous of (photo by Amandine Rigaud)“Clermont have made some great signings for this season,” full-back Nick Abendanon says. “David Strettle has come in and been awesome and Hosea Gear adds a new attack to our game. But having this facility could give us that extra little bit of edge we need. Last year we were driving 15 minutes to train there (for recovery sessions) or 40 minutes there (for speed drills), and it disrupts everything. This facility doesn’t put pressure on us to say ‘oh, s***, now we’ve got to perform,’ because we do work hard and that’s just part and parcel of playing here. What it does mean is that having it all in one place, with all the amazing technology around, is an awesome thing to have on your doorstep and hopefully it could be the difference.”Nick Abendanon in action (photo by Amandine Rigaud)It’s here that we return to the tour, with the group huddling round a set-piece, as Wales centre Jonathan Davies is set to “pose” doing a bench press. In modern rugby, pulling exercises tend to take precedence over pushing ones, he claims, but then jokes: “When you’re at the disco in Wales, people ask what you’re benching, butt!” Hard yards: Clermont lock Jamie Cudmore on the battle ropes (photo by Amandine Rigaud) After a quick bout of wrestling with team-mate Jamie Cudmore, just before he grabs his gear and heads home, Clermont Auvergne legend Aurelien Rougerie wanders up to Rugby World for a brief chat about his career. Not long into the conversation the huge winger stops halfway through an anecdote about his time in the Top 14 and looks around.“Every year is difficult to make a final and it’s difficult to play every week,” Rougerie says. “You have to work hard and you need a brilliant training centre and a great squad just to make it.”Grappling: Aurelien Rougerie on the wrestling mats (photo by Amandine Rigaud)The club has traditionally had a deep squad, filled with quality locals and Test stars from around the globe, one that has been ravenous for success. But since they have not had a league title since 2010 they have been forced to look for the missing piece. They quickly realised, as players piled into cars to drive away from their match-day home, the Stade Marcel Michelin, that they were doing themselves harm by not training in a multi-purpose, state-of-the-art training centre.So they did something about it.Four years ago Clermont embarked upon a project to build a cutting-edge facility within their own stadium. Officials went on fact-finding missions to training centres that belonged to Manchester United, Lille FC, the Brisbane Broncos in Australian rugby league and even their chief sponsor, Under Armour’s impressive training complex. Cherry-picking the bits of tech that best suited their needs and taking away an idea of their ideal layout, they went to work. Which brings us back to something Rougerie explains. The reason he has lasted so long in the game is because he has enjoyed it. And with clubs like Clermont spending less time now smashing each other out in the rain and mud, honing technique and managing game-specific skills indoors instead, they may as well enjoy what they do.Thanks to Rugby PR, Clermont and Under Armour for the tour of their impressive facility. To read a Pro Insight from the team, telling you how you can train just like Clermont, check out the March issue of Rugby World magazine.last_img read more

Consultants reinstated as full members on ecumenical commission

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (2) Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Consultants reinstated as full members on ecumenical commission TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Stuart Lauters says: Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel March 6, 2012 at 10:30 pm Let’s prefer generosity and understanding over consistency. True, uneven application of standards invites skepticism and worse. Last time I checked, however, we all qualified as human beings — flawed, glorious, hopeless and full of possibility. The destination IS continuing the conversation, not declaring winner and losers. Tags By ENS staffPosted Mar 1, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs M. Andrew Johnston says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ecumenical & Interreligious Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA March 2, 2012 at 1:25 pm The peculiar, precious and provincial ways by which some issues are inconsistantly handled within the Anglican communion continue to bemuse and confuse. From this ECUSA member’s perspective, the message the Archbishop of Canterbury seems to convey is that the Southern Cone’s actions are “bad,” but Uganda’s identical actions are fine. Really? Why are some treated differently? Is this a “hands off Africa” policy? When standards are unevenly applied, it appears as if there are no standards. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Katherine Grieb of the U.S.-based Episcopal Church and Archbishop Tito Zavala of the Anglican Province of the Southern Cone have been reinstated as full members on the Anglican Communion’s chief ecumenical and doctrinal commission.The two members have served for the past two years as consultants to the Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity, Faith and Order (IASCUFO) after their full membership on that body was rescinded at the request of Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams.Williams’ request concerning Grieb came in May 2010 following the consecration of Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Mary Douglas Glasspool, who is openly gay, and his decision about Zavala was made in October 2010 because the Southern Cone had failed to clarify whether it was still involved in cross-border incursions into other provinces.Grieb is an Episcopal priest and professor of New Testament at Virginia Theological Seminary. Zavala was bishop of Chile at the time but has since been elected as archbishop of the Southern Cone province.The request to reinstate the members fully was made by IASCUFO chairman Archbishop Bernard Ntahoturi of the Anglican Church of Burundi.Williams, according to an article from the Anglican Communion News Service, has asked the secretary general of the Anglican Communion to reinstate Grieb and Zavala “acknowledging that members of IASCUFO are present in virtue of skills relevant to the work of the commission and are not present as representatives of their provinces.” Yet when the sanctions were imposed, Williams cited developments and actions taken by the individuals’ provinces.The May 2010 sanctions impacted other Episcopalians serving on ecumenical bodies. Two were asked to leave the Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue and one member each stepped down from the Anglican-Methodist International Commission for Unity in Mission and the Anglican-Lutheran International Commission.One Episcopal Church member serving on the Anglican-Old Catholic International Coordinating Council was initially removed but later reinstated as a consultant after it was agreed that that body is not an ecumenical dialogue but the coordination of work by full communion partners.At the time, no mention was made about ecumenical commission members from other provinces — such as Nigeria, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda – that had been involved in cross-border interventions in the United States. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Anglican Communion, Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Anglicans gather for UN Commission on the Status of Women

