Tag: 阿拉爱上海最新地址

Modernising SA’s air traffic networks

first_img29 May 2013 South Africa’s Air Traffic Navigation Services Company (ATNS) and French multinational aerospace technology firm Thales have signed several contracts in a partnership to modernise the country’s air traffic networks. ATNS is the sole provider of air traffic, navigation, training and associated services in South Africa and is also responsible for air traffic control for about 10% of the world’s airspace. It currently operates at 22 aerodromes around the country, including OR Tambo, Cape Town and King Shaka International Airports Thales will replace the current air traffic navigation services management systems with the Thales TopSky-ATC (air traffic control) system, as well as install the newest Thales 970s radars at ATNS’s Wakkerstroom, Potgieterus and Rhodes radar sites. Under the agreements, Thales will also provide maintenance and support for all existing ATNS radar sensors and the TopSky-ATC systems used by the Air Traffic Navigation Services Company. “South Africa is emerging as one of the fastest growing and complex air traffic management regions in the continent,” Thales South Africa chief executive officer, Patrick Oszczeda, said in a statement last week. In the last 10 years African air traffic has increased dramatically, with South Africa being one of the busiest airspaces on the continent. It is necessary to improve management, advance technologies and modernise systems as a result. “This technology acquisition will allow ATNS to deploy a truly future-proofed technology capable of not only dealing with the issues and challenges of Africa today, but also capable of growing and adapting as the airspace becomes more complex,” Oszczeda said. The two organisations are also exploring further partnerships to unlock growth and development opportunities in South Africa. “In delivering services to our customers and stakeholders, technology infrastructure and innovation play an important role in ensuring that we are able to do so,” said acting CEO of ATNS, Thabani Mthiyane. “It was therefore important for ATNS to select a partner that will not only provide enabling technology but will work with ATNS in ensuring that internal technology innovation capacity and capability is strengthened for the purpose of long-term joint development and cooperation. “This will further benefit the know-how and skills related to air traffic management in South Africa as a whole, especially in the area of technology transfer and management,” Mthiyane said. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Promising IPV Offender Interventions

first_imgBy Jay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhDCreative Commons [Flickr, Battling PTSD, May 24, 2010]In a recent blog, we highlighted a study conducted by Dr. Taft and colleagues establishing the link between PTSD and relationship problems. But, are there effective treatment solutions for perpetrators of violence?  In an article published by Dr. Taft and colleagues [1], the researchers reported on preliminary findings from an intervention that shows promise.The authors report that intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant problem in military couples – the frequency of violence for military couples may be as much as 3 times the frequency of violence in civilian intimate relationships.  There is limited information on the effectiveness of interventions for IPV. When the preliminary study of the Strength at Home intervention was published, the authors indicated that there were no empirically validated studies of IPV interventions in military couples.The Strength at Home model uses a cognitive-behavioral intervention in a group setting.  The 12-week program uses a closed group format, meeting weekly in 2 hour sessions.  Initial sessions focus on education on IPV and common reactions to trauma.  Weeks 3 and 4 provide conflict management and assertiveness skills. The third phase focuses on identifying negative thought patterns contributing to anger and IPV, relating thoughts to core trauma issues, and coping with stress.  The final sessions include instruction on a range of effective communication skills, capped by a session focusing on the gains witnessed over the past 11 weeks.Participants in the intervention were included if they had been in a recent relationship, met DSM criteria for PTSD, had a self or collateral report of physical IPV, and provided consent to contact their female partner.  The study included 6 male participants after screening and excluding participants that did not complete the assessment, intervention, and/or follow-up.  Male physical and psychological IPV was assessed prior to initiating treatment and 6 months after treatment completion.  Their female counterparts were assessed prior to the military member’s treatment and 6 months after treatment.  Preliminary study results indicated that intervention participants:Perpetrated significantly lower physical IPV,Showed significantly lower psychological IPV, andDisplayed a significant decrease in the frequency of psychological aggression,While this study is only preliminary, the results show promise of developing a practice for treating perpetrators of IPV.  It is notable that the sample size was very small, and there was a very high drop-out rate. A randomized controlled trial of the Strength at Home intervention is currently being conducted to more systematically assess the program outcomes on a larger sample.For more information on the Strength at Home intervention, visit our website for information on Dr. Taft’s upcoming webinar.References[1] Taft, C.T., Macdonald, A., Monson, C.M., Walling, S.M., Resick, P.A., Murphy, C.M. (2013). “Strength at home” Group intervention for military population engaging in intimate partner violence: Pilot findings. Journal of Family Violence, 28(3), 225-231. DOI: 10.1007/s10896-013-9496This post was written by Jay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

Declare cow national animal: Hindu convention

first_imgPanaji: The sixth All India Hindu Convention, which kicked off at Ramnath temple in Ponda on Wednesday, passed a resolution demanding that the cow be declared the national animal. The topic for this year’s convention is ‘Need for unity of Hindu community and Saints for establishing the Hindu Nation’.Charudatta Pingale of Hindu Janajagruti Samiti (HJS) said Hindus will never get justice in the present democratic set-up and establishing a Hindu nation is the only remedy to all their problems.With regard to demands for ban on Sanatan Sanstha, Sadhwi Saraswati, president of Sanatan Dharma Prachar Seva Samiti of Chhindwada, Madhya Pradesh, warned that if a ban was imposed on the HJS and the Sanatan Sanstha, several ‘sanatans’ would grow out of it. Another resolution demanded that the Centre constitute a national history committee to remove the portions of ‘deformed’ history from all textbooks. The convention also passed a resolution demanding that Hindus be taken as members in the fact-finding committees for religious riots. The convention is being attended by representatives of Hindu organisations from across the country and from Nepal, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Ramesh Shinde, national spokesperson of HJS, said,“Pseudo democracy imposed by the British on India will have to be done away with. Prior to the arrival of the Muslim invaders and the British, India was a capable Hindu nation. Then we had the economics of Koutilya, sciences of architecture, dance. Under these circumstance, why should we prepare a separate blue print for establishing the Hindu nation? Instead, we are making a blue print to remove the pseudo democracy imposed on us by the British.”last_img read more