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Tottenham v Borussia Dortmund: Changes for Spurs as Aurier makes debut

first_img Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebook Embed from Getty ImagesSerge Aurier makes his Tottenham debut in tonight’s Champions League clash at Wembley.Aurier, recently signed from Paris St-Germain, starts for Spurs and Kieran Trippier is among the substitutes.Another new signing, Juan Foyth, is also on the bench.Meanwhile, Son Heung-min comes in for the suspended Dele Alli, while Mousa Dembele is restored, with Moussa Sissoko dropping to the bench.Tottenham: Lloris, Aurier, Alderweireld, Sanchez, Vertonghen, Davies, Dier, Dembele, Eriksen, Son, Kane.Subs: Vorm, Foyth, Trippier, Walker-Peters, Winks, Sissoko, Llorente.Dortmund: Bürki, Piszczek, Sokratis, Toprak, Toljan, Sahin, Dahoud, Kagawa, Aubameyang, Yarmolenko, Pulisic.Subs: Weidenfeller, Subotic, Castro, Götze, Zagadou, Isak, Philipplast_img read more

Final whistle for winning Team SA?

first_imgCape Town was the host city for theHomeless World Cup in 2006. Gerald Bez shoots for goal during theHomeless World Cup match between SAand Australia, held at the Grand Paradein Cape Town, South Africa, in 2006.(Images: Flickr)MEDIA CONTACTS• Clifford MartinusSAHSS: Director+27 21 704 6815 / +27 82 945 4812Ray MaotaThe South African Homeless Street Soccer (SAHSS) initiative teaches young people life skills for handling issues such as HIV/Aids, crime and substance abuse.This they do by using soccer as a tool to keep them off the streets and opening them up to opportunities outside their normal environment.The initiative is part of Oasis: “Reach for your dreams”, which was started in 2000 by director Clifford Martinus and his friends as an informal soccer team for youngsters living in the streets of Cape Town, but grew bigger and was formally registered as a non-profit organisation (NPO) in 2002. Oasis Soccer Club still exists today and takes part in local tournaments.Established in 2006, the SAHSS became part of a worldwide network known as the Homeless World Cup Foundation, which includes 94 international partner organisations whose goal is to improve the lives of homeless people through soccer.The foundation is the brainchild of Mel Young, the co-founder of The Big Issue, a weekly magazine sold by homeless people in Scotland. He is also responsible for setting up the International Network of Street Papers (INSP), a global network of street papers sold worldwide.It was in Cape Town, at the end of the annual INSP conference in 2001, that Young and Austrian Harald Schmied, who is also involved in issues relating to homeless people, came up with the concept of the Homeless World Cup Foundation.“When we started out it was just to get the youth busy with soccer,” said Martinus.“Never did we realise that this was the beginning of a way of reaching more people and become a sense of opportunity for others less fortunate than ourselves.”He added that they are looking to expand their soccer programmes to more provinces and in future host a national street soccer tournament.Team SA is ranked 20th out of 56 nations involved in the international tournament. This year’s event takes place in Mexico in October and will host a record 72 countries, with 56 taking part in the men’s event and 16 in the women’s.The tournament started in Graz, Austria in 2003, and has been to four continents.National teams send different members every year, so as to give as many of their incumbents exposure to travelling and learning about new cultures as possible.“People tend to think this is just a joyous trip, but for these youngsters, meeting people with similar situations – whether it is drug abuse of being considered anti-social – is an eye-opener,” said Martinus.“They are boarding a plane for the first time to another country, and when they get there they realise that some of the people they meet are going through the same situation and there is a way out of it.”Not only for the homelessMartinus said although it’s named homeless street soccer, it does not include only the homeless and destitute.“Most of the participants live in places of safety and are from the streets, while others live in informal settlements,” he said.The team taking part in this year’s event will consist of eight players, four technical staff members and two social workers. It is in need of funds to help cover travelling costs.Mobile phone company Cell C, which was team sponsor for the 2010 and 2011 competitions, has had to restructure its sponsorship responsibilities this year.“Unfortunately our funding this year has gone to women and children initiatives and we could not carry on with the sponsorship,” confirmed Mag Pillay, Cell C public relations manager.The issue is uppermost on Martinus’s mind.“We need to get funds for flight tickets, the kit and a stipend for the players so they can feel comfortable among their counterparts at the tournament.”The cost of the trip is likely to exceed R200 000 (US$24 000) due to the airfares.Success stories of the initiativeAyanda Nqkayi (35) is a former captain of the team. Before joining the initiative he used to sell dagga as a means of survival, but through the SAHSS programme has become involved with the Cape Town Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA).Nqkayi participates in YMCA projects such as the After School Programme, where youngsters are motivated to develop their education, confidence, leadership, and social skills in a safe environment.Martinus said they also recently had the Western Cape Street Soccer finals and called on previous players to facilitate with the proceedings so they can earn some money.Thulisile Bolana (24) from Khayelitsha is also a member of the SAHSS team. He will be going to Germany in June to a leadership camp organised by the UN Sport for Development and Peace. He is one of only three from Africa who were invited to represent the projects to which they belong and share ideas with others from around the world.He will be representing Oasis and speaking on how youth from around the world use soccer and sports in general to develop themselves.Lukhanyo Mdokwa, who was captain of the team in 2010, was taken in as assistant coach for South Africa at last year’s event. While there he was asked by the director of Paris-based Saint-Germain soccer club, who is Brazilian, to assist with the Brazil homeless team.“Lukhanyo will this year go again as assistant coach if we do get the funds to go to Mexico, but he will not come back to South Africa as he will join the Brazilian team and work at an NGO in Brazil,” said Martinus.last_img read more