first_img Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC UNCSW, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC By ENS staffPosted Mar 12, 2015 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Women’s Ministry Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Participants gather in the United Nations’ General Assembly Hall during the opening of the fifty-ninth session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). Taking place at UN headquarters from March 9-20, the session will review progress made in the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, 20 years after its adoption at the Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995. Photo: United Nations[Episcopal News Service] More than 100 Anglicans are heading to New York for the 59th Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW), meeting March 9-20.During the commission’s annual two-week session, representatives of U.N. Member States, civil society organizations and U.N. entities gather at the U.N. headquarters in New York. They discuss progress and gaps in the implementation of the 1995 Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, the key global policy document on gender equality, and the 23rd special session of the General Assembly held in 2000 (Beijing+5), as well as emerging issues that affect gender equality and the empowerment of women. Member States agree on further actions to accelerate progress and promote women’s enjoyment of their rights in political, economic and social fields. The outcomes and recommendations of each session are forwarded to the U.N.’s Economic and Social Council for follow-up.The commission is due to adopt a political declaration on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing. The draft of that declaration is here. The session is also being asked to adopt a draft plan of the commission’s future organization and methods of work.Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (center right) attends a special event in New York City entitled, “Planet 50-50 by 2030: Step It Up for Gender Equality”. Organized by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), the event marks the twentieth anniversary of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which was adopted by the Fourth World Conference on Women in September 1995. Also pictured: Ban’s wife, Yoo Soon-taek (center) and Republic of Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (center left). Photo: United NationsU.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, in opening remarks on March 9, called 2015 “a vital year for advancing the cause of gender equality.”“Women continue to suffer disproportionately from the economic crisis, from the impacts of climate change, from the displacement caused by conflict, persecution and so much else,” he said. “Extremist groups continue to viciously and systematically attack girls and women. The international community needs to translate its outrage into aid, services, support and justice.”However, Ban said, “women are not just victims; they are agents of progress and change.“Empowered women and girls are the best drivers of growth, the best hope for reconciliation, and the best buffer against radicalization of youth and the repetition of cycles of violence,” he said.The secretary general has submitted a report to the session on the progress since the Beijing meeting.There has traditionally been a strong Anglican and Episcopal presence at past UNCSW annual sessions and more than 100 participants from Anglican provinces around the world are in New York for the 2015 gathering. There are 19 accredited Anglican Communion delegates, each officially representing her province. The Rev. Joan Grimm Fraser of the Diocese of Long Island is the provincial delegate representing The Episcopal Church to the Anglican Communion delegation.The Anglican Communion delegates are from Australia; Hong Kong; Jordan (Jerusalem & the Middle East); Malawi (Central Africa); Myanmar; Papua New Guinea; Aotearoa, New Zealand & Polynesia; Brazil; the Scottish Episcopal Church; Japan; the Church of Ceylon; Swaziland and South Africa; The Episcopal Church; Canada; Ghana (West Africa) and England.Many of the women will visit their permanent country missions at the UN to advocate for the lifting of barriers to women’s active participation in all spheres of public and private life as equal decision-making partners, the core aim of the Beijing Platform for Action.“Anglican women are present in urban and rural communities all over the world”, said Ann Skamp, convener for the International Anglican Women’s Network who is accompanying the delegation. “They know what is happening at grassroots and bring valuable local knowledge and insights to the table. They also bring the values of their faith and bright hope for the future.”Ecumenical Women, of which The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Consultative Council (the Communion’s main policy-making body) are members, has filed an official statement to the session saying that many of the goals of the Beijing Platform for Action remain unfulfilled.“Gender biased institutional structures create inequalities and discrimination, and still exist in public and private sectors, academia, and religious structures,” the statement says, adding that the group is also concerned with “the efforts to roll back gains” made since Beijing.“We affirm that God’s world was meant to be one of abundance for all people, with fundamental rights and dignity for all women and men. For healthy sustainable societies, women must be integral to the decision-making processes in law, policies and development programs.”The Episcopal Church has its first official delegation since being granted special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council last July.A summary of the rest of the Anglican/Episcopal-related UNCSW activities is here.Diocese of Long Island Assistant Bishop Chilton Knudsen preached March 9 at the opening Eucharist for Anglican and Episcopal participants. Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori presided at the Eucharist celebrated in the Chapel of Christ the Lord in the Episcopal Church Center, which is two blocks from the United Nations.The text of Knudsen’s sermon follows.Sermon for the Opening Eucharist UNCSW 2015Episcopal Church Center, New York City, NYText: John 20: 11-18Mary Magdalene came to the tomb where the body of Jesus was placed after his death on the Cross.She came to mourn his absence, to remember. She wanted assurance that she could find hope to live the rest of her life without Jesus. Her precious friend Jesus.Jesus treated her with dignity, healed her, taught her, lifted her up, and shared with her in Table Fellowship. How would she go on without Jesus?Two angels sat in the tomb, one where his feet had been and one where his head had been.“Woman, why are you weeping?” the angels asked.Mary Magdalene was weeping because her heart had broken. She wept because the One whom she loved had been brutally executed. Her tears were a sign that she loved deeply; that she had devoted herself to the mission of compassion and justice and peace which Jesus demonstrated. She wept because human beings do terrible things to each other. Human beings continue to do terrible things to one another, because systems of dominance and power and greed and violence — then and now — crush goodness.Woman, why are you weeping?Just as she answered “They have taken away my Lord…” she turned and saw someone she did not recognize, maybe it was the gardener.This mysterious stranger also asked her the same question: “Woman, why are you weeping?”This is a question to all of humanity, in our time as well as in Jesus’ time.We come here to this meeting of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women because there is much in our world which causes us to weep. We weep because children are sold as slaves. Women and children starve for want of food. Because violence and oppression continue to dominate, so women are deprived of freedom and dignity. We are weeping because women are treated as second-class members of their society.Woman, why are you weeping?Mary Magdalene answers yet again, assuming that someone has taken away Jesus’ body: “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where so I can take his body myself.”At that moment, Jesus calls her by name, “Mary!” She hears that familiar voice speaking her name. At once, she knows it is Jesus, who is now alive