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False alarm for RNLI lifeboat and rescue helicopter at Mulroy Bay

first_imgThe Lough Swilly lifeboat was launched this morning following an emergency alert at Mulroy Bay.The Rescue 118 helicopter and Mulroy Bay Coastguard were involved in the search at 7.45am after a signal was received from an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB).The incident turned out to be a false alarm, as the EPIRB had become detached from a vessel. The operation was stood down after rescuers confirmed that no vessels were in difficulty.False alarm for RNLI lifeboat and rescue helicopter at Mulroy Bay was last modified: August 6th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Lough Swilly RNLIMULROY BAYRESCUE 118last_img read more

Tax incentive for companies to save energy

first_img4 December 2013The Department of Energy is introducing a tax incentive for South African companies that make measurable savings in their energy consumption.Briefing journalists in Johannesburg on Wednesday, the department’s director-general, Nelisiwe Magubane, announced the promulgation of regulations which will allow Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan, in consultation with the ministers of energy and trade and industry, to publish the tax incentive.The incentive will contribute to energy efficiency and the reduction of South Africa’s greenhouse gas emissions, Magubane said.He said the regulations would be published soon, and urged businesses to scale up their energy efficiency improvement measures so as to take advantage of the incentive.“We’re not saying to companies, reduce your energy use by simply switching off machines. We are saying, run your machines in an energy saving way.”Registration with SanediTo benefit from the incentive, companies will have to register with the South African National Energy Development Institute (Sanedi), which will administer the technical component of the incentive.Cecil Marden, chief director at the National Treasury, said the incentive would work “on the basis of quantifiable energy that you have saved expressed as kwh kilowatt hours, and for each kwh that you have saved, you will get a 45 cent tax relief.”On the projected cost of the incentive to the national fiscus, Marden said: “That is difficult to estimate right now … We will rely on Sanedi, which will collate data upfront. Once we have data from Sanedi, we will be able to quantify that.”Marden said South Africa was “a fairly energy-intensive country, and over the years some effort has been made and energy efficiency is improving. We’ve made a commitment as Treasury to support the Department of Energy to deal with energy efficiency.”The department, the Treasury, Sanedi and the South African Revenue Service will conduct workshops from January to March 2014 to help businesses understand the incentive and the registration process. Information will also be made available on www.sanedi.org.za.Private Sector Energy Efficiency ProjectThe department, together with the National Business Initiative, also launched the Private Sector Energy Efficiency Project on Wednesday.The initiative will help companies – both commercial and industrial, large and small – to identify energy savings measures, and has received financial support from the British government.This augured well for the implantation of the new tax incentive, Magubane said, adding that the government’s National Energy Efficiency Strategy set a national target of reducing South Africa’s energy intensity by 12% by 2015. The strategy had recently been reviewed and was ready to be submitted for Cabinet approval, he noted.National Business Initiative CEO Joanne Yawitch said the Private Sector Energy Efficiency Project aimed to work “with about 60 large companies and just over 1 000 medium-sized companies to support the awareness and uptake of best practice in energy management and energy efficiency”.Yawitch said the initiative would offer remote advice for small businesses, technical face-to-face support for medium-sized companies, and longer-term support of energy management and strategy for large companies.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Fifth body, a civilian, found near Shopian shootout site

first_imgFifth body of a civilian was found near the shootout site in Shopian on Monday morning, as the authorities imposed curfew-like restrictions in Shopian, Pulwama and Srinagar as a precautionary measure. “Another body has been found at a distance from the Sunday evening incident at Pahnoo Shopian,” said a Srinagar-based police spokesman.The police identified the deceased as Gowhar Ahmed Lone of Chitragam in Shopian. Lone, who was pursuing M.P.Ed at Nagpur University in Maharashtra, had four bullets on his body. The police said it has “initiated an investigation” into the incident.A total of five people, including a Lashkar-e-Taiba militant and four civilians, has been killed amid conflicting versions. The Army said a patrol came under fire around 8 p.m. and in the “retaliatory fire one militant and four of his accomplices in a car were killed.”The Army described the deceased as “over ground workers” of militants. However, the locals and the victim families claimed none of the “civilians” had any association with militants and were killed in “a cold blooded murder”.Shopian has remained tense this year as five civilians were killed in two separate firing incidents on January 10 and January 27. In both the incidents, locals accused the security forces of “indiscriminate fire”. The Army faces an FIR in the January 27 incident.Meanwhile, authorities imposed restrictions in parts of Srinagar, Pulwama and Shopian. Internet services have been barred in parts of south Kashmir as sporadic protests broke out there.All train services have been suspended. Kashmir University has cancelled all examinations. The exams of prestigious Kashmir Administrative Services were also postponed. Separatists have called for a shutdown against the incident.last_img read more

