Tag: 南京桑拿

3-Day Conflict Resolution Seminar in Monrovia

first_imgA three-day conflict resolution seminar will begin on Wednesday, May 21 to 23, at a local hotel in Monrovia, with 20 participants.According to Netsai Mushonga, senior manager of Cape Town, South Africa-based Centre for Conflict Resolution (CCR), the participants are drawn from human rights organizations, ECOWAS and the Ministry of Defense.She said two representatives each from the Liberia Broadcasting System (LBS) and the Daily Observer newspaper, have been invited to attend the seminar.“The media’s role in conflict resolution is important and therefore we recognize their contribution,” she said.She stated subjects to be considered at the seminar will provide knowledgeable skills on conflict resolution management.Mushonga said the CCR is a pan African organization with the primary interest to build the capacity of those in conflict resolutions, particularly in a country like Liberia where due to its recent past; conflict resolution skills have become necessary.Providing additional information on the seminar, Ms. Antonia Porter, a staff of the Centre for Conflict Resolution, said the seminar would provide better understanding on how to manage conflicts in a given situation.Porter, project officer of the Centre for Conflict Resolution has written extensively on gender issues, including special consideration on how HIV/AIDS is experienced in Africa, including in societies suffering or recovering from conflict and it was published in the Cape Times newspaper of South Africa.The Centre for Conflict Resolution is located in Cape Town, South Africa with the primary objective to contribute towards a just and sustainable peace in Africa by promoting constructive, creative and co-operative approaches to the resolution of conflict through training, policy development, research and capacity building.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Gallery: Eastern Cape, a place of natural wonders