in the glorious power of resurrection.Hope is alive! The message of Jesus — about compassion and justice — is victorious over the systems of power and greed and oppression.Jesus then asks two things of her. First, that she not cling to him: not to hold onto the joy of his beating death to live in resurrection glory. Second, Jesus asks that she go and tell others that he is now wonderfully alive, and his mission will continue.Jesus entrusts to Mary Magdalene the proclamation of his rising from death. Jesus lives! His message lives!This story tells us that the holy and mysterious agenda of God is given to all believers. As believers, we are to spread this Good News widely into every part of the world.The Good News of Jesus’ resurrection inspires us to work for justice and peace for all people.And because we are people who weep, we are also people of action.So here we are, praying together for the strength to carry on the mission of Jesus. Our weeping has built in us a fire of determination. God’s power is with us, as we move from weeping to action. By this we join with our sister Mary Magdalene to proclaim that Jesus is risen. And because Jesus is risen, our hope is fulfilled and our resurrection work is blessed with the very power that raised Jesus from death.Let us be about that resurrection work. Beginning now in our worship and our solidarity.— The Anglican Communion News Service contributed to this story. Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglicans gather for UN Commission on the Status of Womenlast_img read more

Resoluciones sobre combustibles fósiles y un comité de asesoría climática…

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA General Convention 2015 Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Resoluciones sobre combustibles fósiles y un comité de asesoría climática pasan a la Cámara de Diputados Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME De la redacción de ENS Posted Jul 1, 2015 Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA General Convention, Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] La Cámara de Obispos aprobó dos resoluciones el 28 y el 29 de junio sobre la inversión ambientalmente responsable y la creación de un comité asesor sobre el cambio climático. Las resoluciones ahora han pasado a la Cámara de Diputados para su aprobación.Los obispos aprobaron la Resolución C045, que pide que el Comité de Inversiones del Consejo Ejecutivo, el Fondo de Dotaciones de la Iglesia y la Fundación de la Iglesia Episcopal “desinviertan de las compañías de combustibles fósiles y reinviertan en energía renovable y limpia de una manera fiscalmente responsable”.La versión enmendada de la C045, una de las cuatro resoluciones que piden desinversión en los combustibles fósiles, fue aprobada en la cámara de viva voz luego de que una enmienda excluyera al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia de la resolución.Gene Robinson, obispo jubilado de Nuevo Hampshire, y síndico saliente del Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia, propuso la enmienda que excluía al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia de la resolución.“La Iglesia y el fondo de pensiones son dos entidades separadas, y tienen diferentes misiones”, dijo él, añadiendo que la misión de la Iglesia es “amar a Dios y hacer bien en el mundo”.La misión del fondo es “proporcionar y garantizar todas las pensiones prometidas a nuestro clero y empleados laicos”, dijo Robinson.El fondo de pensiones es una entidad corporativa regida por la ley del estado de Nueva York, explicó Robinson. “No nos está permitido apartarnos de nuestra responsabilidad fiduciaria. Si la resolución es aprobada tal como está escrita… el fondo de pensiones tendría que decir que no… No es tan simple como puede pude parecer”. “El citó un problema parecido que había experimentado la Iglesia Unida de Cristo.Un gran número de activos en carpetas de valores están combinados, explicó él. “Uno no puede sencillamente extraer uno o dos o cinco de allí. Uno tendría que abandonar ese fondo”. En algunos casos, el Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia se empeñó durante décadas por entrar en esos fondos; una vez que usted se va, no puede volver, dijo él. “Eso resultaría enormemente costoso para nosotros”.Al menos otros cuatro obispos testificaron a favor de la enmienda para sacar al fondo de pensiones de la resolución, todos ellos citando el deber fiduciario.Paul E. Lambert, obispo sufragáneo de Dallas, advirtió de las consecuencias imprevistas de incluir el fondo de pensiones, que podría afectar las pensiones de clérigos más jóvenes y a los que trabajan en congregaciones más pequeñas.Otros, como el obispo Scott Barker, de Nebraska, cuya diócesis presentó una de las cuatro resoluciones de desinversión, se opuso a la enmienda, diciendo: “El dinero es poder”.La Iglesia Episcopal tiene activos financieros que ascienden a miles de millones de dólares; más de $380 millones en fondos fiduciarios; $9.000 millones en fondos de jubilación del clero y otros $4.000 millones entre parroquias y diócesis. “Es de suma importancia que la Iglesia se esfuerce en sentar una pauta con su dinero, al invertir de un modo socialmente responsable”, según un informe sobre inversión corporativa responsable presentado a la Convención General por el Comité de Inversiones del Consejo Ejecutivo.El Grupo de Pensiones de la Iglesia, que incluye el Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia, es una agencia independiente de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS) y sus políticas no están sujetas a las resoluciones de la Convención General. La Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS) es el nombre con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión.Luego de la audiencia del 25 de junio del Comité de Mayordomía Ambiental y Cuidado de la Creación, T. Dennis Sullivan, presidente jubilado del Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia y miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo, dijo que él no creía que hubiera discrepancia entre si existe o no una necesidad de abordar el cambio climático, sino más bien si la desinversión es la estrategia correcta.“Creo, cuando consideramos la desinversión, que es cuestión de juzgar si la desinversión va a promover los objetivos que todos compartimos”, dijo Sullivan a Episcopal News Service. “Y aquí es donde creo que puede tener lugar la discrepancia. Yo argüiría que la desinversión no sólo es probable que resulte ineficaz por una variedad de razones, sino también contraproducente con el objetivo más amplio de mejorar el medio ambiente”.Matt Gobush, visitante de la Diócesis de Dallas y ex presidente del Comité Permanente sobre Paz y Justicia Internacionales, vino a la Convención para testificar sobre ambas resoluciones a favor de crear un comité asesor que pudiera facultar a individuos, congregaciones y diócesis para hacer cambios todos los días a fin de reducir las huellas de carbono.“(La desinversión) resultaría muy costosa para la Iglesia y tendría muy poco impacto”, dijo Gobush, que es asesor principal de promoción integrada y asuntos públicos y gubernamentales en ExxonMobil, durante una entrevista el 28 de junio con ENS. “Hay medios más efectivos de que la Iglesia pueda hacer eso. Ahora bien, yo estoy hablando como episcopal y como individuo sobre lo que puedo hacer personalmente para reducir mi huella de carbón que en definitiva es más efectivo que la desinversión.“Y finalmente la desinversión es divisiva… quiere decir esencialmente que no queremos volver a hablar contigo. Ya no queremos ser accionistas, ya no queremos usar nuestra influencia como Iglesia para dar a conocer nuestros puntos de vista dentro de las salas de juntas corporativas”.La campaña global para desinvertir de [las compañías] de combustibles fósiles ha ganado impulso y ha llegado a ser el tema más discutido acerca de desinversión desde el apartheid de Sudáfrica. Desmond Tutu, arzobispo emérito de Ciudad del Cabo, que luchó contra el apartheid en Sudáfrica, es una de las voces más fuertes en el movimiento a favor de la desinversión de los combustibles fósiles.Un puñado de diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal ha aprobado resoluciones a favor de desinvertir, entre ellas Massachusetts Occidental, Massachusetts y Newark. GreenFaith, una organización ambientalista interreligiosa afincada en la Diócesis de Newark, y otras organizaciones han pedido la desinversión de los combustibles fósiles.