No sign of any let-up in lawyers’ strike

first_imgThere was no let-up in the lawyers’ strike in Odisha even as the Police Commissionerate here on Thursday took action against four policemen, who had allegedly assaulted a lawyer on Tuesday.Demanding arrests of the erring policemen, the agitating lawyers have decided to continue boycotting of courts indefinitely. “The situation will be reviewed on Monday,” said the High Court Bar.The day also witnessed picketing of lawyers at places in the vicinity of the High Court while lawyers across the State abstained from court works in response to a call given by the Bar Council.last_img read more

Camel finds home in Assam after long legal battle

first_imgA camel rescued from smugglers on the Bangladesh border has found a home in eastern Assam’s Sivasagar after a six-month legal battle for ownership between the State police and the authorities of the Assam State Zoo. The camel, an adult male, left the zoo in Guwahati in a truck on Monday morning for an “animal home” in eastern Assam’s Sivasagar district about 350 km away. His companion was Samiran Hatimuria, who runs the home called Aranyam.“The camel is a welcome addition to my family, whose members include emus, turkeys, guinea pigs, horses, 12 types of peafowls, five varieties of pigeons, and other animals. I hope the camel adapts to our 12-bigha home,” Mr. Hatimuria, 32, told The Hindu after reaching his village Talugaon, about 3 km from Sivasagar town.The police in western Assam’s Goalpara district had in mid-2018 rescued the camel while the animal was allegedly being transported for smuggling into Bangladesh.Like two more camels rescued from the same district in January that year, this camel, too, was shifted to the zoo.The first two camels were diagnosed as carriers of diseases that veterinarians said could put the caged animals in the zoo at risk. Zoo officials approached the Sessions Court in Goalpara after the two died six months ago.“We told the court that the zoo is not authorised to keep domestic animals and that the police should take back the third camel, which appeared healthy,” Tejas Marisamy, the zoo’s Divisional Forest Officer (DFO), said.In course of time, the local court asked the police to take the camel back. But the inability of the police to accommodate the animal left it in the zoo.In December, the zoo got in touch with Mr. Hatimuria, who had, since opening Aranyam in 2008, earned a reputation for letting his facility out to be used by the Sivasagar district wildlife officials to shelter rescued wild animals temporarily for treatment or rehabilitation in the wild.“The zoo paid for the camel’s transportation. Sustenance for the animal would be appreciated, but I can take care of him, like the others at Aranyam. My parents earn a decent living, I run a small business and we have some farm income, too,” he said.“The police should ideally provide for the camel’s fodder and care since they are legally its custodian. But we will try to work a way out,” Mr. Marisamy said.last_img read more

