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Jeremy Schon & Greg Ormont Talk Domefest History, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong’s One-Song Set

first_imgFew bands in recent years have experienced growth as steady and sustained as Pigeons Playing Ping Pong. The jam-funk quartet first came together in the dorm rooms of their alma mater, the University of Maryland, and has gradually sprouted into one of the jam scene’s biggest touring attractions, selling out revered clubs and theaters nationwide and earning slots at countless major festivals.At the same time, they’ve also grown their own festival, Domefest. Started by lead guitarist Jeremy Schon as a one-day event during their senior year of college, Domefest has blossomed into a three-day camping event, with its 9th-annual iteration scheduled for May 17th through 19th.“The band started for fun, and it continues for fun,” explains vocalist/rhythm guitarist Greg Ormont. “We started in the dorm room just to become friends and goof off after going out and stuff. And I think we’ve always kept that honest, genuine appreciation for playing music with each other on the larger stages that we’re playing now.”Just like the band, Domefest—named after the domed roofs on the original event grounds—began with an organic combination of fortunate circumstances nine years ago and has evolved gradually into a beloved tradition in itself, despite the various potential trappings of sustaining a small-scale festival over the course of many years. All the while, Pigeons has amassed a passionate following—affectionately known as “The Flock”—which continues to grow larger and more fervent with each show.In many ways, that steady, sustained growth can be traced to the prevailing attitude of the band. Explains Ormont:As long as every show is better than the last, we’re moving in the right direction. … It’s just really been all about the fun, and pushing yourself to be your best self. That’s something I think you would do no matter what job you have, or what life you’re leading. I think that’s just a good way to approach your passions. You almost can’t lose if you’re giving it your all and you’re having fun doing it.Ahead of the 9th-annual Domefest this month, Live For Live Music’s Andrew O’Brien caught up with Greg Ormont and Jeremy Schon of Pigeons Playing Ping Pong to talk about the story behind the festival, what it’s like to pull double-duty as both performers and organizers, and how exciting musical moments like their recent one-song set came together.Andrew O’Brien: Now that your spring dates are winding down, next up on the docket is your own festival, Domefest. This will be your 9th Domefest, which might surprise some people since that surely pre-dates Pigeons Playing Ping Pong’s more widespread fame in this scene. How did Domefest get started?Jeremy Schon: When we were at the University of Maryland, I was involved in the Maryland Music Business Society, a student organization which was started by me and Greg’s roommate, who we lived with for many years. I was our concert director, and a big thing I wanted to do with that club was to throw a day festival. It was very challenging to pull it off on campus. We didn’t have any funding, but we found this cool property that was 15 minutes away from our college campus, and the owner was super into us doing something there, so we decided we’d do something small.Then, at the last minute, we managed to get some funding from the school as one of their student groups. It was not a big sponsorship, but it was something. That made me think, “Okay, I can actually do things a little bit better.” I really owe it to them—it helped kinda start the whole thing. Because I didn’t have, like, a dollar. [laughs]Greg Ormont: And obviously, he had been to a few festivals, and had a good time there and wanted to replicate it.Jeremy: A big inspiration was definitely going to music festivals myself, starting with Bonnaroo, and then All Good. Then, I finally went to Camp Barefoot in 2009, which was the first small festival I went to. I was blown away by the intimacy, by the vibe. When the opportunity came to do Domefest, I wanted to capture that feeling as much as possible and introduce people to new music that they might not have known before, as I was introduced to tons of new bands at Camp Barefoot.Greg: Fortunately, Jeremy has really great taste in music and is able to pick these up-and-coming bands, some of which you might not have heard of, but our fans all love listening to them at Domefest. So I think we’ve gained that trust from the fanbase where they look at the lineup, maybe they know a few bands, maybe they don’t know all of them, but they trust that at Domefest, they’re all gonna be great bands, good people, and it’ll be a great time. Which is really exciting, because that gives Jeremy a little more leeway on picking certain bands that might not have a great following yet in our area, but he believes in them and he wants to show our friends.Andrew: Pigeons Playing Ping Pong was already up and moving at that point, but did you necessarily start it as a “Pigeons Festival,” as a “vehicle for my band?” Or was it something separate?Jeremy: It honestly evolved into that. It was May 1st, 2010, when we had the first Domefest. [Pigeons] were just really getting started. We had been a band for maybe just about three years at that point. You know, we were obviously a core band [on the lineup] from the start, but I didn’t really think of us as a headliner. We just weren’t a headliner nearly at that point in [the band’s] life.But we eventually realized after about three years that no matter who the headliner we were bringing in was, we were still one of the main draws of the festival. It sort of just made sense to make it a little more Pigeons-centric and help the two grow alongside each other, because, obviously, Pigeons started developing momentum as Domefest developed momentum. I brought in Greg to help produce the event with me after the third or fourth year—I can’t keep track—because I needed someone who shared in the artistic vision and detail-oriented nature of all the aspects of throwing a festival.Brady Cooling | Domefest 2017Greg: The first Domefest was the first music festival that I ever attended, which is kind of crazy when you think about it. I didn’t do anything to organize the festival for the first few years. I would see that Jeremy was always working and sending emails and stressing over details and