“Podrían sorprenderse de ver una resolución de desinversión y de reinversión de Nebraska”, dijo la Rda. Betsy Bennett, diputada de la Diócesis de Nebraska. “Esta primavera y el principio del verano han traído niveles de lluvia en Nebraska que han roto récords y muchas zonas se han inundado al menos una vez este año. La pequeña iglesia parroquial de DeWitt, Nebraska, tenía más de un metro de agua en el sótano en esta primavera y todavía se está secando.“La prosperidad de Nebraska depende de la agricultura. La agricultura depende de la estabilidad del clima. No se sorprendan de nuestra preocupación. Sabemos que algo no anda bien. Sabemos que nuestro modo de vida está amenazado, que nuestras granjas y ranchos y, Dios tenga misericordia de nosotros, las vidas de nuestros hijos y nietos están amenazadas. A la mayoría de nosotros nos gustaría poder usar energía limpia. Ayúdennos a elegir la vida. Desinviertan y reinviertan”.Durante dos años, los episcopales a favor de la desinversión han estado trabajando para facilitar conversaciones que condujeran a la presentación de resoluciones en la Convención General, dijo la Rda. Stephanie Johnson, que es miembro del Comité de Ciencia, Tecnología y Fe del Consejo Ejecutivo.“Nos reunimos con el Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia, nos reunimos con la Fundación de la Iglesia Episcopal, para decirles que queríamos promover la desinversión; quisimos ser francos con ellos, decirles en lo que estábamos trabajando y decirles que estábamos comprometidos con esto” dijo ella en una entrevista con ENS el 29 de junio.“Les oímos muchísimos argumentos, y ellos nos oyeron muchísimos a nosotros, y eso era parte de nuestra estrategia, tener muchísimas conversaciones. Y el Comité 16, este nuevo comité medioambiental, hizo un trabajo extraordinario de tomar cuatro resoluciones y juntarlas en una sola resolución sólida y razonada que le ofrece a la Iglesia una manera de avanzar en este y que le da una voz realmente profética”.Johnson encomió a la Cámara de Obispos por haber aprobado la resolución C045.“Estoy tan energizada por esto, esto es enorme”, dijo Johnson. “Quiero decir que esto es por lo que hemos esperado, y en cuanto a diócesis y congregaciones individuales, la resolución que se elaboró decía que los invitábamos a la conversación y a la reflexión. Esto no es un llamado a que ellos lo hagan, esto es una invitación a ellos, si quisieran participar en la desinversión”.En abril, la Iglesia de Inglaterra, citando “una responsabilidad moral para proteger a los pobres del mundo del impacto del calentamiento global” anunció que desinvertiría del petróleo de arenas bituminosas y del carbón termal, dos de los combustibles fósiles más contaminantes. [La Iglesia] no desinvirtió completamente de todas las compañías de petróleo y gas donde su participación corporativa ha tenido más éxito.La Iglesia Episcopal participa en promoción accionaria a través del Centro Interreligioso sobre Responsabilidad Corporativa.La Cámara de Obispos adoptó la Resolución A030, que en un principio pedía la creación de un equipo de trabajo, pero se modificó para pedir la creación de un comité asesor sobre el cambio climático con un representante de cada una de las nueve provincias de la Iglesia Episcopal. La resolución pide también que cada provincia cree un Grupo Consultivo Regional compuesto “de no menos de cinco expertos en áreas de sostenibilidad ambiental adecuadas a las específicas condiciones demográficas, ecológicas, culturales y geográficas de cada región”.El obispo S. Johnson Howard, de la Diócesis de la Florida, presentó una enmienda, con un agregado textual que estipulaba que los miembros del comité asesor representarían lo que él describió como “la diversidad de la opinión científica sobre el cambio climático y el calentamiento global” a fin de darle credibilidad a la labor del comité en el ámbito mundialDos obispos respondieron que ellos creían, con la comunidad científica decididamente a favor del cambio climático en este punto, poco creíble la diversidad que pudiera añadirse. La enmienda fue rechazada.Nick Knisely, obispo de Rhode Island, el promotor de la resolución, testificó durante una audiencia del Comité sobre Mayordomía Ambiental y Cuidado de la Creación, que la resolución no se proponía iniciar una discusión acerca de la existencia del cambio climático, sino más bien proporcionarle a la Iglesia los recursos para responder pastoralmente a personas que están afectadas por el cambio climático.— Lynette Wilson, redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service, y Tracy J. Sukraw y Sharon Sheridan, corresponsales en la Convención General, colaboraron en este reportaje. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

Summit addresses humanitarian crisis in Central America, US response

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Lynette Wilson Posted Sep 20, 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Summit addresses humanitarian crisis in Central America, US response Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Latin America, Refugees Migration & Resettlement Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Episcopal News Service] Central American migrants arriving at the U.S. border in record numbers no longer makes mainstream news headlines, but that doesn’t mean the crisis in the Northern Triangle has abated.In 2014, 69,000 unaccompanied minors, mothers and children arrived at the U.S. border, bringing attention to the high number of people forcibly displaced by violence in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. By August 2016, that number had reached 160,000, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection.The U.S. response to the crisis has largely been one of increasing security at the border, detention and interdiction by Mexico, of minors and families seeking refuge in the United States. In 2015, Mexico intercepted and returned 200,000 Salvadorans, Guatemalans and Hondurans to the Northern Triangle, a region that suffered 17,500 violent deaths in that same year.These deterrence policies are not working, said Donald M. Kerwin Jr., executive director of the Center for Migration Studies, during a Sept. 20 Shadow Summit to examine the United States’ response to the Central American migrant crisis that has for years been unfolding in its backyard. (Read a report on the Central American Humanitarian Crisis and US Policy Responses here.)The Sept. 20 Shadow Summit came one day after a historic United Nations summit where world leaders adopted the New York Declaration, a document that commits countries around the world to protect the rights of refugees and migrants and to share the responsibility for the record number of people on the move.Noah Bullock, executive director of Cristosal, an El Salvador-based human rights organization with roots in the Episcopal and Anglican churches, participated in one of two panel discussions during the Shadow Summit and talked about the reasons people continue to flee violence in the Northern Triangle.It’s “first a failure of protection,” said Bullock, who was in New York to attend the U.N. summit to advocate for the rights of migrants and refugees. “Guatemala and El Salvador continue to deny that violence is the cause of displacement.”Honduras has recognized it, but continues to struggle with how to address it, he added.Another reason people continue to flee is that governments criminalize the displaced, associating them with the gang members who have committed violence and threatened violence against them, he said.Ultimately, he said, the decision to flee is a “human decision with multiple causes,” influenced by the individual’s and families’ perception of the threat level and the perception of the state’s ability to protect them.On Sunday, Sept. 17, Bullock spoke to the Diocese of Pennsylvania’s Committee for Central American Migrants and Refugees at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Chestnut Hill.