Tag: 苏州桑拿论坛

Par panel concerned over funds availability for sports varsity

first_imgNew Delhi, Jan 10 (PTI) A parliamentary panel today expressed concern over availability of funds for proposed National Sports University and suggested that the corporate sector should be approached for their contribution under CSR.The Parliamentary Standing Committee on Human Resource Development, headed by Satyanarayan Jatiya, in its report on the national sports university bill, has also suggested that it should use information technology to provide online courses to students in other parts of the country.”The Committee was concerned about the availability of funds for the University and felt that at any point of time it should not suffer due to resource constraints,” Rajya Sabha secretariat said in a statement.It was further suggested that in addition to the provision made in the bill, corporate sector should be approached for contribution under their corporate social responsibility requesting for setting up of chairs, fellowships and scholarships in the varsity.The National Sports University Bill 2017 was introduced in August last year in the Lok Sabha.The university is proposed to be set up in Manipur.The panel feels that the proposed National Sports University would prove to be an umbrella institute at the national level.It will synchronise all the sports related activities right from spreading the sports culture throughout the country to producing the medal winning sportspersons at global level. PTI JTR DIPlast_img read more

Video: A Charged Up Carmelo Anthony Screams DJ Khaled Quotes At His TV After Syracuse’s Dramatic Win

first_imgcarmelo anthony warms up during a game against the lakersLOS ANGELES, CA – OCTOBER 20: Carmelo Anthony #7 of the Houston Rockets warms up before the game against the Los Angeles Lakers at Staples Center on October 20, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Many didn’t believe Syracuse should even be included in this year’s NCAA Tournament. All the Orange have done since receiving that fateful bid is run through the bottom of the Midwest Region, knocking off a very game Gonzaga squad in last night’s Sweet 16 to set up a date with ACC rival Virginia for a chance at the Final Four.If SU somehow crashes the party as a 10-seed, expect to see plenty of the program’s alumni supporting the program. The most famous—2003 national champion Carmelo Anthony—was incredibly fired up after watching Tyler Lydon end Gonzaga’s night with his huge block. His wife, Lala, recorded him screaming DJ Khaled quotes at the TV.  Anthony wasn’t the only former Orange forward with a big reaction to the finish. Terrance Roberts, who played at SU from 2003-2007, had a more NSFW take on Lydon’s big play. LETS G !!!!!!!!! @Tyler_Lydon14 pic.twitter.com/QDqecgRG3S— Terrence Roberts (@TjR_16) March 26, 2016Combining Syracuse’s low seed, last year’s self-imposed tournament ban and Jim Boeheim’s suspension this season, and the continued assertion by some that this SU team is not deserving, expect Syracuse fans to bunker down even more, especially if the team knocks off Virginia on Sunday.More: Vote In Our “Most Annoying People In Sports Media” Bracket >>>last_img read more

Freeland shares a dark history lesson with NAFTA partners at trade talks

first_imgWASHINGTON – A book which Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland shared with her U.S. and Mexican colleagues during the last round of NAFTA negotiations, offers a dark message about globalization’s collapse, the rise of nationalism and humanity tumbling into an abyss of death and destruction.She brought three books to an informal book club with peers Robert Lighthizer and Ildefonso Guajardo. Two tell a positive tale of human advancement. The third serves up a bleak historical lesson about the big anti-globalization backlash of the last century.It’s no accident she chose to share “The War That Ended Peace,” Canadian historian Margaret MacMillan’s look at the factors that led to the first of two world wars. Freeland, the book and, in an interview, the book’s author, all cite similarities to today.Freeland and other Canadian officials have been struck by the book’s haunting tale: how a period of fast-paced globalization, prosperity, disruptive technology and increased trade was brutally upended by nationalism, zero-sum logic, a global terrorism panic and glorified militarism, ushering in the most blood-soaked era in history.“(It) documents the speed and ferocity with which reaction can set in, even at times when the world feels safely rooted in a progressive and peaceful era,” Freeland said in response to a question about the book.“As with today, the beginning of the 20th century was marked by unprecedented globalization and growth. The events between the turn of the century and the outbreak of war in 1914 are a useful reminder (of) the fragility of the world order and the pitfalls of protectionism and retreat.”The book starts with the 1900 Paris world’s fair and the Belle Epoque.That world was unprecedentedly interconnected by railways and the telegraph. Trade skyrocketed. Germany and England even traded weapons. People lived longer, healthier lives. New international mechanisms were created to settle disputes. Countries signed arbitration agreements, refined international rules of war and even talked about creating global governance bodies.The book describes a growing belief that war itself was becoming obsolete, quoting one author: “People no (more) believed in the possibility of barbaric relapses … (than) in ghosts and witches’.”But these were also disruptive times.Economies underwent radical transformations and workers left farms for new manufacturing jobs in the cities.Terrorism was rampant. Anarchists had killed, bombed, stabbed and shot a French president, two Spanish prime ministers, an Italian king, a U.S. president, an Austrian empress, a Russian statesman and a Russian royal.MacMillan writes of the militaristic backlash. People fumed about the new softness of European men, responding with military-themed organizations for boys. Politicians increasingly wore uniforms in public.Soft-centrist politicians were booted from power.Classical liberal parties devoted to open markets were demolished, left and right. On the left, by socialists, and on the right by, “chauvinistic nationalist parties… A new breed of politicians was going outside established parliamentary institutions to appeal to popular fears and prejudices and their populism … frequently included anti-Semitism.”MacMillan is thrilled policy-makers might draw lessons from that time. She also credits them for trying to squeeze her 649-page book, and two other books, into busy schedules.“I’m impressed,” MacMillan said in an interview from England.“How they find time to read anything, much less a huge, fat book like mine, I can’t imagine. I wonder if they looked at (Freeland) and thought, ‘What is she doing giving us this enormous book?’…”(But) I always find it reassuring when statesmen do have a sense of history. … It helps them — to give them perspective.”MacMillan cautions that there are no perfect parallels in history, that circumstances change.But she said there are obvious echoes in this anti-globalization, America First, Brexit era — with nationalist politicians complaining about foreigners, international agreements, duty-free imports and global institutions forged after the Second World War.“There are, I think, warning signs,” she said.“There are parallels that should make us at least stop and think.”If policy-makers take away one message from her book, she says, it’s this: The pursuit of narrow self-interest can inspire others to respond in kind and everyone winds up worse off.The other books Freeland shared are more optimistic.She gave colleagues, “Sapiens,” a sweeping history of the human species by Noah Harari, a favoured author of Guajardo’s. The final tome was from prize-winning economist Angus Deaton.In his, “The Great Escape,” the Scottish-American author unleashes an avalanche of data illustrating the good fortune of living today in an era of unprecedented wealth, health and human lifespans.He even argues that growing inequality — within and between countries — is a natural effect of rapid technological change, as people catch up at different paces. He suggests ways to address that inequality, including trade and education, rather than traditional international assistance, which he criticizes.Even MacMillan’s book ends on a slightly optimistic note.After chronicling the tragic decisions that pushed Europe into a canyon of catastrophe, she concludes with four hopeful words: “There are always choices.”last_img read more