29 years later, Kashmir Pandit returns to jubilant welcome

first_imgA Kashmiri Pandit’s homecoming to Srinagar, 29 years after he left the State, on Thursday was met with a rousing reception from locals, infusing hope for the peaceful return of the Hindu community that had to leave the Kashmir Valley in the 1990s in the face of raging militancy.Roshan Lal Mawa, in his 70s, on Thursday threw open a shop selling dates in the volatile old city’s Zanai Kadal area, from where he hails originally. That Mr. Mawa will sell a variety of dates is also symbolic since the Muslim holy month of Ramzan is a few days away.Jubilant localsTo his surprise, decision to reopen the shop, closed for 29 years, attracted jubilant locals and fellow shopkeepers. Mr. Mawa was welcomed with the tying of a white turban around his head, a Kashmiri tradition, and many hugs were exchanged. “I have set up a thriving dry fruit business outside [Kashmir]. I lived a happy life in Delhi. But I decided to return [to Kashmir] because I missed the affection I have here, the brotherhood, the hugs and the Kashmiriyat (cultural values of the Kashmiri people). You can’t find these values anywhere in the world,” said Mr. Mawa.He was among the hundreds of members of the Kashmiri Pandit community that was forced to migrate outside the Valley as militancy spread in the 1990s. Mr. Mawa’s decision to return was not easy, given the circumstances in which he had to leave.“It was October 13, 1990. A youth entered my shop and asked for dry fruit samples. In the meantime, he pulled out a pistol and shot me four times in my abdomen. I survived. I, along with my wife, moved outside the State,” he recalled.‘Yearning to return’He said his return to his roots “reflects the general yearning of my community to return home”. But, Mr. Mawa added, “I oppose the idea of having separate colonies for Pandits. It will make us soft targets. I want my [Muslim] neighbours to take care of my children.” Leaders of regional parties joined in welcoming Mr. Mawa. “Eventually, it will be this leap of faith taken by Roshan Lal and the warmth shown by his Muslim brethren that will strengthen ties and also encourage them [Kashmiri Pandits] to return home, where they truly belong,” said Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) president and former chief minister Mehbooba Mufti.last_img read more

Managing midlife transitions

first_imgWe’re all familiar with the stereotype of the 50-year-old man who exchanges his car for a flashier model, or trades his wife in for a younger model, starts covering his baldness and wearing younger clothes or chucks in his job to go off and travel the world. Less dramatic but disruptive nonetheless, mid-lifers may resort to drinking more alcohol than before, feeling depressed and blaming themselves for their failures, or putting excess pressure (possibly psychologically damaging) on their children to excel in academics or areas such as sports and arts.Many of us spend our 40s and 50s, even after having found our place in the world, re-evaluating our lives, searching impatiently for undefined goals, driven by a deep sense of remorse for unachieved dreams or a desire to relive feelings of youthfulness. An earlier generation of psychologists attributed it to the feelings that many individuals approaching the middle age of their lives experience, faced with the sense of the passage of their youth and the nearness of their old age and impending death. The Germans have a word for it: Torschlusspanik: the fear of doors closing. Normal transitions during this period of life, such as the death of parents, the realisation of being stuck in an unsatisfying career, the onset of menopause or children leaving home often trigger off strong feelings of dissatisfaction, self-doubt and depression in some individuals.It is popularly called midlife crisis. As a result, they may experience a powerful desire to make significant changes in core aspects of their lives: career, marriage, romantic relationships, big-budget expenditures, or physical appearance.advertisementBut a midlife crisis is not inevitable and may be less common than once believed. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reported that older people in their mid-to-late 50s are generally happier, and experience less stress and worry than young adults in their 20s. Though the traditional view about ageing is that the functions of the body and brain inexorably decline. However, recent discoveries in neuroscience show that the ageing brain is more flexible and adaptable than we previously thought. Throughout life, our brains encode thoughts and memories by forming new connections among the nerve bodies (neurons).With age, the neurons themselves lose some processing speed, but with the acquired learning of a lifetime, they become ever more richly intertwined, reflecting deeper knowledge and better judgment. The brain also becomes less rigidly bifurcated. Functionally two separate structures, the right brain and the left brain, are linked by fibres called the corpus callosum; the left specialises in speech, language and logical reasoning, while the right handles more intuitive tasks, such as face recognition and the reading of emotional cues. Unlike young adults, who handle most tasks on one side of the brain or the other, older ones tend to use both hemispheres. Besides keeping them sharp, this neural integration makes it easier for healthy mid-lifers to reconcile their thoughts with their feelings. As our ageing brains grow wiser and more flexible, they also tend toward greater equanimity. But one can’t sit back and expect wisdom and contentment to flow automatically. Research has identified several types of activities, which if practised regularly, help boost the powers of the ageing brain.Achieve mastery. Mastery over a skill or job is the most important factor deciding a person’s self-efficacy, especially in today’s world. Success experiences raise one’s sense of self-efficacy, failure lowers it. Practise mastering a skill, doing something or striving to do something at its highest level. People who enjoy a sense of control and mastery stay healthier than those who don’t. The possibilities are unlimited, ranging from learning a new language, playing a musical instrument, to taking up painting or embroidery.Exercise physically. Regular physical exercise leads to increased blood flow to the brain, the production of endorphins, better filtration of waste products from the brain and increased brain-oxygen levels and is consistently linked to increased well-being.Establish strong social networks. People who sustain rich and extended social relationships during the second half of life have been shown to enjoy significantly lower blood pressure, lower risk of stroke and brain damage. Social relationships also reduce stress, anxiety and depression.Fulfil your need for generativity. During middle age, the primary developmental task is one of contributing to society and helping to guide future generations. This leads to a sense of generativity-a sense of productivity and accomplishment. In contrast, a person who is self-centred and unable or unwilling to help society move forward develops a feeling of stagnation.advertisementlast_img read more

