Tag: 杭州十大红灯

Camel finds home in Assam after long legal battle

first_imgA camel rescued from smugglers on the Bangladesh border has found a home in eastern Assam’s Sivasagar after a six-month legal battle for ownership between the State police and the authorities of the Assam State Zoo. The camel, an adult male, left the zoo in Guwahati in a truck on Monday morning for an “animal home” in eastern Assam’s Sivasagar district about 350 km away. His companion was Samiran Hatimuria, who runs the home called Aranyam.“The camel is a welcome addition to my family, whose members include emus, turkeys, guinea pigs, horses, 12 types of peafowls, five varieties of pigeons, and other animals. I hope the camel adapts to our 12-bigha home,” Mr. Hatimuria, 32, told The Hindu after reaching his village Talugaon, about 3 km from Sivasagar town.The police in western Assam’s Goalpara district had in mid-2018 rescued the camel while the animal was allegedly being transported for smuggling into Bangladesh.Like two more camels rescued from the same district in January that year, this camel, too, was shifted to the zoo.The first two camels were diagnosed as carriers of diseases that veterinarians said could put the caged animals in the zoo at risk. Zoo officials approached the Sessions Court in Goalpara after the two died six months ago.“We told the court that the zoo is not authorised to keep domestic animals and that the police should take back the third camel, which appeared healthy,” Tejas Marisamy, the zoo’s Divisional Forest Officer (DFO), said.In course of time, the local court asked the police to take the camel back. But the inability of the police to accommodate the animal left it in the zoo.In December, the zoo got in touch with Mr. Hatimuria, who had, since opening Aranyam in 2008, earned a reputation for letting his facility out to be used by the Sivasagar district wildlife officials to shelter rescued wild animals temporarily for treatment or rehabilitation in the wild.“The zoo paid for the camel’s transportation. Sustenance for the animal would be appreciated, but I can take care of him, like the others at Aranyam. My parents earn a decent living, I run a small business and we have some farm income, too,” he said.“The police should ideally provide for the camel’s fodder and care since they are legally its custodian. But we will try to work a way out,” Mr. Marisamy said.last_img read more

Bulker Ordering Frenzy 110 Bulkers Ordered Since July

first_imgzoom Since the beginning of the second half of this year, shipowners have ramped up dry bulk ordering, bringing the newbuild count to 110 new ships in the last three months.The number has almost doubled when compared to 63 newbuilding orders from the first half of this year, according to the data from VesselsValue.Interestingly enough, the majority of shipowners contracting newbuilds comes from Japan and they have ordered 41 new dry bulk carriers since July 1, 2017.The Japanese owners are followed by their Greek counterparts with 25 orders, 13 from Singapore, 8 from Turkey and 7 from China. The remaining 16 orders are split between other countries, including those from Saudi Arabia’s Bahri and Bulgaria’s Navibulgar.To remind, earlier this month Japanese company Nissen Kaiun placed an order for ten 82,000 DWT bulk carriers at compatriot shipyards.Furthermore, Japan’s Kambara Kissen has ordered eight Panamaxes and two Ultramaxes at Tsuneishi Cebu Shipbuilding, slated for delivery by 2020.Big orders also came from Nisshin Shipping and Singapore’s Yangzijiang Shipping Pte that ordered seven bulkers each during the said period.A new mega-order seems to be in the making, as indicated by brokers, involving Brazilian miner Vale which has been linked to a time charter deal for up to 30 Valemax newbuilds.Under the long-term contracts of affreightment lasting up to 25 years, Chinese joint venture between ICBC Leasing and China Merchants would be providing ten 400,000 DWT bulkers, while South Korean shipping company Pan Ocean would be providing 4 Valemax newbuilds.In addition, Pan Ocean’s compatriots Korea Line Corporation, H Line Shipping, and SK Shipping would each contribute two 400,000 DWT bulkers, data from Intermodal Research shows.Furthermore, Polaris Shipping is reportedly ordering up to ten newbuilds to support the contract.The orders are said to be spread across several Chinese and South Korean yards, with Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) being tied to an order from Polaris, with likely deliveries in 2019-2020.When asked about the order by World Maritime News, Vale said it could not comment on the reports.Polaris and HHI are yet to confirm the market reports as well.Prompted by attractive newbuilding prices the owners are rushing to the yards to secure newbuilding tonnage anent the anticipated market recovery.Nevertheless, the ordering spree might result in the boomerang effect and delay the much-needed recovery even further amid the threat of tonnage oversupply that is likely to keep freight rates down.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