2018 JCI SADC Regional Leadership Academy

first_imgJohannesburg, 28 February 2018 – Brand South Africa has once again collaborated with the JCI African Academy to host the SADC Regional Leadership Conference which is targeted at young leaders who are creating positive changes in their communities.Annually, the conference unites at least 1000 young active citizen from more than 50 partner countries to participate in inspirational sessions, impactful workshops, official General Assembly meetings and fun-filled events to share best practices, exchange ideas and determine the future of the dynamic organisation. “Youth are an integral part in creating pathways for accelerated socio-economic development for our nation and our continent. As a big part of the population, young people are at the heart of our future, and it is for this reason, that we at Brand South Africa have partnered with the JCI African Academy to harness effective youth development practices. This platform affords us the opportunity to engage with the youth on how they can partake in social cohesion and active citizenship activities because we are confident that Africa’s destiny lies in the hands of our youth,” said Brand South Africa’s CEO Dr Kingsley Makhubela.  Brand South Africa invites media to join us for 2018 JCI SADC Regional Leadership Academy Date             :                  Thursday 01 – Saturday 03 March 2018 Time            :                  09h00 – 16h00 Venue          :                  Dynasty Hotel (19 Westbrooke Dr, Sandown, Johannesburg) RSVPs           :                  Tsabeng Nthite on tsabengn@brandsouthafrica.com                                      Mobile: 076 371 6810 Issued by Brand South AfricaHoughtonJohannesburglast_img read more

In Rajasthan, dairy farmers live in fear

first_imgYet another instance of cow vigilantism, involving the alleged lynching of a Muslim dairy farmer, Rakbar Khan, 31, in Alwar district of Rajasthan on the night of July 20 led to nationwide outrage and prompted both the Central and State governments to take urgent measures to control the situation.What happened?Rakbar and his friend Aslam were herding two cows on foot through a forest area in Ramgarh’s Lalawandi village, when a group of villagers stopped and attacked them around midnight on the suspicion that they were smuggling the cows to their native village in Haryana. While Mr. Aslam managed to escape, Rakbar sustained severe injuries and died on the way to hospital.The incident comes just over a year after another dairy farmer, Pehlu Khan, was lynched by a mob near Behror in Alwar district on April 1, 2017. Pehlu Khan and four others were transporting cows in vehicles to Nuh district in Haryana when they were stopped and assaulted. In another incident, a mob killed Umar Khan near Govindgarh in November 2017.What did the govt. do?After the quick arrest of three accused, Home Minister Gulab Chand Kataria visited the spot of the alleged lynching, met Rakbar’s family and promised a fair probe and an initial ex gratia of ₹1.25 lakh. Haryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar and the Waqf Board also announced assistance of ₹5 lakh and ₹3 lakh respectively to the victim’s family.Mr. Kataria admitted that Rakbar had died in police custody and there was a delay in taking him to hospital, as the policemen first made arrangements for taking the cows recovered from him to a ‘gaushala.’ For this “error of judgment,” an assistant sub-inspector was suspended and three policemen were sent to the Police Lines.Four inquiries were instituted in the case in four days, and the investigation was shifted from Alwar to Jaipur. The government’s swift response seems to have been guided by political compulsion and pressure from the Opposition, as the Assembly election is due later this year in Rajasthan.How is Rakbar’s village coping?There is a palpable fear and unease in Rakbar’s native village, Kolgaon, situated in the Ferozepur Jhirka region of Haryana. Rakbar’s family, comprising his wife and seven children, faces a bleak future with no permanent source of livelihood. The Meo community inhabiting the region, which has been rearing cows for dairy occupation for several generations, feels that it is being targeted. A huge panchayat held at Kolgaon on July 29 by the Rakbar Insaaf Committee, comprising about 40 prominent people from five villages, sought a Supreme Court judge-monitored investigation into the alleged lynching, ex-gratia of ₹50 lakh for the family of the victim and the arrest of BJP MLA from Ramgarh Gyan Dev Ahuja on charges of criminal conspiracy in the case. Activists and family members also believe that a “deliberate attempt” is being made to shift the blame on to the police and let the lynch mob escape.The accused arrested so far are reportedly affiliated to the Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP).What lies ahead?With civil rights groups demanding that both the Rajasthan and Haryana governments chalk out a plan for protection of dairy farmers in the Mewat region, the ruling BJP in these States has a task cut out to deal with both alleged cow smugglers and mobs. The extortion rackets being run in the garb of cow vigilantism are now under the police radar. Besides making attempts at communal harmony, the police are finalising the chargesheet to be filed in Rakbar’s case. The police in Alwar district are also in the process of identifying miscreants after examining their criminal record. Jaipur range Inspector-General of Police V.K. Singh says this will be followed by preventive measures, including arrests, to stop the recurrence of violence.last_img read more