first_imgCross the border into the Eastern Cape, whether along the N6 or N2, and an overwhelming calm takes over. Its green hills, dense forests and warm seas embrace the visitor, revealing all that is sacred and making you feel as if you have arrived home.The Eastern Cape’s landscape is varied and suits the taste of any tourist. You can ski the alpine slopes of Tiffindell, hike the forests of Tsitsikamma, lounge on any of its golden beaches and take in the savannah culture of the Karoo. (Images: Shamin Chibba, unless stated otherwise)Compiled by Shamin ChibbaIt’s September. It’s spring in South Africa – and Tourism Month, celebrated this year with the theme “Tourism for All”. To inspire your next road trip we bring you nine galleries, one for each province, showcasing our country’s remarkable beauty and diversity.A thriving tourism industry means South Africa is closer to achieving its National Development Plan goals of skills development and creating decent employment through inclusive economic growth.The Eastern Cape’s natural landscape is varied and caters for tourists of all kinds. One can ski the alpine slopes of Tiffindell, surf the Supertubes in Jeffrey’s Bay , hike the forest in Hogsback and explore the oddities in the savannah-like Karoo towns.The Eastern Cape is a storied part of South Africa, filled with people carving out a life in what is the country’s poorest province. Despite this, its people have a lot of heart and if you spend a little time with them, you will feel as if you have always belonged there.The East London beachfront hosts one of the country’s biggest New Years’ bashes each year. But between the parties, it is calm, with many East Londoners walking or running on the promenade at the end of the day.Kologha Forest in Stutterheim is the second largest natural forest in South Africa after the Knysna Forest. It can be explored by foot, mountain bike and even on horseback. For those looking to do a spot of fishing, the forest’s waterways are home to trout. Be on the lookout for the forest’s many inhabitants, which include bushpigs, bats, monkeys, duikers and numerous birds. (Image: SA-Venues.com)Built between 1860 and 1880, the Donkin Street terraced houses in Port Elizabeth are actually integrated as a single unit. The whole street was declared a national monument in 1967.Tiffindell Ski Resort, in the Southern Drakensberg, is South Africa’s only ski and snowboarding resort. Established in 1993, the resort has since become the country’s winter playground. It uses snow making and grooming machines to maintain the ski hill. (Image: Tiffindell Ski Resort)The Eco Shrine in the mystical village of Hogsback is a nod to the power of art, nature, science and the sacred. In the distance are the three ridges from which the Hogsback takes its name. Some speculate that Hogsback’s magical surrounds inspired JRR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy. Residents have run with the claim, with names like Camelot, Hobbiton, Rivendell, The Shire, Lothlorien and Middle Earth seen everywhere. When you visit, don’t forget to hike to the Madonna and Child waterfall. (Image: Flickr, South African Tourism)The Big Tree in Tsitsikamma is estimated to be between 600 and 800 years old, stands 36.6 metres tall and has a trunk circumference of nine metres.Found in the town of Storms River, the Big Tree is a yellowwood. This species, South Africa’s national tree, is endangered. Before yellowwoods were cut and logged almost to extinction, they dominated country’s landscape, particularly in the Eastern Cape and Western Cape. Today, there is just 10% of the yellowwood trees of 350 years ago.Hole in the Wall is a village south of Coffee Bay on the Wild Coast. In isiXhosa, the area is called esiKhaleni, which means ‘the place of sound’. Some say the name comes from the cracking sound made by waves slapping the rocks while others believe it comes from a legend about a young maiden who fell in love with one of the mythical ‘sea people’. (Image: Flickr, South African Tourism)Jeffrey’s Bay is South Africa’s number one surf spot, known as Supertubes. It attracts some of the best surfers in the world for the Billabong Surf Pro Championship, in July each year. (Image: Flickr, South African Tourism)The beachfront in East London is a great place for tourists to pick up arts and crafts.The N2 road runs along the Eastern Cape coast, linking Cape Town and Durban and beyond. It forms part of the Garden Route. The road cuts through some of the country’s diverse flora and fauna as well as picturesque Eastern Cape towns such as Port Alfred and Kenton-on-Sea.A man and his dog, a common sight at Nahoon Beach, East London.In Nieu Bethesda, The Owl House is a testament to the power of imagination. With its numerous sculptures of owls, bottle-skirted hostesses, mermaids, camels and pilgrims, The Owl House has become almost a required stop for visitors to the Karoo village. Depending on your outlook, the place is either weird or wonderful. (Image: Flickr, South African Tourism)Donkin Reserve in Port Elizabeth’s city centre was declared a public space in perpetuity by Sir Rufane Donkin. It has a lighthouse and stone pyramid monument upon which an inscription was placed by Donkin in honour of his late wife, Elizabeth, after whom the city was named.The Paul Sauer Bridge, better known as Storms River Bridge, has become symbolic for travellers along the Garden Route. It was the highest concrete arch in Africa at 120 metres above the river until the Bloukrans Bridge was built in 1984. The latter stands at 216 metres above the river. Both bridges are on the N2. (Image: Flickr, South African Tourism)In times long past, the home of elephants and, more recently, woodcutters, the village of Storms River attracts the curious tourist with its charm and special ambiance. With little lighting, silence and few people, it is perfect for anyone in search of a bit of solitude.Whatever your taste, you can find pristine beaches void of people or touristy resorts along the long Eastern Cape coast.The East London Golf Club, one of the oldest and best courses in the country, has hosted the South African Championships six times and the Africa Open Golf Challenge. Overlooking Nahoon Beach and Nature Reserve, it is considered a must-play course by golfers.The dolerite columns of the Valley of Desolation, just 14 kilometres from Graaff-Reinet, rise 120 metres from the valley floor. The nearby Camdeboo National Park, seen in the background, is known for its biodiversity, with more than 220 species of birdlife, 336 plants and 43 mammals. (Image: South African Tourism)last_img read more

Ten Common Mistakes Made By New Home Builders

first_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Designers and builders who do their homework before construction begins have few problems. Unfortunately, some projects happen backwards: the design and construction are well under way before the homework begins. That type of project can be problematic.At GBA, we see examples of the latter group all the time. Designers, builders, or homeowners who are in the middle of a construction project will post basic questions on our Q&A page. “I’m looking at the rafters and trying to decide how we should insulate the roof,” they write, or “We’re trying to figure out the best place to put the HRV.”Answering these questions is part of my job; however, I don’t look forward to another ten years of similar questions. I’d rather be unemployed.To help reach that goal — putting me out of the Q&A business — I’m providing a list of ten common mistakes. Let’s banish these blunders. Mistake #1: Forgot to install raised-heel trusses Raised-heel trusses should provide enough vertical space above the top plates of the exterior walls to allow for the installation of a generous depth of cellulose or fiberglass insulation, plus about 2 1/2 inches for a ventilation baffle and an air space.For a code-minimum home in Alabama, raised-heel trusses might need only 13 inches of vertical clearance at the top plates, while a pretty good house in northern Maine might need 19 inches of vertical clearance. First, figure out how much insulation you want to install, and then let the truss company know your needs when you place your truss order. Mistake #2: The insulation contractor did a bad job of installing fiberglass batts This age-old problem is still with us, as Carl Seville’s many blogs on the… center_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