WilsonRaybould says she put justice ahead of politics in SNCLavalin affair

first_imgJustin BrakeAPTN NewsJody Wilson-Raybould says her experiences as an Indigenous person and the values she was raised with are what drove her to challenge the highest echelons of power in Canada over the SNC-Lavalin case.“The history of Crown-Indigenous relations in this country includes a history of the rule of law not being respected,” she said.The former justice minister and attorney general testified Wednesday that she came under relentless pressure — including veiled threats — from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his senior staff, the top public servant and Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s office to halt a criminal prosecution of Montreal engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.And she says she believes she was shuffled out of the prestigious justice portfolio to veterans affairs in January because she refused to give in to it.Wilson-Raybould made the stunning and detailed accusations in testimony Wednesday before the House of Commons justice committee, breaking three weeks of silence on the affair that has rocked the government, prompting her resignation from cabinet and the departure of Gerald Butts, Trudeau’s most trusted adviser.Read: Opening Statement of Jody Wilson-Raybould Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, speaking immediately after Wilson-Raybould’s testimony finished, said Trudeau had lost the moral authority to govern the country and should resign.He also called for a police investigation of Wilson-Raybould’s claims.NDP leader Jagmeet Singh said Trudeau “may need to resign,” but focused his message on reiterating his party’s call for a public inquiry, which he says would shine more light on the controversy.Speaking at an event in St. Hubert, Que. Wednesday evening, Trudeau denied any wrongdoing.“I strongly maintain, as I have from the beginning, that I and my staff have always acted appropriately and professionally. I therefore completely disagree with the former attorney general’s characterization of events.”Pressed by reporters on details contained in Wilson-Raybould’s testimony, Trudeau said he had not yet had a chance to listen to it in its entirety.(Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer is calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to resign. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)Wilson-Raybould told the committee she was “hounded” to end the prosecution for months after the director of public prosecutions, Kathleen Roussel, had rejected the idea of negotiating a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin and long after she had unequivocally declared that she would not direct Roussel to reverse her decision.“For a period of approximately four months, between September and December of 2018, I experienced a consistent and sustained effort by many people within the government to seek to politically interfere in the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in my role as the attorney general of Canada,” she told the committee.Nevertheless, Wilson-Raybould said she didn’t consider resigning at the time and didn’t directly raise her concerns with Trudeau after Sept. 17, when she first informed him that she believed it would be inappropriate for her to intervene in the SNC-Lavalin matter.She said she didn’t speak directly to Trudeau about SNC-Lavalin again until Jan. 7, when he informed her he was about to move her out of the justice portfolio and she suggested the move was the result of her refusal to intervene in the prosecution, which he denied.She accepted a move to veterans affairs on Jan. 14 and did not resign from cabinet until Feb. 11, five days after an anonymously sourced allegation that she’d been improperly pressured first surfaced in the Globe and Mail.“At the time, I did not see it as my responsibility to resign. I saw myself as the attorney general of the country who was doing her job to ensure and uphold the independence of the prosecutor and uphold the integrity of the justice system and the rule of law.’’After she was moved out of that role, Wilson-Raybould said she would have resigned immediately had her successor in the justice portfolio, David Lametti, issued a directive to Roussel to negotiate a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin — which the attorney general is lawfully entitled to do, as long as that the directive is published in the official record of government decisions, the Canada Gazette.Trudeau has said there were vigorous discussions within government about the SNC-Lavalin case but that he repeatedly assured Wilson-Raybould that a decision on intervening to halt the prosecution was hers alone.She disputed that version of events, saying Trudeau only offered some vague assurance after she confronted him directly at the Sept. 17 meeting, two weeks after Roussel had decided not to consider a remediation agreement.