be like, “Man, this is like a lot of effort. I’m curious as to what the payoff is.” And then I experienced it first-hand, and it was a life-changing experience.I think that’s another reason why I was so on-board and behind this message once I joined the Domefest team. It just had such a profound impact on my life that I wanted to have that happen to my friends and even people I don’t know, to just have them experience that. It’s amazing to have that eye-opening experience and then be able to keep the tradition going. It kind of has always been just from Jeremy taking the lead, putting things on the way we like it. And it hasn’t failed us yet.It’s an incredible thing to be able to do. We don’t take it lightly… and at the same time, we take it really lightly. [laughs] You work hard behind the scenes and then you get to enjoy the show, but once you’re playing music and you’re onstage, that’s the fun.Andrew: It is definitely impressive that it’s you two handling the nuts and bolts of putting on the festival. That’s not always the case when bands “host” a festival.Greg: Like Jeremy said, it’s a ton of work. It is wonderful to see when everyone’s there, but I mean, Jeremy and I are working on Domefest about nine months out of the year, every single day. We are masters of Google Drive, spreadsheets, emails. We live our lives online when we’re on tour as Domefest approaches. Sometimes our fans have been like, “I heard at Domefest, you’re actually working. You’re not being prima donnas, not doing anything.” And I’m thinking to myself, “I mean, someone has to throw the festival.” You know what I mean?We literally organize everything. We’re the ones emailing and speaking to everyone who’s coming, and we see it through. As we get closer and closer, it becomes pretty intense juggling touring with Pigeons and, you know, lining up our staff and volunteers and vendors and making sure everything’s ready for the festival. And, at the end of the festival, if our cleaning crew has left and we see cigarette butts on the floor, we pick them up. Every year, we’re able to do a little bit less of the nitty-gritty stuff like picking up cigarette butts. [laughs] It takes a bit of sacrifice, but there’s nothing sweeter than seeing all your friends with that smile on their face at the festival.Brady Cooling | Domefest 2017Andrew: That personal touch you put into Domefest surely comes across to the fans, and probably has a lot to do with the event’s long-term success. You have to make it a tradition, make it something people look forward to in and of itself, not just for a specific band or set. That may be the biggest key to surviving as a festival, particularly a small festival.Greg: I definitely agree. Domefest has really blossomed into something special with that in mind. People go every year—it’s like their kind of spring kick-off to the festival season. Last year, we had our first wedding on the festival property, which was beautiful! All of their vows were, like, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong lyrics, saying, like, “Ever since I saw you, I knew you’d be my ‘Julia’,” and it was really sweet. The year before that, some of our friends got engaged at Domefest. People are doing bachelor parties this year. … It’s definitely an honor to have those things happen at our festival, and I would be surprised if Jeremy expected that nine years ago when he started this thing—that people would be getting married at Domefest. That’s really special.Jeremy: It definitely blows my mind. I never expected to be doing a ninth edition of the festival, that wasn’t even a thought in 2010. It never really dawned on me that this would become a thing.Brady Cooling | Domefest 2017Andrew: Another way you showcase your attention to detail with Domefest is with the inclusion of “Undercover” Pigeons Playing Ping Pong sets. At last year’s Domefest, you did a “Dead Phish” set, and mixed Grateful Dead and Phish songs with your own. Any hints on what’s in store for Domefest “Undercover” set?Greg: We love doing themed shows, especially around Halloween and New Year’s Eve. This last New Year, we did a Disney theme, “DisNYE”. It was so much fun. We actually had that idea brewing for like three years. Just the “DisNYE” made sense and, obviously, their music is incredible.A lot of the time, we try to pick a theme that will help us grow as musicians. One of our earliest themes was a Motown theme in Baltimore that really was like a crash course in songwriting, especially in the funk category. And we learned a lot doing the Disney thing. We have a lot of really good ideas that are in our back pockets that we’ll be un-rolling over the next few years. … We’re never trying to just sit on anything—”Okay, we just did the Disney set? What’s next? We just finished this year’s Domefest? What’s next?”—and I think that drive really keeps it interesting for us, and it keeps it interesting for our fans.Phierce Photo | Keith Griner | 12/31/17Andrew: A lot of times, small festivals have trouble sustaining over long periods for a variety of reasons, but you guys have managed to not just survive, but thrive and grow. The same could be said about Pigeons Playing Ping Pong. In just the last few years, you’ve gone from playing small rooms in minor markets to selling out multi-night runs in revered theaters around the country. Do you have any thoughts on that sustainable but rapid growth and the reasons behind it?Jeremy: I think a big thing for us was that we always had this drive to push forward musically and professionally—to make our show better. Every time people see us, we want to have tightened-up songs. We want to have tightened-up jams, or make jams looser, in some ways. We’re never complacent on the product, so to speak. We always want to be better. We want to constantly improve, in big ways and in little ways. Since day one, that’s been our attitude. … I mean, we work hard. We put a lot into it. A lot more than meets the eye, I’d like to think.Greg: Similarly, with Domefest, we’ve tried to be very patient and realistic as we grow and gain more attendees and fans and stuff. Sometimes, the smaller festivals, they’ll have a few successful years and then they’ll get a little too big for their britches, try to bring on some huge headliner, and try to jump from “small festival” to, like, “humongous festival.” And we’ve seen a lot of festivals kind of crash and burn with that approach.Fortunately, Jeremy has had the foresight to sort of slowly build the lineups