15 days agoGenk president Croonen reveals Napoli made Sander Berge attempt

first_imgGenk president Croonen reveals Napoli made Sander Berge attemptby Carlos Volcano15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveGenk president Peter Croonen has revealed Napoli made an attempt for Sander Berge.The 21-year-old played in the 0-0 Champions League draw with Napoli a fortnight ago and is under contract until June 2021.“Napoli have very good directors who really appreciate our players and asked for information on our Norwegian midfielder Sander Berge,” Croonen told Radio Kiss Kiss.“I think the figures that have been mentioned in the media, around €20-25m, represents a fair valuation.” Berge was signed from Valerenga in January 2017 for just €2m. TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

ATB Financial CEO retiring after leading Crown corp for 11 years

first_imgCALGARY – ATB Financial president and CEO Dave Mowat is retiring at the end of June after 11 years as head of the Alberta Crown corporation.The bank says it is starting a search for a replacement and will announce Mowat’s successor in May.Mowat, 62, led the bank through the 2008-09 financial crisis as well as the oil price downturn that took hold in 2015 and leaves as the economy shows signs of recovery.Over Mowat’s tenure, the bank’s assets climbed from $20.3 billion in 2007 to $49.6 billion as of last September, while total operating revenue went from $751 million to a last reporting of $1.5 billion.He also headed the review of the province’s royalty regime initiated by the Alberta NDP government that left the existing system largely in place.Mowat says that after a decade of leading the bank, it’s time for a new leader to infuse the company with new ideas and approaches.last_img read more

Fort St John RCMP hosting Jail n Bail on Wednesday

first_imgMembers of the public will be able to nominate their friends, family members and coworkers to be “arrested” by an RCMP member. The “Person of Interest” can either give their “bail” money to the member or be escorted to the “jail” located in the Canadian Tire parking lot. Once in Jail, the detainee will have to raise their bail money before they can be released. All bail money will be donated to the Cops for Cancer donation drive.Constable Chad Neustaeter said that since May, the three officers have ridden over 2,300 kilometres to train for this year’s tour. Last year’s Jail ‘n’ Bail in Fort St. John raised $21,355.“This is the 17th year for Cops for Cancer Tour de North,” said Cpl. Owen. “In 2017, with support from our communities we raised $353,000. This year our goal is to raise $400K!! We are having an impact against pediatric cancer! 80% of our funds raised go to pediatric cancer research and 20% to Camp Goodtimes. Over 3.2 million dollars has been raised, and over 530,000 kms ridden by Tour de North Riders in the past 16 years.”The Jail ‘n’ Bail is taking place tomorrow at the Canadian Tire parking lot on 93rd Ave. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John RCMP will be hosting its annual Jail ‘n’ Bail in the Energetic City on Wednesday.Three members of the Fort St. John RCMP – Rebecca Bojczuk, Joelle Jensen, and Spencer Owen – will be riding over 700 kilometres from Prince George to Prince Rupert in this year’s Cops for Cancer – Tour de North later this month.To help the three officers raise money, the RCMP hosting the Jail & Bail from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., along with a burger barbecue from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.last_img read more