ICC World Cup: Hosts ready to roll out their act

first_imgRatnakar Shetty, the 2011 World Cup tournament director, is confident the five venues that are yet to receive a final okay from the International Cricket Council (ICC) will be ready soon to host the matches. Mumbai’s Wankhede Stadium, which will host the final on April 2, is among the venues that are in the last stretch of being completed. But Shetty, who’s also the chief administrative officer of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), says the showpiece venue is just a few days from being ready.”It should be ready in the next 10 days. It’s only some finishing work in the corporate boxes and some other areas that has delayed the work a bit,” Shetty said in an interview with Mail Today. Kolkata’s Eden Gardens is the other venue that is behind the schedule. “It should be match-ready soon,” Shetty assured us. A joint team of the ICC and the BCCI inspected all the 13 venues in November. “One more inspection of three venues in Sri Lanka and of the Wankhede Stadium and Eden Gardens will take place some time in the third week of this month,” Shetty said. The Sri Lankan venues that are up for inspection are the R. Premadasa Stadium in Colombo, Mahinda Rajapaksa International Cricket Stadium in Sooriyawewa (Hambantota), and the Pallekele International Cricket Stadium in Kandy.Shetty exuded confidence.”The preparations are on track. I am not concerned about anything, except that many of the matches being played in the Indian sector don’t feature India,” he said.advertisementAnother issue the tournament director raised was that of ticket prices. “We have urged out state units to keep the ticket prices low,” Shetty said. “They should look at bringing in school and college students so that stadiums are not empty for matches where India is not playing. The tickets for these matches will be priced in such a way that more people can buy them. The ticket rates will be different at different venues,” he added.Continuing on the subject of crowd management, Shetty said, “Crowds come on their own for matches where India is playing because of their passion for the game. When two foreign teams play, the interest level is not the same. We noticed the difference during the Champions League T20 matches. The associations must think of ways in which they can bring the people to the stadiums.” The message that should go around is that there’s a lot to learn from World Cup matches even if India is not playing.last_img read more