and trust in the process that people are there to see great music, not necessarily an enormous nationally or internationally-touring band. They just want an escape in the woods, to see some of their favorite bands, and, hopefully, catch some new ones. And as a result, Domefest is looking like it will sell out this year for the first time at this location. But it’s not our first time selling out Domefest. We’ve just had smaller locations in the past, and we like to slowly make it to that point and grow at a normal, natural, patient pace.Andrew: What about your approach to planning Domefest is different now than it was nine years ago?Greg: Over the years, Pigeons has played hundreds of festivals, small and big. So at this point, we’re really just kind of putting on the festival that we would want to go to, both as an attendee and as a band. So the bands make new fans, and attendees make new friends, and the camping is comfortable, and the staff works hard to make sure everyone’s happy and has everything they need. That whole mindset of “what would we want to experience at the festival” or “what would we want to experience at a show” is what we pour into Domefest and all of our Pigeons Playing Ping Pong concerts. I think that’s one reason fans are so strongly into it and getting [Pigeons] tattoos and stuff. We’ve always tried to reflect our fans and what they would want and, in that, what we would want.Also, from the Pigeons side of things, after the show, we still love to talk to the fans and go out and sign stuff if they want us to, or just have a drink with them and get to know them better. And I think our fans appreciate that. Rob Chafin from The Werks told me a long time ago to “stay, homie,” and that was the best advice I’ve ever gotten. [laughs] You know? No matter what’s going on, just stay homie, be yourself, relate to the people around you, and appreciate what you have. So we definitely appreciate where we’re at, and we’re definitely pushing ourselves to be at our best at all times, whether it’s writing new songs, whether it’s working on jams, or even just on spreadsheets, phone calls, and emails.Andrew: Speaking of working on jams, you guys did a bit of particularly notable jamming recently at Port City Music Hall, when you stretched out “Funk E. Zekiel” for an entire, hour-plus, single-song set of improvisation. Was that something you really planned to do ahead of time?Jeremy: That wasn’t the plan for that day. At all…Greg: We had a setlist written, but we didn’t play it. [laughs] And keep in mind, this also was a Sunday show… Apparently, you’re not supposed to miss any of those…Andrew: I’ve heard that, yeah…Greg: The sound was really good the night before. Kind of just on a whim, we said, “Let’s start with this song, and if it’s not going great, we can close the song and play our set, but if it’s going well, let’s take it out there and see where it goes.” … And fortunately, there weren’t many stale moments. And I think we all recognized as a group that if we reached the end of one section, one of us needed to make a move to change up the groove or change up the feel or the chords and let whoever’s playing most confidently at a transition point push it in a new direction.Jeremy: A big thing about doing a super extended jam like that is that it puts us in a very vulnerable place to the fans. You know, like, we’re gonna make mistakes [laughs] … There’s usually one moment where someone doesn’t know what’s happening. If we were really nitpicking, and it was during a [regular] song, we’d be like, “Oh my god, we totally screwed that up!” But when you’re in a free-form improvisational moment, there’s no such thing as a wrong note. You could hit something that sounds bad for a second, but then you figure it out quickly.Andrew: And it becomes the tension that leads to a release. It’s all part of the puzzle.Greg: We jam at all of our shows. The majority of our concert is improv. This particular jam was just wide open, in the sense that sometimes when we’re jamming in a song, we’re aware of where we need to end up. If we’re gonna go back and close that song or if we’re gonna transition to the next one, you kind of need to be in the right key, or build toward the right chords, things like that. That’s what made this experience different—the fact that there was no destination in the jam made it all the more special.And then what was really exciting was we found ourselves, about an hour in, floating around the key of “Funk E.”, the song we had started with, and we found our way back to it. That was really cool because that was not necessarily the plan. There was no plan. But the fact that we were able to close it was inspiring for us as a group and made it that tight one-song set.Phierce Photo | Keith Griner | 4/28/17Andrew: Definitely. It’s like in the movie, The Prestige, what Michael Caine’s character says about magic tricks: It’s not enough to just make something disappear. You have to bring it back to earn the applause…Greg: That is such a great reference! There are some fans who take their notepad out, and they write down the set so they can post it in our Facebook group, The Flock. One of the kids’ notes was really funny. It was like “Funk E. … Is this still ‘Funk E.’? … ‘Holy shit, what’s going on?’” It was a good one. I’m really happy we made it unscathed, relatively, and were able to experience it and add that to our resume, of sorts. We are always pushing ourselves to do something different, to do something more. This was something we’d never done before, and I look forward to the next thing we haven’t done before.Andrew: Speaking of the next things you haven’t done before…You were supposed to make your Red Rocks debut last year with moe., and obviously Rob Derhak got sick and that got postponed. Now Rob’s better, moe.’s back in action, the show’s rescheduled, and you’re finally heading to play Red Rocks…Greg: Allegedly. I mean, we’re scheduled for it again. [laughs] … After experiencing getting the Red Rocks offer and then having it be taken away, for very good reason, it made me realize that you only “play Red Rocks” once you’ve actually played Red Rocks. So…[laughs]…July 12th, we’re both very stoked, and once it’s in the books, we will revel in it.Phierce Photo | Keith Griner | 7/23/17Phierce Photo | Keith Griner | 7/23/17Pigeons Playing Ping Pong‘s 9th-annual Domefest takes place May 17th – 19th. For more information, or to purchase tickets, head to the festival website.last_img read more