“Cristosal’s leadership on the Central American refugee situation is the direct result of its grassroots network of supporters in the Episcopal Church,” said Bullock. “Their commitment to us and our mission allows us to be a nimble and independent human rights organization that initiates responses to immediate problems on the ground, not [only] when grant funds become available.”It is that support that has allowed Cristosal to take the lead in protecting the rights of people forcibly displaced by violence. Cristosal has worked to establish legal precedents for the protection of victims displaced by violence in El Salvador, provides shelter, protection and legal assistance for victims and is working to build regional resettlement capacity.“We were able to implement pilot programs and build a model for working [with displaced people] that now is being identified by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees and by the U.S. Government as good models for expansion. And we have now been awarded grants by both those organizations to do what we are doing in El Salvador, and begin to expand those models into Honduras and Guatemala,” said Bullock in his presentation in Pennsylvania.Cristosal also founded and coordinates the Civil Society Working Group Against Forced Displacement by Violence, the leading national body in El Salvador advocating for the rights of those forcibly displaced by violence. The working group maintains the largest existing database of cases of forced displacement and regularly publishes reports and policy recommendations for both civil society and state entities.The Episcopal and Anglican churches are present in the three Northern Triangle countries: The Diocese of Honduras belongs to Province IX of the Episcopal Church, and the dioceses of Guatemala and El Salvador belong to the Anglican Church of the Central Region of America, known by its Spanish acronym, IARCA.In November 2015, Cristosal brought together Anglican and Episcopal bishops from the region, as well as human rights ombudsmen to discuss a regional approach to forced displacement.The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in October 2015 warned of the “looming refugee crisis” emanating from Central America.Also on Sept. 20, President Barack Obama co-hosted a Leaders’ Summit on Refugees, alongside Canada, Ethiopia, Germany, Jordan, Mexico and Sweden. The leaders’ summit appealed to governments to pledge increased commitments to resettle refugees. Obama’s remarks are here.Worldwide, war and persecution have forced a total of 65.3 million people, 21.3 million of them refugees, from their homes, four times more than a decade ago and the largest number of people displaced since World War II.“It’s easy for us to look across the ocean and say the problem is over there, but the truth is that we have a refugee crisis right here in our hemisphere,” said Olympia Bishop Greg Rickel, who serves on Cristosal’s board, in a recent video that addresses the Central American crisis.The Northern Triangle is one of the most violent places in the world, said Rickel. “Last year, 700,000 people were displaced from their homes by violence and 17,500 people were killed.”Of the 85,000 refugees projected for resettlement in the United States in 2016, 3,000 were expected to come from Latin America and the Caribbean.— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Full coverage of 50th anniversary celebrations in Rome

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rome50th Rector Martinsville, VA Posted Oct 7, 2016 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ecumenical & Interreligious, Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Full coverage of 50th anniversary celebrations in Rome TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

Canadian partnership strengthens lay training in Cyprus and the Gulf

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Anglican Communion, Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service]  The Anglican Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf has partnered with a Canadian theological college to accredit its lay training course. The Exploring Faith course is part of the diocese’s commitment to lifelong learning and can lead to qualifications at diploma or degree level. The diocese has been using the course for the past five years. Currently, some 15 students are enrolled on the course and a further nine are expected to sign up from January.Read the entire article. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Sep 18, 2017 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canadian partnership strengthens lay training in Cyprus and the Gulf Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Middle East Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

Welby’s Lambeth invite apology smooths way for Anglican Consultative Council…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny, center, is embraced May 4 by Burundian Bishop Eraste Bigirimana, right, and Diocese of Nairobi Bishop Joel Waweru, both of whom opposed a resolution he proposed. Both participated in crafting a compromise that the Anglican Consultative Council unanimously passed. Photo: Paul Feheley/Anglican Communion News Service[Episcopal News Service — Hong Kong] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, working with others, preserved the unity of the 17th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council on May 4 by apologizing for his 2020 Lambeth Conference decision about bishops in same-sex relationships and agreeing to renew the communion’s 21-year-old promise to listen to the experiences of LGBTQ people.“I ask your forgiveness where I made mistakes,” Welby said.The April 28-May 5 meeting came close to breaking down during the afternoon of its last business day, not over the Lambeth Conference, but over the larger issue of how much the council ought to say about the full inclusion of LGBTQ people in the life of the church.The conflict arose via Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny’s resolution calling on the communion’s Standing Committee to gather information about the provinces’ efforts to listen to people “who have been marginalized due to their human sexuality within the church, society and their respective cultures.”Full ENS coverage of the 17th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council is available here.The members did not object to that work. However, a number of them refused to accept the resolution’s preamble, which would have reaffirmed “the respect and dignity of persons as Children of God who have been marginalized due to their human sexuality” and state that “they should be fully included in the life of the Anglican Communion.”The frank but polite debate over the resolution, the intense negotiations that took place during breaks in that debate, and the ensuing completely rewritten resolution proved that “in the end, the love of Christ showed through,” Konieczny told Episcopal News Service after the meeting. “We showed that we’re able to have conversation and we’re able to understand one another and that we’re able to compromise.”“Maybe what little bit of what we did here can be an example for the larger communion and, for those who chose to stay away, that maybe in some way this will help them at least think about coming back.”Nigeria, Rwanda and Uganda did not send members to the ACC-17 meeting. Some bishops have said they will not attend the Lambeth Conference because they object to the theological stances of other bishops and provinces.The Rev. Michael Barlowe, The Episcopal Church’s clergy member on ACC, called Konieczny’s weeklong effort “courageous.” The Episcopal Church, he said after the meeting, was served well by Konieczny “graciously trying to engage a very controversial subject.”The entire ACC was gracious during the nearly three hours of debate and negotiation, said Rosalie Ballentine of the Diocese of the Virgin Islands, The Episcopal Church’s lay member.