Tag: 2019年最新凤楼信息已经更新

PPP distances self from online poll for presidential candidate

first_imgAs Guyanese gear up to head to elections before 2020, an online poll has surfaced on social media allowing users to select their choice for the presidential candidate for the People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C).However, the Party’s executives have dismissed this latest development even questioning whether or not it could be mischievous in nature. This comes with the recent passage of an Opposition-filed no-confidence motion, which meant that the PPP had to fast track its selection process for a presidential candidate since elections will have to be called in 90 days as mandated by the Constitution of Guyana.As the PPP’s Executive Committee of 35 members selects one eligible leader, the poll attributed to ‘Guyana Independent Voices’ appeared, but the PPP’s Executive Secretary, Zulfikar Mustapha told Guyana Times on Monday that his party has not signed off on any poll.PPP Executive Secretary Zulfikar Mustapha“The Party has not put out any poll and has not sanctioned any poll … that will not influence the Party,” Mustapha asserted.The poll included the pictures and names of proposed front-runners such as former Housing Minister Irfaan Ali, former Attorney General Anil Nandlall, Dr Vindyha Persaud, Dr Frank Anthony and Opposition Chief Whip Gail Teixeira. Now that one week has passed since the selection process for a new candidate started, Mustapha advised that the poll would not affect the overall process that the Party has to follow.“How that will influence anything in the process? We have an established process that started in 2011 and that is what we will follow all the time and we didn’t have a poll in 2011, and I don’t know who put up that poll – if it’s anybody who wants to create mischief, or they want to fragment candidates and leaders in the Party,” he stated.Mustapha insisted that there was no fragmentation within the PPP’s top ranks.last_img read more

Manchester City F.C. thrash Watford to ensure third place in Premier League

first_imgManchester City made sure of third place in the Premier League when they romped to a 5-0 win at Watford on Sunday to ensure a Champions League berth for next season.City were already 4-0 up at the break at Vicarage Road and finish the season with 78 points, ahead of Liverpool and Arsenal and behind Chelsea and Tottenham Hotspur.They had needed only a point to ensure they would go straight into the group phase of the Champions League but quickly set about making sure of a strong finish to a trophy-less season.Kompany opened the scoring with a fifth-minute header from a corner, followed by Sergio Aguero finishing off a counter attack set up by Kevin de Bruyne in the 23rd minute.Thirteen minutes later Aguero netted his 33rd goal of the season at the end of another quick attack with Leroy Sane providing the decisive pass.It was 4-0 in the 41st minute as Fernandinho powered through the defence to score from close range with another Brazilian, Gabriel Jesus, adding a fifth goal 13 minutes after the break.”I am so happy, we go direct to Europe. Now we must reduce the gap to the elite in Europe and in the Premier League. We must play better,” said manager Pep Guardiola.”Congratulations to Chelsea and to Tottenham, we are so glad to be third. (We are) not a club with history of playing in Europe like United or Arsenal. But now we are there five or six years and now we can try to close the gap on the elite.advertisement”The best team in Europe will be at the Etihad next season. I don’t know what we need to add. This is one of the best groups I have ever trained, they never gave up. It was a pleasure to be with them.”The match was the last for Watford manager Walter Mazzarri with his club finishing one place above the relegation standings after 38 games.His departure was announced last week but any hopes of a major scalp on the last day of the season evaporated quickly and he was jeered by his own fans during the game and failed to join an end-of-match lap of the stadium by his players.last_img read more