New Data Protection Capabilities that Enable Your Cloud Strategy

first_imgIt’s Day One of Dell EMC World–and we are excited to announce enhancements to our portfolio that further broaden our cloud data protection capabilities, adding two new uses cases for Disaster Recovery to the cloud and Protection Storage in the cloud.Many organizations today have been given a mandate to have some percentage of their IT infrastructure in the cloud.  In fact, IDC states that 70 percent of CIOs have a “cloud first” strategy.  With increasing amounts of mission-critical data being moved to the cloud, it cannot be taken for granted that this data is protected. Data in the cloud requires the same level of protection as any other workload, across applications and meeting the most stringent recovery objectives.  This is why Dell EMC offers a comprehensive portfolio of multi-cloud data protection solutions.  Currently, more than 150 PB of data in the cloud is managed by Dell EMC Data Protection technology.The combination of Data Domain and the Data Protection Suite can now deliver best-of-breed disaster recovery to the cloud.  With Data Domain Cloud Disaster Recovery, organizations are able protect their on premises Data Domain using Data Protection Suite by transferring data securely and efficiently into AWS S3 for disaster recovery, eliminating the need for an additional data center and taking advantage of the agility and cost effectiveness of cloud object storage. Data Domain Cloud Disaster Recovery requires minimal footprint in AWS as well as minimal compute cycles, enabling a disaster recovery solution at minimal cost. In the event of a disaster, failover is fully automated and workloads being recovered can be run directly in AWS.Additionally, customers can now gain the efficiency, reliablility and performance they expect from Data Domain in the cloud with the latest release of Data Domain Virtual Edition (DD VE).  DD VE now provides backup and recovery for traditional and emerging applications that have been moved to the cloud and cloud native applications running in Amazon Web Services (AWS) or Microsoft Azure. Data Domain replication is also supported to, from and within the cloud for additional flexibility. The latest release of the Data Protection Suite can perform orchestration, management, monitoring and reporting of these backups in the cloud further enabling users with a common experience both on-premises and in the cloud with nothing new to learn for purchase. A technology preview of DD VE in the cloud is now available through the Data Domain Community, and a try and buy option will be available when this release is generally available starting in June 2017.Whether your applications are on-premises being extended to the cloud, are born in the cloud or have been moved there, Dell EMC delivers innovative data protection solutions where and how you need them.last_img read more

The Future of Work and the CIO’s Role

first_imgI recently stumbled across an interesting article. It dealt with a topic that affects us all, one that we perhaps do not take into consideration quite enough during our day-to-day work; namely, the future of work. The contents of this article were, to put it mildly, a little unsettling. Quite some time ago, researchers at the University of Oxford discovered that almost half of all jobs could cease to exist in the years to come. In some sectors, the prospects are bleaker still. For example, these British economists actually predict that 90 percent of jobs in the insurance sector could be in jeopardy.The reason for this, according to the researchers, ultimately lies in something which has become intertwined with our everyday lives – the digital transformation. Computerization, networking, IoT, and, more recently, artificial intelligence (AI) enable a high level of automatization; this includes tasks which were previously reserved for truly intelligent beings with the power of judgement. We are all well aware of the fact that digitalization is altering numerous work processes, some of which we could not even have conceived of previously. This has not just had an impact on simple tasks, but also complex activities such as those carried out by journalists, lawyers, or doctors. Even though we still have a lot riding on ideas and projects, we have to ask ourselves whether there will be detrimental long-term impacts on working society. Will intelligent machines really replace the workforce in the near future?Economics would not be described as a science if cases could not be refuted or seen from different perspectives. Accordingly, the aforementioned article refers to researchers from the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), who came to the conclusion that the degree of automation of activities is nowhere near as high as this; according to their calculations, in all OECD countries, only nine percent of jobs on average are under threat. In Germany, the figure is approximately 12 percent. Indeed, this is significantly lower, but I do not find it particularly reassuring, as we are still talking about the livelihoods of five million people in our country.Is it inevitable that technological progress will axe jobs? If you think back to the last technical revolution, which many of us even experienced ourselves, the introduction of PCs in the 80s led to extensive computerization and, to some extent, the first stage of digitalization. Ultimately, this resulted in more jobs, not fewer. This was not just because we needed more software developers, system administrators, database experts, and IT consultants; the PC also initiated a whole host of new processes and business models, and whole new sectors emerged, too. The article also includes the following statement: “In 20 years, 80 percent of jobs will have been destroyed”. This originally comes from an edition of the SPIEGEL magazine dated 17 April 1979.But can we simply apply these past developments to today’s world? Or does digitalization have the power to sweep away everything we have learned? Perhaps the disruption we are seeing means that these kinds of analogies no longer apply, since AI may be redefining everything. That would mean that we have just about reached the point where this is like reading tea leaves; it is futile to speculate about it. As I see it, approaching the future does not mean waiting for what either does or does not happen, but rather taking an active part in shaping it.Regarding the subject of the workforce, this can only mean improving mobility, diversity, and creativity. We have to help workers to achieve their full potential and, above all, we have to put them in a position where they can comprehensively work with new technologies, from IoT, to cloud computing, to AI. If, for example, 44 percent of workers are of the opinion that their workplaces do not yet provide enough intelligent equipment, this also shows that many of those who are greatly affected by the workforce changes actually think that more technology should be implemented. When it comes to technology, it really depends on how you use it.In this environment, CIOs face completely new challenges, precisely because the essential leverage during the upcoming changes is to make use of technology. This means that the CIO does not just act as an interface between IT and business. With their high level of technical expertise and social skills, they also are a key component in the relationship between IT and employees. The CIO is the go-to expert on implementing technology in the workplace. Therefore, their competence in this role is crucial for employees’ working potential, both now and in the future.To learn more about the new job profile of a CIO, how current CIOs can prepare for this role, and which key challenges await them, please refer to our new Connected CIO booklet, which is available for download at https://www.dellemc.com/en-gb/digital-transformation/connected-cio.htm.last_img read more