“It does show that we can disagree in a loving way,” she said. “Some of us in The Episcopal Church sometimes need to learn to step back and realize that it’s really supposed to be about Jesus, about God, about how we walk in faith, as opposed to getting our way. A lot of that was demonstrated today.”Debating ‘included’ versus ‘welcomed’The language in the resolution’s preamble touched all the rifts in the communion over sexuality and went too far for some. It got no better when an amendment proposed changing the last clause, “they should be fully included in the life of the Anglican Communion,” to “they are fully welcomed in the life of the Anglican Communion.”The members debated the nuances of being “included” or “welcomed,” and whether the understanding of either word changed when translated into other languages.Konieczny accepted the amendment to move the resolution forward and it passed 38-20, with 17 abstentions.During the ensuing debate on the resolution, Sudanese Archbishop Ezekiel Kondo said that in his majority-Muslim country “tomorrow the church will be closed” if the ACC agreed to the resolution. “If we pass this resolution, we are sending a very wrong signal” to the church and the world, he said.Bishop Eraste Bigirimana, from the Burundian Diocese of Bujumbura, said the communion has been divided since Anglicans formally began talking about sexuality at the 1998 Lambeth Conference. The division, he said, comes because not all believe that “the Bible is very clear: fornication is a sin, adultery is a sin, homosexuality is a sin for the Christian.” Bigirimana said, “The Bible has to be our reference.”Diocese of Nairobi Bishop Joel Waweru opposed the resolution because it “sets doctrine,” something the ACC does not do. He said ACC members “have not had any time to discuss issues of human sexuality” but were now being asked to vote on a resolution about it. And, Waweru argued, the resolution ought to be expanded to include people who have suffered discrimination for any reason.“As one coming from the global south,” the bishop said he agreed with others who worried that passing the resolution would give fodder to conservative Anglicans, prompting even more of them to boycott the 2020 Lambeth Conference.Canadian Diocese of Edmonton Bishop Jane Alexander told her colleagues that the ACC resolution simply reminded the church about the yet-unfulfilled commitment the 1998 Lambeth Conference made via Resolution 1.10 to listen to LGBTQ people.If the ACC cannot reaffirm the respect and dignity of those who have been marginalized due to their human sexuality, she said, “then my heart is broken and we’ve broken our Baptismal Covenant,” and “we didn’t mean a word” of the Code of Conduct, which members passed at the start of the meeting that contains a similar statement.Near the end of nearly 45-minute debate, Konieczny said he would not support a proposal that was made to delete the entire preamble. He said he worked on the resolution all week and accepted “multiple revisions” because he was conscious of the differences that ACC members represent.“I’m distressed. My heart is broken. My faith is challenged that” the council cannot affirm the statement made in the week-old Code of Conduct and “that we want to send a message to the world that we will respect you at a distance, but you’re not welcome. This is not the body of Christ in which I belong,” Konieczny said.For the ACC to debate whether anyone was a child of God and welcome in the church “is beyond my understanding,” he said, adding that 50% of the geographical areas of the member churches “disenfranchise, incarcerate and execute people who differ in their human sexuality, yet we say nothing.”“Instead, we’re worried about the politics instead of the people.”After the members paused to pray, ACC Vice Chair Margaret Swinson ruled that the proposal to delete the preamble “destroys the spirit in which this motion was offered too much” for her to exercise her discretion to allow it to come to a vote.During the afternoon tea break, an increasingly large group of ACC members gathered around the Archbishop of Canterbury and Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny as they stood below the dais in the council’s meeting room, searching for compromise. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceWelby suggested that the council pause for table group discussion. That pause led into what became a nearly 50-minute “tea break,” during which various combinations of members and staff huddled, sometimes joined by Konieczny, trying to craft a compromise. Welby was often at the center. Waweru and Konieczny worked together at one point, Waweru with his hand on Konieczny’s back as he sat and read the final proposal.With that draft in hand, Swinson asked the members to listen to Welby and decide if they could accept it as a compromise. He reminded the members that the Anglican Communion has fiercely disagreed in the past about contraception, divorce and women’s ordination. “So, we must not panic” about the current chapter in the communion’s nearly 30-year-old debate about sexual identity, Welby said.The archbishop of Canterbury is known as the “focus of unity” for the ACC, Lambeth Conference and the Primates Meeting. In that spirit, Welby said it is his “fault and my responsibility” that certain people are upset because some people were invited to the 2020 Lambeth Conference and others were not.“It may be that at the end of time, I will understand that I got that wrong, and I will answer for it in one respect or another on the day of judgment,” he said. “Where I handled it badly, which I am sure I did, for one group or another, I want to apologize to you because I have not helped the communion, either for those who are concerned by who was invited or those who are concerned by who was not invited.“I ask your forgiveness where I made mistakes.”Diocese of Nairobi Bishop Joel Waweru, standing at left, keeps his hand on Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny’s shoulder as the latter reads the language of a possible compromise to a resolution that threatened to derail the last business session of ACC-17. Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby stands reading at Konieczny’s left, Bishop of Lambeth Tim Thornton is at his right, and next to Thornton is Lambeth Palace Assistant Chief of Staff Stephen Knott. ACC Vice Chair Margaret Swinson, at right, talks with ACC legal adviser Darren Oliver, while Bishop Anthony Poggo leans over the table. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe compromise wording, which came to the council as an amendment by Waweru and eliminated the original preamble, notes “with concern the pattern of invitations to the Lambeth Conference 2020” and asks Welby to put in place a listening process “with supportive and independent facilitation in order to hear the concerns and voices of people especially those who have felt themselves marginalized with regard to their sexuality.”Welby must also organize the collection of the work already done in the communion since Lambeth 1998 Resolution 1.10 called for such a process. He is to report to the Standing Committee and ACC-18 in 2022. Lastly, the resolution asks him to report to both groups about “all issues of discrimination” across the communion.After his apology and explanation of Waweru’s amendment, Welby apologized in French and translated the amendment into French. He asked Diocese of Northern Argentina Nick Drayson to translate both into Spanish and Diocese of Central Tanganyika Bishop Dickson Chilongani to do the same in Swahili. Members for whom English is not their first language have struggled throughout the meeting from the lack of any formal interpretation or translation services.