10 months agoDyche’s bully reality: How Arsenal & Emery passed their latest test

first_imgTagsOpinionAbout the authorChris BeattieShare the loveHave your say Dyche’s bully reality: How Arsenal & Emery passed their latest testby Chris Beattie10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCOMMENT: Intimidation? Stand over tactics? That is, literal stand over tactics? Oh no, not on this Arsenal. It may’ve worked in the past. But as Sean Dyche and his Burnley discovered on Saturday. Unai Emery and his players are a very different proposition today.They tried, did Burnley. They really did try. Going into the game, Dyche promised Emery and Arsenal a dose of reality. “Reality tactics”, he dubbed it.And the Clarets manager was good to his word. The visitors threw everything at Arsenal. Wrestling. Stamping. As Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang remarked after his two goal performance, “Yes, it was a physical battle, it was really, really hard”.But this lot are no southern softies. Not when you have players like Sead Kolasinac and Sokratis ready to fight your corner. Not when even your manager is ready to give the opposition an earful. But they did try, did Burnley.Not once. But twice. Twice Ashley Barnes did his best Sergio Ramos impression, wrestling Sokratis to the Emirates turf. The first time ended with Barnes having the Gunners defender in a headlock. That was only after he had stood over his marker. But Sokratis was never going to be intimidated. Indeed, it was his reaction to Barnes’ antics that helped the Clarets striker escape a booking.Barnes only received a short word from ref Kevin Friend – no doubt helped out by Sokratis, as he put an own arm around his shoulder before asking, almost laughing as he did, “what dya think ya doin'”? The pair would be at it again later in the game, this time in the middle of the pitch. But just as before, they broke up without Friend brandishing a card.Then it was Matteo Guendouzi’s turn to be tested. But even this 19 year-old from France wasn’t to be cowed. Barnes – again – was the instigator, stamping a prostrate Guendouzi square on his chest. Again, there was no action shown by Friend. And for all the complaints about diving from Dyche in the aftermath, Guendouzi’s reaction was more Roy Keane than Neymar. Just as Sokratis had previously, Guendouzi’s response went some way to Barnes avoiding punishment. That Dyche complained about diving from the home team was baffling given the spot fires sparked around the pitch by his No10.But perhaps he was still coming down after copping it from Emery at the final whistle. A team reflects it’s manager. And this one – like so many on the pitch – is no shrinking violet.To be fair, this wasn’t Emery’s fight. And there really was no need for the Arsenal manager to get involved. But he’d had enough. Enough of Dyche’s bellowing. Enough of his complaining. Grabbing Dyche’s arm, he let him know what he thought of his antics. The pair squared up. It wasn’t Barnes versus Sokratis. But Emery wasn’t going to turn the other cheek.On paper, Arsenal should always be defeating Burnley at the Emirates. And the 3-1 scoreline stuck to script. But the manner of how these three points were achieved tells us everything about today’s Arsenal.They’re not a nasty team. Nor an overly physical one. But there’s a presence about them. There’s a bit of steel in there. From Soka and Seo to the kid from Lorient. You’re not going to intimidate this lot. There’s enough heavy duty in there to allow attacking players like Aubameyang the room to do their thing.Gary Neville, the former Manchester United captain, has branded past Arsenal teams, the ones of Arsene Wenger, as “soft”: “Technically they were as good as anything we’ve seen in England in my time. But there are all kinds of attributes that make up a football side and they didn’t like it when the contest became physical.”You always felt you had a chance against them because you could get about them, bully them.”And you fancy Dyche went into Saturday’s trip with the same sentiment.But this is a very different Arsenal from the team of the past decade. And the manager is certainly a polar opposite to what Dyche had grown used to finding upon Burnley’s visits to North London.As those around the Pemier League are fast realising. Emery’s Arsenal can outplay you. And outfight you. Whether it’s on the pitch. Or by the touchline. You can’t intimidate this lot. Just as “reality” snapped back at Dyche on Saturday.Dyche & Emery having a disagreement at FT. #twitterclarets#UTCpic.twitter.com/6Bi28yhv4p— TurfCast (@TurfCastPodcast) December 22, 2018 last_img read more