Race Ahead: No Tubes Iron Cross XII Ultra Cross Event

first_imgUltracross/Monster Cross, October 5, 2014 in Shippensburg, PennsylvaniaThe No Tubes Iron Cross is North America’s original Ultra Cross cyclocross and mountain bike event with more than 100 km of trail racing. And there is good reason why NoTubes named their cross wheel after this granddaddy of monster cross racing. Over 100k in length and featuring the perfect mix of dirt, gravel, singletrack, pavement and ‘cross features to let know know this isn’t just another gravel road ride. The changes in terrain, features and obstacles are sure to keep you guessing about which bike is best used to conquer this race, many riders favorite event in the US UltraCX Series. The beautiful Michaux State Forest in south-central PA plays host to this event in early October, and there is no better time of year to enjoy the ridges and valleys of Pennsylvania than as cooler temps and fall colors begin to burst forth in the forest.Race starts at 9 a.m. and is limited to 400 participants.Race Contact:Name: Mike KuhnEmail: TransSylvaniaEpic@gmail.comPhone: 717-350-1029Visit OutdoorExperience.org for more information.Basic CMYKlast_img read more

Trail Mix – Leftover Salmon

first_imgI first remember hearing the name Leftover Salmon in the mid-nineties after moving to Charlottesville. I can still see the photocopied handbill – printed on a violent shade of purple – stapled on a telephone pole outside a record shop on the Corner. I later caught the band for the first time at the old pavilion there on the Downtown Mall and have been a fan ever since.For over twenty-five years, these genre-bending godfathers of jam – led by Vince Herman and Drew Emmitt – have been touring the country with their own take on bluegrassy country music, regularly whipping crowds into a frenzy with extended jams and frenetic solos.Last week, Leftover Salmon released Something Higher, their latest collection of new tunes. Trail Mix is happy to feature “Southern Belle” off the new record this month.Coinciding with the release of the new record is a partnership with a number of superb adventure gear companies that led to the creation of the Something Higher line of products. The band collaborated with Meier Skis, Winterstick Snowboards, Osprey Backpacks, and EcoVessel to create a collection of gear that exemplifies Leftover Salmon’s status as a true mountain band.I recently caught up with banjo player – and native North Carolinian – Andy Thorn to chat about the new record, salmon recipes, the Something Higher gear partnerships, and a shared appreciation for handmade American denim.BRO – I love that Pointer Brand coat you are rocking the latest band pic. Kudos for the strong denim game.AT – Yeah, we were playing a brewery near Bristol and we got to take the Pointer Brand factory tour. So cool to see an old-school denim factory like that still functioning. They were super generous and gave us a few jackets afterwards, so I rep it any time I can.BRO – Can you remember the first time you got to tell someone, “I play banjo with Leftover Salmon,” and how it felt?AT – I can’t really remember the first time telling someone I’m in the band. Really, the coolest part about being in the band is all the good memories I have from seeing them around North Carolina from the time I was fifteen. Saw them through college at UNC, at Merlfest, at Cat’s Cradle in Chapel Hill, Ziggy’s, and even a frat party at Duke. Being a part of restarting the band has been super cool and I hope we keep going for a long time.BRO – I am interested in the partnerships the band entered into with some kick-ass outdoor gear companies. I am a hiker and biker. If you had to recommend one piece of Something Higher gear for me to get my hands on, what would it be?AT – All the products are really great. The EcoVessel water bottle even has a strainer at the top so you can put loose leaf tea in it. But my favorite are the Meier skis. I got to be there while my skis were made and watching the process go down was amazing. The core is made of beetle kill wood and the glue is so ecofriendly. They are amazing skis.BRO – You love being in what you call a “mountain band.” Describe the perfect day in the mountains for me.AT – A perfect day in the mountains is waking up in Telluride, Colorado, on a powder day and getting to ski with your wife, bandmates, and hopefully a local tour guide. Then head to the Floradora for happy hour before we play a show at the Sheridan Opera House. Doesn’t get much better than that. The same pattern can be repeated in any mountain town across America. As long as there’s the outdoors, friends, and pickin’, it’s a great day in the mountains as far as I am concerned.BRO – Favorite way to prepare salmon?AT – I love grilling salmon steaks with blackening spice. The steaks have more fat so they’re way tastier than the standard filet. I’m also becoming addicted to smoked salmon belly. So good!Andy and his mates in Leftover Salmon are in the midst of a run of dates across the Southeast this weekend. Catch the band at the Aiken Bluegrass Festival tonight, the North Carolina Brewers & Music Festival tomorrow, and at the Pour House in Charleson, South Carolina, on Sunday.For more information on the new record, tour dates, or the Something Higher outdoor gear partnerships, please surf over to the band’s website.And be sure to check out “Southern Belle,” along with tracks from Sarah Shook, Mat Kearney, Kerri Powers, Luke Winslow-King, and more on this month’s Trail Mix.last_img read more