“Out of respect and love and affection for our archbishop and out of love and affection for our member churches, and especially for my brothers in the global south, and for the unity of the church,” Konieczny said that he was “willing to accept this amendment from my brother, Joel.”Struggling to speak, Konieczny said he wanted his “brother bishops in the south” to know that “we are willing to talk and walk in unity and love together, and encourage them to come and meet with us.”Waweru’s amendment passed 83-0 with three abstentions in a straw poll meant to test its strength. Waweru, Chilongani and Bigirimana came to Konieczny to hug him. The Kenyan bishop kissed Konieczny’s episcopal ring, and he responded in kind as the members began to sing “Bless the Lord, my soul.”The council formally convened and passed the amended resolution “by general consent.”The resolution, titled ‘The dignity of human beings,’ says“The Anglican Consultative Councilnotes with concern the pattern of invitations to the Lambeth Conference 2020 and requests that the Archbishop of Canterbury as a focus of unity ensures that a listening process is put in place with supportive and independent facilitation in order to hear the concerns and voices of people especially those who have felt themselves marginalized with regard to sexuality. The Archbishop of Canterbury will also be responsible for compiling all the work done in this area across the Anglican Communion since Lambeth 1998 and reporting to the Standing Committee [of the ACC] and ACC18.requests the Archbishop of Canterbury to look at all issues of discrimination across the Anglican Communion and make recommendations to the Standing Committee and to report back to ACC18.”The council later rejected a previously filed resolution that would have asked Welby to consider establishing a theological task group to clarify the core identity and boundaries of the Anglican Communion in the 21st century. Konieczny said he feared the resolution’s actual intent was to create a body with the power to declare “who’s in and who’s out in the Anglican Communion.” The vote, 43-35 with eight abstentions, came after Swinson ruled that it had passed after her request for “general consent,” and Konieczny, along with a third of his colleagues, requested a show of hands. It was the first time in recent memory that the ACC refused to accept a measure favored by the archbishop of Canterbury.“Praise God that you voted against what I wanted,” Welby later told the members. “That’s Anglicanism.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Archbishop of Canterbury Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 4, 2019 Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Consultative Council, Rector Collierville, TN Welby’s Lambeth invite apology smooths way for Anglican Consultative Council to walk together Weeklong effort by Oklahoma bishop to have ACC speak on LGBTQ people ends in negotiated measure Rector Bath, NC ACC17, Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

A summary of Executive Council resolutions

first_img Rector Belleville, IL [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] During its June 10-13 meeting here The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council adopted multiple resolutions that are summarized below.Committee on Finance* Establish Trust Fund 1197, Protestant Episcopal Bishop of San Joaquin for the benefit of Saint Paul’s, Bakersfield, for the Diocese of San Joaquin, California (FIN030).* Establish Trust Fund 1198, Hunt Bequest-Kitchen STPAAS for St. Peter & All Saints Episcopal Church in Kansas City, Missouri (FIN031).* Establish Trust Fund 1199, Hunt Bequest-Canterbury STPAAS for St. Peter & All Saints Episcopal Church in Kansas City, Missouri (FIN032).* Establish Trust Fund 1200, Hunt Bequest-Food STPAAS for St. Peter & All Saints Episcopal Church in Kansas City, Missouri (FIN033).* Establish Trust Fund 1201, St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, for St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Albuquerque, New Mexico (FIN034).* Establish Trust Fund 1202, St. Paul’s KCMO Parish Endowment, for St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Kansas City, Missouri (FIN035).* Use income and appreciation of trust funds 179.01, 240.00, 341.03 and 773.01 to benefit Voorhees College; and, if this is not possible, use income and appreciation of those trust funds to benefit other Episcopal historically black colleges; and, if this is not possible, use income and appreciation of those trust funds to support any African American Episcopalian student attending a college or university affiliated with The Episcopal Church, as the Executive Council sees fit (FIN036).* Use a portion of accumulated appreciation not to exceed $55,000 of Trust Fund 188, Gift of John H. Hewson (1908), to fund management training for staff (FIN037).* Authorize raising the employer base contribution from 5 percent to 8 percent of base salary, effective July 1 to make contributions to lay and clergy pension savings plans more equivalent for all lay employees of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, or DFMS (the church’s legal and corporate entity); and authorize DFMS to pay for the Medicare supplement premium for spouses of retired lay employees who have served at least 10 years; costs be funded, as needed, from council’s “reserve for lay employee benefit-related expenses” during the 2019-2021 triennium and costs be included within the budgets adopted by General Convention in subsequent triennia (FIN038).* Designate a portion of the total compensation paid to two DFMS missionaries for calendar year 2019 as housing allowances pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 107 and Internal Revenue Service Regulations S1.107 (FIN041).* Approve the marketing and sale of two buildings and five lots in Guam, proceeds to be used for general purposes of the Episcopal Church in Micronesia (FIN042).Committee on Governance and Operations* Establishes a nine-member Foresight Committee to bring forward to council issues key to the effective future ministry and mission of The Episcopal Church for discussion, consultation and potential action (G008).* Acknowledge receipt of the report of the Church Pension Fund (CPF), in its capacity as the Recorder of Ordinations, in response to Resolutions 2018-C029 (Clergy Compensation by Race) and D037 (Expand Clergy Compensation Report); ask that CPF engage in further review and modification of the proposed implementation plans, particularly addressing the issues of education, self-reporting, privacy and data protection; CPF to submit a revised proposal for implementation of the resolutions to the secretary of General Convention not less than 30 days prior to the October 2019 meeting of council (GO009).* Direct that before council accepts any nomination to fill an unexpired term for a vacant council seat, nominees undergo the background checks and reviews described in Joint Rules of Order of the House of Bishops and House of Deputies, Section VII.21, to determine whether anything in that background check precludes the proposed nomination; before nominations are made at provincial synods for the election of lay and clergy representatives to council for 2021, each nominee’s name be submitted to the office of General Convention for the same background check and review; if it is determined by office of secretary of General Convention, in consultation with the chief legal officer, that the results should preclude a person from holding the office sought, the General Convention office shall share the determination with the proposed nominee and remit that determination, but not the background check results, to the nominator (background check information shall not be shared beyond those entities); costs of such background checks shall be covered by the General Convention budget (GO010).Committee on Mission Beyond The Episcopal Church* Elect the Rev. George Sherrill Jr. of the Diocese of Southern Ohio as a member of the Presbyterian Episcopal Dialogue Committee for a term ending December 31, 2021 (MB007).