“The prime minister asked me to help out, to find a solution here for SNC, citing that if there was no [remediation agreement] there would be many jobs lost and that SNC would move from Montreal,” Wilson-Raybould said.(NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is calling for a public inquiry into the SNC-Lavalin affair. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)She said she explained the law to Trudeau and told him she “had made up my mind” to not intervene with Roussel.But she said Trudeau and Privy Council clerk Michael Wernick continued to express concerns, with Wernick noting that Quebec was holding an election in a couple of weeks and Trudeau stressing that he is himself a Quebec MP.“I was quite taken aback,” she said, adding that she looked Trudeau in the eye and asked, “Are you politically interfering with my role, my decision as the attorney general? … The prime minister said, ‘No, no, no, we just need to find a solution.’”Wilson-Raybould detailed instances of what she considered inappropriate pressure by Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s chief of staff and others but said the pressure campaign escalated over the fall, even after SNC-Lavalin went to court to challenge Roussel’s rejection of a remediation agreement.Her chief of staff, Jessica Prince, was eventually summoned to an urgent Dec. 18 meeting with Trudeau’s chief of staff, Katie Telford, and his principal secretary, Gerald Butts.Citing text messages from Prince sent to her immediately after the meeting, Wilson-Raybould said the prime minister’s top two aides wanted her to hire an external legal expert, possibly a retired Supreme Court justice, to give an opinion on the appropriateness of directing Roussel to reverse her decision on the SNC-Lavalin prosecution.When Prince suggested that would be interference, Butts purportedly said, “Jess, there is no solution here that does not involve some interference.”Telford said an external legal opinion would give the government “cover” and allow Trudeau to say he was doing something. She also offered to line up op-eds in the media supporting a decision to intervene in the prosecution, according to the texts.But the most egregious pressure came the following day, on Dec. 19, when Wilson-Raybould said she received what she deemed to be three “veiled threats” that she could lose her job from the clerk of the Privy Council, Wernick.The country’s top civil servant last week told the committee he believes there was no improper pressure applied to Wilson-Raybould by him or anyone else.According to Wilson-Raybould, Wernick told her that Trudeau wanted to know why SNC-Lavalin was not being offered a remediation agreement, a kind of plea bargain that would allow the company to avoid the potentially crippling impact of a criminal conviction.He told her that the prime minister was “going to find a way to get it done one way or the other” and that it was not good for the attorney general to be “at loggerheads” with the prime minister.(Jody Wilson-Raybould leaves the committee after testifying for nearly four hours. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)In all, Wilson-Raybould said pressure was exerted on her or her staff by 11 people through approximately 10 phone calls, 10 meetings and numerous emails and text messages.They repeatedly raised concerns about the risks to SNC-Lavalin’s viability if it were convicted of corruption and fraud in relation to work it sought in Libya.Moreover, she said they were worried that the company might decide to move its operations out of Quebec, affecting last fall’s provincial election in Quebec and potentially hurting more Liberals in the province, including Trudeau, in the coming federal election this fall.She said she was told repeatedly the decision was up to her, but attempts to talk her into a remediation agreement were relentless.Concluding her half hour opening statement, Wilson-Raybould said her understanding of the rule of law has been shaped by her experiences as an Indigenous person.“Indeed, one of the main reasons for the urgent need for justice and reconciliation today is that in the history of our country we have not always upheld foundational values, such as the rule of law, in relations to Indigenous peoples. And I have seen the negative impacts for freedom, equality and a just society this can have first hand.“I was taught to always be careful of what you say, because you cannot take it back,” she continued. “And I was taught to always hold true to your core values and principles and to act with integrity. These are the teachings of my parents, grandparents and community.“I come from a long line of matriarchs and I am a truth teller in accordance with the laws and traditions of our Big House.“This is who I am and who I will always be.”jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenews-with files from the Canadian Presslast_img read more