Peruvian Navy Ship Completes Second Training Cruise

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo November 20, 2017 The expedition took the Peruvian Navy training ship through Pacific, Atlantic, and Caribbean waters. On November 5th, 2017, the BAP Union concluded its second Training Trip Abroad (VIEX, per its Spanish acronym) and returned to its home port at the Callao Naval Base after traveling 18,000 miles in six months. “You have returned healthy, better people, and sailors,” Peruvian Minister of Defense Jorge Nieto Montesinos said to cadets who participated in the trip. Accompanied by Admiral Gonzalo Nicolás Ríos Polastri, general commander of the Peruvian Navy (MGP, per its Spanish acronym), Nieto welcomed the 347 crew members, including 83 third-year cadets from the Naval School of Peru. Training on the high seas “I have the privilege, along with this promotion, to be one of the few to have this training,” Cadet Richard Valdez Ticona said upon arrival. For his part, Cadet Fernando Luque Pereyra highlighted the leadership of the BAP Union officers. “It’s been hard work, but this is a team,” Cadet Pereyra said. “There was trust from the officers […]. In my case, I feel that we’ve had some first class officers, excellent professionals whom I hope to meet in the future and work with.” The Union’s second training trip was the first to make a stop in Europe. The ship set off from Callao on May 11th and visited 18 ports in 12 countries: Balboa and Colón, Panamá; Jacksonville, Norfolk, and Boston, United States; Charlottetown, Canada; London, England; Hamburg, Germany; Rotterdam, Holland; Le Havre, France; La Coruña, Cádiz, and Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain; Lisbon, Portugal; Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; Guayaquil, Ecuador; and Paita, Peru. While at sea, cadets received a theoretical and practical training to strengthen their maritime skills in real-life conditions. Students learned to work as a team and participated in lessons on celestial navigation, meteorology, oceanography, and sail maneuvers. “We started with a training phase: they took the sailing training ship course for 20 days until we arrived at the port of Jacksonville [United States],” MGP Captain Franz Bittrich Ramírez, ship commander, told Diálogo. “Then we started training in teams at each mast.” A multifaceted mission In addition to being a training cruise, the BAP Union fulfills a diplomatic mission and promotes cooperation and friendship among the armed forces of partner nations. As such, in addition to Peruvian officers, cadets, technical personnel and seamen, the ship’s crew included officers from Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, and Canada. The ship served as a roaming embassy and shared Peruvian culture with the thousands of people who came on board. Military and civilian officials from each country welcomed crew members, who participated in various events and cultural visits, such as to navy museums. They also paid the traditional homage to MGP Admiral Miguel Grau in foreign ports where a bust of the Peruvian naval hero is found. “[Being in] these 12 countries gave me a cultural education, [allowed me to] become a man of the world,” Cadet Valdez said. “You learn nautical, maritime training, and apart from that, it’s a source of pride to have a Peruvian waiting for you in each port.” Built to stand out In its voyage around the world, the ship also took part in various maritime events, which served as training for cadets. At the mid-June Sail Boston 2017 naval parade in the United States, the BAP Union won the Tall Ships category. In Canada, the ship won first place of Race 4 at the Rendez-Vous 2017 Tall Ships Regatta that celebrated Canada’s 150-year anniversary. In addition to theoretical lessons, “the training served to win the competition,” said Capt. Bittrich. Launched in December 2014, the four-masted ship BAP Union is more than 115 meters long, 13.5 meters wide, and has 34 sails. The BAP Union also has a displacement of 3,200 tons and reaches a speed of 12 knots. The sailing ship, built in the Navy Industrial Services Shipyard with the support of Spain, is the second largest training ship in the world. A way of life A touching moment at the return of the BAP Union occurred when four of its crew members met their children born during the mission. “It’s very gratifying to see my son after a long voyage,” said Technical Helmsman Yosep Cántaro García. “I found out he was born July 19th when we were sailing through London, and I was quite emotional.” Second Lieutenant Diego Zárate García was thankful. “I couldn’t be with my daughter for six months, but now I’m very happy.” For Capt. Bittrich, joining MGP can be summarized in one simple sentence: “The Navy is not a job but a way of life, and one needs to make sacrifices for life.” The planning process for the third BAP Union mission is already underway. It will include four months of planning and navigation tests in March 2018. The captain indicated his satisfaction with the second completed mission. “I feel confident that the Navy’s future is assured with these cadets,” he concluded. “We are delivering a cohesive group to the Naval School, with firm values and convictions.” The expedition took the Peruvian Navy training ship through Pacific, Atlantic, and Caribbean waters. On November 5th, 2017, the BAP Union concluded its second Training Trip Abroad (VIEX, per its Spanish acronym) and returned to its home port at the Callao Naval Base after traveling 18,000 miles in six months. “You have returned healthy, better people, and sailors,” Peruvian Minister of Defense Jorge Nieto Montesinos said to cadets who participated in the trip. Accompanied by Admiral Gonzalo Nicolás Ríos Polastri, general commander of the Peruvian Navy (MGP, per its Spanish acronym), Nieto welcomed the 347 crew members, including 83 third-year cadets from the Naval School of Peru. Training on the high seas “I have the privilege, along with this promotion, to be one of the few to have this training,” Cadet Richard Valdez Ticona said upon arrival. For his part, Cadet Fernando Luque Pereyra highlighted the leadership of the BAP Union officers. “It’s been hard work, but this is a team,” Cadet Pereyra said. “There was trust from the officers […]. In my case, I feel that we’ve had some first class officers, excellent professionals whom I hope to meet in the future and work with.” The Union’s second training trip was the first to make a stop in Europe. The ship set off from Callao on May 11th and visited 18 ports in 12 countries: Balboa and Colón, Panamá; Jacksonville, Norfolk, and Boston, United States; Charlottetown, Canada; London, England; Hamburg, Germany; Rotterdam, Holland; Le Havre, France; La Coruña, Cádiz, and Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain; Lisbon, Portugal; Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; Guayaquil, Ecuador; and Paita, Peru. While at sea, cadets received a theoretical and practical training to strengthen their maritime skills in real-life conditions. Students learned to work as a team and participated in lessons on celestial navigation, meteorology, oceanography, and sail maneuvers. “We started with a training phase: they took the sailing training ship course for 20 days until we arrived at the port of Jacksonville [United States],” MGP Captain Franz Bittrich Ramírez, ship commander, told Diálogo. “Then we started training in teams at each mast.” A multifaceted mission In addition to being a training cruise, the BAP Union fulfills a diplomatic mission and promotes cooperation and friendship among the armed forces of partner nations. As such, in addition to Peruvian officers, cadets, technical personnel and seamen, the ship’s crew included officers from Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, and Canada. The ship served as a roaming embassy and shared Peruvian culture with the thousands of people who came on board. Military and civilian officials from each country welcomed crew members, who participated in various events and cultural visits, such as to navy museums. They also paid the traditional homage to MGP Admiral Miguel Grau in foreign ports where a bust of the Peruvian naval hero is found. “[Being in] these 12 countries gave me a cultural education, [allowed me to] become a man of the world,” Cadet Valdez said. “You learn nautical, maritime training, and apart from that, it’s a source of pride to have a Peruvian waiting for you in each port.” Built to stand out In its voyage around the world, the ship also took part in various maritime events, which served as training for cadets. At the mid-June Sail Boston 2017 naval parade in the United States, the BAP Union won the Tall Ships category. In Canada, the ship won first place of Race 4 at the Rendez-Vous 2017 Tall Ships Regatta that celebrated Canada’s 150-year anniversary. In addition to theoretical lessons, “the training served to win the competition,” said Capt. Bittrich. Launched in December 2014, the four-masted ship BAP Union is more than 115 meters long, 13.5 meters wide, and has 34 sails. The BAP Union also has a displacement of 3,200 tons and reaches a speed of 12 knots. The sailing ship, built in the Navy Industrial Services Shipyard with the support of Spain, is the second largest training ship in the world. A way of life A touching moment at the return of the BAP Union occurred when four of its crew members met their children born during the mission. “It’s very gratifying to see my son after a long voyage,” said Technical Helmsman Yosep Cántaro García. “I found out he was born July 19th when we were sailing through London, and I was quite emotional.” Second Lieutenant Diego Zárate García was thankful. “I couldn’t be with my daughter for six months, but now I’m very happy.” For Capt. Bittrich, joining MGP can be summarized in one simple sentence: “The Navy is not a job but a way of life, and one needs to make sacrifices for life.” The planning process for the third BAP Union mission is already underway. It will include four months of planning and navigation tests in March 2018. The captain indicated his satisfaction with the second completed mission. “I feel confident that the Navy’s future is assured with these cadets,” he concluded. “We are delivering a cohesive group to the Naval School, with firm values and convictions.”last_img read more