* Express concern about the ongoing political and humanitarian situation in Burundi, dating from April 2015, when plans were announced to hold a referendum to revise the nation’s constitution; note with grave concern United Nations Commission of Inquiry’s finding that “reasonable grounds to believe that crimes against humanity have been committed in Burundi since April 2015” and confirming “the persistence of extrajudicial executions, arbitrary arrests and detentions, enforced disappearances, torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment and sexual violence in Burundi since April 2015”; commend the work of the Anglican Province of Burundi and Archbishop Martin Blaise Nyaboho, who seek to transform, empower, and promote justice in the community; call upon all parties to the conflict, and their international partners, to work towards a peaceful resolution to the ongoing crisis; encourage the Office of Government Relations to partner with Anglicans and ecumenical partners to advocate for peace, human rights and good governance in Burundi (MB008).* Express The Episcopal Church’s continued support for the principles of multilateralism that underpin global dialogue and concerted action in the world; encourage all member states of the United Nations to continue to support and engage in its work and functioning, including through timely payment of their dues (MB009).* Express thanks and appreciation to Ursuline Bankhead for her presentation on implicit bias, leading the council into a deeper appreciation of this aspect of our common life as the Beloved Community; state that the Executive Council desires to continue this important work with her, with sufficient time devoted for meaningful conversations between members of that might result in transformations in the shared life of the council; Bankhead, or another facilitator with equal training, passion and insight, be requested to offer a presentation at the October 2019 council meeting that would prepare hearts and minds more fully to appreciate the experience and context of the meeting in Montgomery, Alabama; call for implicit bias training and presentations be a part of the work of the next triennium, beginning with the October 2021 council meeting, so that the new class of members will be enabled to share the fruits of this important work (MB010).* Express grave concern and sorrow for the recent rise in easily preventable diseases due to anti-vaccination movements which have harmed thousands of children and adults; condemn the continued and intentional spreading of fraudulent research that suggested vaccines might cause harm; recognize no claim of theological or religious exemption from vaccination for our members and reiterates the spirit of General Convention policies that Episcopalians should seek the counsel of experienced medical professionals, scientific research and epidemiological evidence; call on the Office of Government Relations to advocate to the United States government for stronger vaccination mandates informed by epidemiological evidence and scientific research; urge all religious leaders to support evidence-based measures that ensure the strongest protections for our communities; ask congregations and dioceses to partner with medical professionals to counter false information, and to become educated about programs in their communities that can provide vaccinations and immunizations at reduced or no cost to those in need (MB011).Committee on Mission Within The Episcopal Church* Approve Roanridge Trust grants (MW002).* Approve United Thank Offering grants (MW003).* Request General Convention Office have staff or an appropriate contractor analyze information from the 2018 Parochial Reports to report to council and the wider church about the number of congregations who host or conduct worship in a language other than English (including sign language for hearing impaired congregations), the languages used and, to the extent the data can be readily gathered, information on whether these congregations have prayer books authorized by The Episcopal Church or another province of the Anglican Communion in their language, and whether these congregations have the full Scriptures in their native language; request that the report include the number of congregations lacking either or both (a) Scriptures in their native language and (b) an authorized version of the BCP in their native language, together with estimates of the cost and effort needed to assure that these resources are made available to such congregations and to those intending to begin mission work in these linguistic communities; if a full report is not available, request an interim report two weeks in advance of the October council meeting (MW004).* Adopt policies for vaccination standards within Episcopal institutions and programs requiring them to ensure the safety of participants, including that all participants and staff participating are vaccinated in accordance with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Immunization Schedule and/or applicable state law; outside of the United States, local health agencies, ordinances and protocols should be followed in place of the CDC Immunization Schedule; a participant may be exempted from this vaccination requirement only by presenting a certificate from a licensed physician to the staff stating that due to the physical condition of the participant one or more specified immunizations would endanger the participant’s life or health; coordinator of applicable programs and facilities should review for completeness the immunization records of all participants, staff and volunteers for the safety of all involved in the program; dioceses, parishes, schools, camps, daycare and childcare programs, and other programs at Episcopal facilities or sponsored by Episcopal institutions should strive to ensure funding is available or partner with charities to ensure that vaccinations can be made available so that no child is prohibited from participation due to financial burden of vaccination; request the chief legal officer to create a model policy for the church based on this resolution (MW005).* Express deep concern that additional restrictions on remittances and travel, and recent efforts to marginalize Cuba will cause U.S.-Cuba relations to deteriorate further; express concern that any additional travel and financial restrictions will have a negative and harmful impact on the church’s religious activities; and that it will be increasingly difficult for our clergy to obtain visas to come to the United States from Cuba and to go to Cuba from the United States; religious exchanges, travel and engagement, particularly when there is a shared faith tradition, help sustain faith communities and contribute to religious expression and religious liberty, and bridge building, fellowship and continuing to be in relationship will allow the transformation of the political dynamics between the U.S. and Cuba; assert that the policy changes are also likely to negatively impact U.S. relations with Canada, the European Union, Latin American and Caribbean nations, and limiting the frequency and amounts of remittances will increase economic hardship for many Cuban families and will further isolate the Cuban people; reiterate The Episcopal Church’s call for an end to the embargo; and reassert a commitment to strengthening relations between the Cuban and American peoples (MW006).Complete ENS coverage of the meeting is here. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Executive Council June 2019 Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Executive Council, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tagscenter_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest A summary of Executive Council resolutions AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 13, 2019 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more