On Deck A Sabermetric Broadcast

Although sabermetrics has substantially reshaped baseball’s on-field product over the past few decades, its progress in the broadcast booth has been slower. It’s not hard to see why the two trends haven’t moved in lockstep: While teams adopted the analytics model out of the need to win games, the same market pressures didn’t apply to commentators. For teams, integrating sabermetrics meant they were more likely to win; for commentators, it meant they were more likely to confuse. But now a younger generation is steeped in analytics, and statistically minded fans obsessively check sites such as Fangraphs, Baseball-Reference and Brooks Baseball to get what broadcasts and talk radio aren’t providing.Broadcasters have taken note. In the past few years, we’ve seen some geeky milestones: Sun Sports produced a special sabermetric broadcast of a Tampa Bay Rays game, and WGN flashed a run expectancy matrix on screen during a Cubs broadcast. And Joe Morgan and Tim McCarver, not exactly standard-bearers for the analytics movement, are off the air.On Saturday, Fox Sports 1 is hoping to facilitate the next breakthrough for on-air stat-geekery. During Game 1 of the National League Championship Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and San Francisco Giants, the channel, working in conjunction with its Just A Bit Outside blog, is mounting a broadcast that promises to focus on “statistics, sabermetrics, and graphics, with plenty of debate and conversation while the action plays out on the field.” The show will feature a split-screen, with the game in one window and in the other a panel that includes longtime sabermetric proselytizer Rob Neyer and ex-players turned stat-friendly broadcasters Gabe Kapler and C.J. Nitkowski, not to mention current San Diego Padres manager Bud Black. It’s an experiment in whether mainstream America — or at least the America that watches Fox Sports 1 on a Saturday night — is finally ready for metrics to invade Morgan and McCarver’s former province.Kapler certainly seems to think it is, noting that plenty of numbers now widely used on TV (like WHIP and OPS) were once just as foreign to viewers as xFIP and Ultimate Zone Rating. “Baseball fans are ready to absorb metrics they can use to predict what’s coming,” he said.Along similar lines, Neyer hopes the JABO broadcast can put numbers to the baseball fundamentals that fans are used to. “We’ll be talking about the same things that everybody else talks about, just on a somewhat different — and ideally, higher — level,” he said.Neyer’s pet example is pitch framing. While most serious fans know that Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina is an expert in what Neyer calls “stealing” strikes on borderline pitches, the NLCS coverage will highlight the fact that Molina’s counterpart on the Giants, Buster Posey, is just as good at that dark art according to the numbers.But it won’t be all numbers. The coverage also aspires to effectively blend advanced statistics with the experience of the former players on hand, as well as Black’s managerial mindset. (For instance, in addition to a studio area, the set will also feature one of those whimsical mini-fields upon which Kapler and Nitkowski can perform hands-on demos.) Host Kevin Burkhardt will guide a running conversation that Kapler hopes will appeal to fans seeking hardcore analysis — statistical or otherwise.There’s a tension in any sabermetric treatment of baseball between the cool empiricism of numbers and the gauzy comfort of narrative. In the post-season that’s even more pronounced, because it’s so difficult to make sense of the randomness that short series bring. Neyer thinks the Fox broadcast can straddle that line.“We’re lucky, given the mix of the people who will be on the set, to do both things,” he said. “Gabe Kapler and C.J. Nitkowski are both quite well-versed in sabermetrics. … We can a cite a number, but [when an event] doesn’t fit the statistical narrative, Gabe Kapler can literally jump out of his chair … and demonstrate what happened, and why.”Everyone I talked to — including Kapler, Neyer and producer Matt Schnider — also emphasized that the broadcast will have room for debate between the sabermetric outlook and the conventional wisdom. “Those things do come up,” Neyer said. “One of the tricky things for us will be [when] somebody says something that maybe isn’t supported by the data, we’ve got to be able to jump in (on my laptop or with one of our researchers) quickly and find out if that’s true, and then get it out there and see if we can hash it out.”Perhaps the telecast, then, is better thought of as an update to the way baseball broadcasts are done, rather than a groundbreaking exercise in sabermetric programming. It will be the first televised, in-game manifestation of what Baseball Prospectus’s Dayn Perry famously described as the ideal marriage between sabermetrics and traditional thinking:“A question that’s sometimes posed goes something like this: ‘Should you run an organization with scouts or statistics?’ My answer is the same it would be if someone asked me: ‘Beer or tacos?’ Both, you fool. Why construct an either-or scenario where none need exist?”In a field where traditional broadcasts have clung to more or less the same format for half a century, the beer-and-tacos approach is a refreshing change of direction. read more