WilsonRaybould says she put justice ahead of politics in SNCLavalin affair

first_imgJustin BrakeAPTN NewsJody Wilson-Raybould says her experiences as an Indigenous person and the values she was raised with are what drove her to challenge the highest echelons of power in Canada over the SNC-Lavalin case.“The history of Crown-Indigenous relations in this country includes a history of the rule of law not being respected,” she said.The former justice minister and attorney general testified Wednesday that she came under relentless pressure — including veiled threats — from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his senior staff, the top public servant and Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s office to halt a criminal prosecution of Montreal engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.And she says she believes she was shuffled out of the prestigious justice portfolio to veterans affairs in January because she refused to give in to it.Wilson-Raybould made the stunning and detailed accusations in testimony Wednesday before the House of Commons justice committee, breaking three weeks of silence on the affair that has rocked the government, prompting her resignation from cabinet and the departure of Gerald Butts, Trudeau’s most trusted adviser.Read: Opening Statement of Jody Wilson-Raybould Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, speaking immediately after Wilson-Raybould’s testimony finished, said Trudeau had lost the moral authority to govern the country and should resign.He also called for a police investigation of Wilson-Raybould’s claims.NDP leader Jagmeet Singh said Trudeau “may need to resign,” but focused his message on reiterating his party’s call for a public inquiry, which he says would shine more light on the controversy.Speaking at an event in St. Hubert, Que. Wednesday evening, Trudeau denied any wrongdoing.“I strongly maintain, as I have from the beginning, that I and my staff have always acted appropriately and professionally. I therefore completely disagree with the former attorney general’s characterization of events.”Pressed by reporters on details contained in Wilson-Raybould’s testimony, Trudeau said he had not yet had a chance to listen to it in its entirety.(Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer is calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to resign. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)Wilson-Raybould told the committee she was “hounded” to end the prosecution for months after the director of public prosecutions, Kathleen Roussel, had rejected the idea of negotiating a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin and long after she had unequivocally declared that she would not direct Roussel to reverse her decision.“For a period of approximately four months, between September and December of 2018, I experienced a consistent and sustained effort by many people within the government to seek to politically interfere in the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in my role as the attorney general of Canada,” she told the committee.Nevertheless, Wilson-Raybould said she didn’t consider resigning at the time and didn’t directly raise her concerns with Trudeau after Sept. 17, when she first informed him that she believed it would be inappropriate for her to intervene in the SNC-Lavalin matter.She said she didn’t speak directly to Trudeau about SNC-Lavalin again until Jan. 7, when he informed her he was about to move her out of the justice portfolio and she suggested the move was the result of her refusal to intervene in the prosecution, which he denied.She accepted a move to veterans affairs on Jan. 14 and did not resign from cabinet until Feb. 11, five days after an anonymously sourced allegation that she’d been improperly pressured first surfaced in the Globe and Mail.“At the time, I did not see it as my responsibility to resign. I saw myself as the attorney general of the country who was doing her job to ensure and uphold the independence of the prosecutor and uphold the integrity of the justice system and the rule of law.’’After she was moved out of that role, Wilson-Raybould said she would have resigned immediately had her successor in the justice portfolio, David Lametti, issued a directive to Roussel to negotiate a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin — which the attorney general is lawfully entitled to do, as long as that the directive is published in the official record of government decisions, the Canada Gazette.Trudeau has said there were vigorous discussions within government about the SNC-Lavalin case but that he repeatedly assured Wilson-Raybould that a decision on intervening to halt the prosecution was hers alone.She disputed that version of events, saying Trudeau only offered some vague assurance after she confronted him directly at the Sept. 17 meeting, two weeks after Roussel had decided not to consider a remediation agreement.“The prime minister asked me to help out, to find a solution here for SNC, citing that if there was no [remediation agreement] there would be many jobs lost and that SNC would move from Montreal,” Wilson-Raybould said.(NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is calling for a public inquiry into the SNC-Lavalin affair. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)She said she explained the law to Trudeau and told him she “had made up my mind” to not intervene with Roussel.But she said Trudeau and Privy Council clerk Michael Wernick continued to express concerns, with Wernick noting that Quebec was holding an election in a couple of weeks and Trudeau stressing that he is himself a Quebec MP.“I was quite taken aback,” she said, adding that she looked Trudeau in the eye and asked, “Are you politically interfering with my role, my decision as the attorney general? … The prime minister said, ‘No, no, no, we just need to find a solution.’”Wilson-Raybould detailed instances of what she considered inappropriate pressure by Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s chief of staff and others but said the pressure campaign escalated over the fall, even after SNC-Lavalin went to court to challenge Roussel’s rejection of a remediation agreement.Her chief of staff, Jessica Prince, was eventually summoned to an urgent Dec. 18 meeting with Trudeau’s chief of staff, Katie Telford, and his principal secretary, Gerald Butts.Citing text messages from Prince sent to her immediately after the meeting, Wilson-Raybould said the prime minister’s top two aides wanted her to hire an external legal expert, possibly a retired Supreme Court justice, to give an opinion on the appropriateness of directing Roussel to reverse her decision on the SNC-Lavalin prosecution.When Prince suggested that would be interference, Butts purportedly said, “Jess, there is no solution here that does not involve some interference.”Telford said an external legal opinion would give the government “cover” and allow Trudeau to say he was doing something. She also offered to line up op-eds in the media supporting a decision to intervene in the prosecution, according to the texts.But the most egregious pressure came the following day, on Dec. 19, when Wilson-Raybould said she received what she deemed to be three “veiled threats” that she could lose her job from the clerk of the Privy Council, Wernick.The country’s top civil servant last week told the committee he believes there was no improper pressure applied to Wilson-Raybould by him or anyone else.According to Wilson-Raybould, Wernick told her that Trudeau wanted to know why SNC-Lavalin was not being offered a remediation agreement, a kind of plea bargain that would allow the company to avoid the potentially crippling impact of a criminal conviction.He told her that the prime minister was “going to find a way to get it done one way or the other” and that it was not good for the attorney general to be “at loggerheads” with the prime minister.(Jody Wilson-Raybould leaves the committee after testifying for nearly four hours. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)In all, Wilson-Raybould said pressure was exerted on her or her staff by 11 people through approximately 10 phone calls, 10 meetings and numerous emails and text messages.They repeatedly raised concerns about the risks to SNC-Lavalin’s viability if it were convicted of corruption and fraud in relation to work it sought in Libya.Moreover, she said they were worried that the company might decide to move its operations out of Quebec, affecting last fall’s provincial election in Quebec and potentially hurting more Liberals in the province, including Trudeau, in the coming federal election this fall.She said she was told repeatedly the decision was up to her, but attempts to talk her into a remediation agreement were relentless.Concluding her half hour opening statement, Wilson-Raybould said her understanding of the rule of law has been shaped by her experiences as an Indigenous person.“Indeed, one of the main reasons for the urgent need for justice and reconciliation today is that in the history of our country we have not always upheld foundational values, such as the rule of law, in relations to Indigenous peoples. And I have seen the negative impacts for freedom, equality and a just society this can have first hand.“I was taught to always be careful of what you say, because you cannot take it back,” she continued. “And I was taught to always hold true to your core values and principles and to act with integrity. These are the teachings of my parents, grandparents and community.“I come from a long line of matriarchs and I am a truth teller in accordance with the laws and traditions of our Big House.“This is who I am and who I will always be.”jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenews-with files from the Canadian Presslast_img read more