Against Me! To Unleash Transgender Dysphoria Blues & More At The Paramount

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Ellie SchoeffelPunk rock rebels Against Me!, known for intensely personal albums and an explosive, genre-bending sound, hits The Paramount in Huntington Thursday, March 16 for an unforgettable night of its trademark supersonic hybrid of impassioned and introspective pop, folk, rock and country.Before its formation into a full-fledged punk band, Against Me! was a solo acoustic project by frontwoman Laura Jane Grace, whose decision to come out as transgender in 2012 abandoning her birth name Tom Gabel to live as a woman inspired a whole new strand of music, including 2014’s Transgender Dysphoria Blues. Although her roster of bandmates has rotated throughout the years, she and guitarist James Bowman, bassist Inge Johansson and drummer Atom Willard demonstrate the immense, transformative power of loose concept albums, with 2016’s Shape Shift with Me chronicling world travel and love, narrated by Grace. The group is also known for hit songs “Thrash Unreal,” “I Was a Teenage Anarchist” and “True Trans Soul Rebel.”Grace states of her life journey expressed in her music, sharing in a past interview: “I had gone from being married with a kid, two cars, garage, nice house in a nice neighborhood to all of it gone. But from an artistic standpoint, it broke down this fucking wall where there’s no filter. I’m feeling stuff emotionally and just processing it.” Grace channels the feeling of loss in her former life and combines it with embrace of a new world of possibilities, unleashing all of its associated emotions and feelings into the band’s music, which embodies the “break down walls” spirit.Five years after her groundbreaking confession, Grace and her band continue to create social commentaries and obliterate walls, figuratively and literally, especially in this new political age of controversy in America. Grace’s take on transgender legislation has been recently widely publicized, and with a tour in collaboration with Green Day set for Spring 2017, Against Me! shows that they aren’t planning on stopping anytime soon, and will continue to voice their opinions on politics and identity issues through their music, and that’s something everyone can celebrate!Against Me! rocks The Paramount, at 370 New York Ave. in Huntington, on March 16! Visit paramountny.com for tickets and more information!last_img read more

‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse thrills skywatchers on longest day