Wrestling team prepares for NCAA Tournament

Senior captain Colt Sponseller has had many goals since he joined the Ohio State wrestling team, none bigger than winning a National Championship. Entering his final NCAA Tournament, Sponseller has one opportunity left to make his dream a reality. “It’s my ultimate goal. It’s the goal I have had in mind since I came here to OSU,” Sponseller said. “To come out there and … go to nationals and win would be the icing on the cake.” In his two previous attempts in the NCAA Tournament, Sponseller has not lived up to his goals. In his final season as a Buckeye, the 2011 tournament is Sponseller’s final chance to reach the pinnacle of college wrestling. “It’s the last chance I have,” Sponseller said. “It’s one of the most important things in my life, and you’ve got to make it all count when it comes down to it.” Sponseller has been wrestling at OSU for the past four years. He has made two NCAA Tournament appearances and has failed to finish as an All-American or better. Coach Tom Ryan said helping Sponseller reach his goal is one of the most important things for his team at the NCAA Tournament. “We have one senior; it’s very important that he reaches his goals, which is to be a National Champion,” Ryan said. “It’s important that our senior goes out the right way.” Sponseller will compete as the No. 5 seed in the 165-pound bracket. Sponseller is not the only Buckeye going to the national tournament. Sophomore captains C.J. Magrum and Ian Paddock, and freshman Nick Heflin will also wrestle for a National Championship. They all qualified because of their finishes at the Big Ten Tournament. Freshman Peter Capone, 197 pounds, received an at-large bid into the tournament field. “I think it would be very good experience, and I definitely think I could win some matches,” Capone said. “(An All-American finish) would be the goal and I would just wrestle as hard as I can.” Magrum, who is unseeded, is coming off an impressive showing at the Big Ten Tournament, finishing fourth in the 184-pound weight class. After wrestling six matches during the weekend, Magrum, as well as the other Buckeyes, will return to the gym and begin preparing for the final tournament. “The first thing I need to do is heal up and get some rest,” Magrum said. “Then we’ll come back for a few days, then tapper down and get ready for NCAAs.” Magrum said the tournament is more about a mindset than physicality. “I think the NCAA Tournament is more mental than anything,” Magrum said. “Anyone could show up on any given day an All-American.” Heflin, who was disappointed with the runner-up finish at the Big Ten Tournament, said he will focus on the little things to have a better performance at the NCAA Tournament. “I need to keep just working hard, come in for morning practices, watch some tape on (Edward) Ruth’s match,” Heflin said. “Do all the little right things. Sleep right, eat right, just prepare perfectly.” Heflin will be the No. 10 seed at 174 pounds. After a disappointing regular season, Ryan said he still expects his team to perform well in the NCAA Tournament and expects to bring home a group of All-Americans. “I’d say a top-10 team performance would be good for us, with the season we’ve had,” Ryan said. “And we’ve got some of these underclassmen to step up, because they’re the leaders of the future and the leaders of next year’s team. It’d be nice to come home with a bunch of All-Americans and guys that are some underclassmen, ready to lead.” To accomplish this goal, Ryan said he expects his athletes to go after their opponents, while sporting a strong defense as well. “We need to wrestle tough. We need to be ready prepared mentally and physically and go after people,” Ryan said. “You need incredible defense and you got to pressure your opponent. So, if you do those things … we have a good shot at placing some people on the podium.” The 2011 NCAA Division I Championships will take place March 17-19 in Philadelphia. read more

Ohio State womens basketball wins season opener

For the 17th consecutive year, the Ohio State women’s basketball team opened its season with a victory as the Buckeyes knocked off Tennessee State, 78-51, Sunday at the Schottenstein Center. Ten players scored for the Buckeyes, with senior guard Samantha Prahalis and junior guard Tayler Hill leading the way with 17 points each. Freshman forward Kalpana Beach, in her first-ever game for OSU, contributed 10 points and six rebounds. Beach said she found out just before the game that she was starting. “I knew it was going to be a lot different than high school,” Beach said. “So I just was going to go out and play as hard as I could and try not to make too many mistakes.” “(Beach) was nervous before the game,” Hill said with a smile following the victory. OSU surged out to a 48-21 halftime lead, holding TSU to 30 percent shooting in the first half and not allowing any second-chance or fast-break points. The Tigers kept pace with the Buckeyes during the second half with both teams notching 30 points. Coach Jim Foster attributed the drop in production in the second half to inconsistent offensive play. “I thought we started the game very aggressively,” Foster said. “I think it’s difficult to play 12 people and continue with continuity on offense. I think that’s probably what showed in the second half.” With Prahalis as the lone senior to go along with three juniors on the roster, OSU is the youngest team in the Big Ten, according to NCAA data. Foster said the early games in the season are vital in the development of the younger players. “I think one of the things that a young team needs to learn is that when you come in at halftime and sit down you’ve got to continue to be engaged when you go out there for the second half, regardless of what the score is,” Foster said. For the game, the Buckeyes shot 48 percent from the field to go along with a 23-for-29 clip from the free-throw line. OSU held a decisive advantage in free-throw attempts, with TSU only generating nine attempts from the line. OSU suffered a bit of a scare late in the second half when Prahalis, voted co-Big Ten Preseason Player of the Year by the conference’s coaches, was helped off the court by trainers when she fell and cramped up. Prahalis returned to action a few minutes later to finish the contest and assured reporters following the game that she was fine. The Buckeyes take to the Schottenstein Center court again to play Temple at 6 p.m. on Friday. OSU defeated the Owls, 84-75, on the road last season. read more