first_imgCoronavirus hits viewing Without the coronavirus pandemic, they would have organized a trip to Lake Magadi in southern Kenya where the skies are generally clearer than over the capital.”With the pandemic situation, we’re not able to have crowds… and get kids to look through or do stuff,” she said, but still managed to share the event on social media.The annular eclipse is visible from only about two percent of Earth’s surface, Florent Delefie, an astronomer at the Paris Observatory, told AFP.”It’s a bit like switching from a 500-watt to a 30-watt light bulb,” he added. “It’s a cold light and you don’t see as well.”Sri Lanka closed its planetarium to prevent a gathering of amateur astronomers due to the coronavirus outbreak, but live-streamed the celestial event on Facebook.A small group of about 15 students huddled around a telescope at the University of Colombo to watch the eclipse.Some students used a welding mask to stare at the sun, while others wore glasses made with filters that cut out ultra-violet rays.Coronavirus precautions were also taken in Nepal’s capital, Kathmandu, as dozens of students and astronomy enthusiasts gathered on a rooftop.Only a few were allowed at the viewing area at a time, wearing masks and sanitizing their hands as they waited their turn.”I was worried because it is a cloudy day, but the view was excellent,” 19-year-old student Swechhya Gurung told AFP.In Hong Kong, dozens of skywatchers ranging from astronomy enthusiasts with telescopes to families enjoying Father’s Day gathered at a waterfront park in east Kowloon to witness the spectacle, which lasted about 90 minutes. Lunar eclipse to follow Cheers erupted from the crowd when the cloud cleared and the eclipse was clearly visible.The full eclipse was visible at successive locations over a period of nearly four hours, and one of the last places to see the partially hidden Sun was Taiwan.A solar eclipse always occurs around two weeks before or after a lunar eclipse, when the Moon moves into Earth’s shadow. Lunar eclipses are visible from about half of the Earth’s surface.A lunar eclipse is due on July 5, with the best viewing over North and South America, southern Europe and Africa.There will be a second solar eclipse in 2020 on December 14 over South America. Because the Moon will be a bit closer to Earth, it will block out the Sun’s light entirely.  Topics : Sunday’s eclipse arrived on the northern hemisphere’s longest day of the year — the summer solstice — when the North Pole is tilted most directly towards the Sun.It was first visible in northeastern Republic of Congo from 5:56 local time (04:56 GMT) just a few minutes after sunrise. That was the point of maximum duration, with the blackout lasting a minute and 22 seconds.Arcing eastward across Africa and Asia, it reached “maximum eclipse” — with a perfect solar halo around the Moon — over Uttarakhand, India near the Sino-Indian border at 12:10 local time (0640 GMT).center_img More spectacular, but less long-lived: the exact alignment of the Earth, Moon and Sun was visible for only 38 seconds.In Nairobi, East Africa, observers saw only a partial eclipse as clouds blocked the sky for several seconds at the exact moment the Moon should have almost hidden the Sun.Despite some disappointment, Susan Murbana told AFP: “It was very exciting because I think I’m so obsessed with eclipses.”Today has been very kind to us in terms of the clouds. And we’ve been able to see most of it,” said Murbana who set up the Travelling Telescope educational program with her husband Chu. Skywatchers along a narrow band from west Africa to the Arabian Peninsula, India and the Far East witnessed a dramatic “ring of fire” solar eclipse Sunday.So-called annular eclipses occur when the Moon — passing between Earth and the Sun — is not quite close enough to our planet to completely obscure sunlight, leaving a thin ring of the solar disc visible.They happen every year or two, and can only be seen from a narrow pathway across the planet.last_img read more

Indonesian track and field legend Eduardus Nabunome dies over heart attack

first_imgIndonesian track and field legend Eduardus Nabunome died on Monday at the Harapan Kita Hospital where he was being treated following a heart attack.“Coach Edu suffered a heart attack while running at the Gelora Bung Karno stadium,” Kurniasih Budi, mother of one of the members of Eduard’s athletics club, told kompas.com on Monday.Eduardus’ family has not yet decided whether to bury him in Jakarta or in his hometown in East Nusa Tenggara. It was previously reported that Eduardus had been receiving treatment at Medistra Hospital since Saturday for a heart condition.It was the second time Eduardus had been hospitalized for the condition. He spent several days in Pasar Rebo General Hospital in 2017 after suffering a heart attack.Eduardus’ wife, Marcelina Ina Piran, said he had been closely monitored by doctors and had tested negative for COVID-19.Marcelina added that members of the running community who were being trained by Eduardus were working together to cover his medical bills.“We have been informed by Jakarta’s track and field association through its chief Pak Mustara that the association is going to talk to the insurance company,” she said as quoted by tribunnews.com.Eduardus won the 1,000 meters long-distance running category at the 1987, 1989 and 1991 Southeast Asian Games. He also secured gold in the 5,000m category in the 1987 and 1989 games. Topics :last_img read more

Arsenal confirm backroom shake-up as Unai Emery replaces Steve Bould with Freddie Ljungberg

first_img Comment Ljungberg will now work alongside Unai Emery and the rest of the first-team staff (Picture: Getty)A statement from the club explained: ‘Our goal is to create a “transition team” which will collectively manage a player’s development through some of the hardest and most challenging periods of their professional lives.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘The aim is to create a clear framework for our young players to fulfil their potential at the highest level.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CitySpeaking about his new role, Ljungberg said: ‘I’m really excited by this opportunity to continue helping develop and work with some of the great young players we have coming through in the first-team environment and to work alongside Unai and his coaching team to help Arsenal win trophies.‘I’m looking forward to working in this new structure and to pass on my experience and knowledge about what is needed to succeed at this level.’ Advertisement Arsenal confirm backroom shake-up as Unai Emery replaces Steve Bould with Freddie Ljungberg Arsenal hope the coaching changes will help develop the club’s young players (Picture: Getty)Bould added: ‘I have always had a deep commitment to developing young players and am delighted to be back working in an area which is so important to the future of our club. We have great young players and my job will be to help them maximise their potential.’The changes will come into effect from the start of July, with goalkeeping coach Sal Bibbo also taking on extra responsibilities to help young goalkeepers transition to senior football.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenalcenter_img Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterMonday 17 Jun 2019 1:46 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link656Shares The long-serving assistant will drop down to the Under-23s (Picture: Getty)Arsenal have announced a number of significant changes to the makeup of their coaching staff, with long-time assistant Steve Bould replaced by Freddie Ljungberg.The former Gunners star, who was part of the famous Invincibles title-winning side, was in charge of the under-23s last season and impressed Arsenal’s hierarchy, earning a new role as assistant first-team coach – though will still have a focus on youth development.Bould previously ran the academy sides for 11 years under Arsene Wenger and will now lead the under-23s, working alongside academy manager Per Mertesacker as well as Ljungberg.last_img read more