Football Ohio State defensive line setting the bar high

Ohio State defensive linemen look on during the second half of the Buckeyes game against Nebraska on Nov. 5. The Buckeyes won 62-3. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorThe Ohio State football team has a fully loaded defensive line ready to not only control the line of scrimmage, but also dominate it.“We’ll be as good as anybody in America at defensive end,” Coach Urban Meyer said.Meyer referenced Big Ten Defensive Lineman of the Year, redshirt senior Tyquan Lewis, redshirt junior Sam Hubbard, sophomore Nick Bosa, senior Jalyn Holmes and redshirt sophomore defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones as the five premier defensive linemen on the team. With such high-profile players returning who have already played significant snaps, a concern is the possibility of complacency. However, that doesn’t seem to be the case for this unit. Lewis said the goal is to be the best defensive line all-time. “We’re all elite players, so we continue to push one another to the next level,” he said. “That’s what helps us become better and better — it’s a lot of competition between all of us.”Defensive line coach Larry Johnson said this unit is the best collective group he has had in a long time. He emphasized the closeness of this group by citing the collective bond and love that they share. He said Lewis and Holmes demonstrated this bond by forgoing the NFL Draft to return for their senior seasons. “The most important thing about these guys (is) they’re unselfish — they’re very unselfish players,” Johnson said. “They don’t care who starts, they don’t care who plays, as long as they play.”Honorable mention All-Big Ten defensive end Holmes said that the guys on the defensive line do not want to let each other down. He continually emphasized that winning is much more important than playing time. “We have that bond and we got that chemistry, Holmes said. “And we (are) playing for something bigger than ourselves.”Johnson referred to the depth of the defensive line and mentioned the improvements he has seen in redshirt sophomore defensive end Rashod Berry, sophomore defensive tackle Robert Landers, redshirt sophomore defensive tackle Jashon Cornell, redshirt freshman defensive tackle Malik Barrow, sophomore defensive end Jonathon Cooper and Honorable Mention All-Big Ten, redshirt senior Michael Hill. Honorable Mention All-Big Ten defensive end Hubbard played with former Buckeye defensive linemen Joey Bosa and Adolphus Washington, who both started as rookies in the NFL this past season. He said that this current defensive line could be even better as a whole.“I’ve played with a lot of great individuals. I don’t think, collectively, there’s been this much talent at his position since I’ve been here,” Hubbard said. “We have four guys who could start on any team in the country and we’re all playing together.”Along with Jones, Meyer said the staff has been thinking of ways of putting the five premier linemen on the field at one time, which would move a defensive end to linebacker. Per Johnson and multiple players, Hubbard has been practicing at the position during spring practice. Nick Bosa also emphasized the importance of getting all of the talent involved.“We have so many good players,” Bosa said. “It’s criminal to not have them on the field.” read more

Rep Miller Local residents will benefit from budget

first_img More funding for schools, public services in plan 27Apr Rep. Miller: Local residents will benefit from budget Categories: Miller News,Miller Photos,Newscenter_img State Rep. Aaron Miller today voted in favor of the state budget, joining his colleagues on the House Appropriations Committee in approving the fiscal blueprint and sending it to the full House for consideration.Miller, of Sturgis, who serves as chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on State Police, said local K-12 classrooms will see more money and local governments will see modest increases in revenue sharing and dollars from the Michigan Transportation Fund, enabling them to improve vital services to residents.“As a teacher, I am disappointed the House budget does not continue to give extra to our schools, which are all at the lowest per-pupil funding in the state. However, I am extremely pleased that we are at least funding a $100-per-student increase, taking steps to ensure our children are prepared for a global workforce,” Miller said. “And not only does this budget put more state police troopers on the roads throughout Michigan, but this budget continues to pay down debt and save for future hard times, something I’m proud of.”Highlights of the bill:Helping make life better in communities across Michigan by adding money for road repairs, public safety departments, parks and other programs to improve our daily lives. Revenue sharing payments to local governments will rise by $12.4 million under our plan, more money than in the past five years.Michigan’s K-12 public schools would get record funding at $14.3 billion, with a priority on keeping more money in the classroom to benefit students. School districts across the state would get $100 more per student at each grade level, equating to a $143 million increase.Funding for career and technical training would increase through competitive grants for equipment upgrades and for intermediate school districts to hire counselors. The programs are designed to help prepare Michigan students for jobs of the future.Building a better economic future by paying down school retiree debt and adding to the state’s main savings account for tough times, pushing the emergency fund above $1 billion.Continuing to tighten our belt by eliminating waste and inefficiency in state government.Our goal is to spend less state money in the next budget year than we are today, and we achieved that with a 2.2 percent reduction in the general state budget.#####last_img read more