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Sheriff Gore on California Senate Bill 1421 and Womens History Month

first_img KUSI Newsroom Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Sheriff Gore joined Good Morning San Diego to discuss California Senate Bill 1421 (SB-1421) and Women’s History Month.Link to an FAQ on the Sheriff’s Department and SB-1421: https://www.sdsheriff.net/documents/CPRA-FAQ.pdfThe William B. Kolender Sheriff’s Museum in Old Town has an exhibit showcasing women in law enforcement during Women’s History Month in March. Posted: March 13, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, Sheriff Gore on California Senate Bill 1421 and Women’s History Month March 13, 2019last_img read more

Watchmen teaser trailer for new HBO series takes fans to eerie universe

first_img Share your voice Tick-tock, tick-tock. The teaser trailer for HBO’s upcoming Watchmen series came out on Wednesday, and you shouldn’t watch it if you’re disturbed by masked faces or ticking clocks. They fill the eerie trailer, which doesn’t reveal any spoilers, but is set in an alternate universe where superheroes are forced to become outlaws.The series adapts Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ graphic novel of the same name, and stars Jeremy Irons, Regina King, Don Johnson, Louis Gossett Jr., Frances Fisher and Tim Blake Nelson. The first season will have eight episodes, and Damon Lindelof of Lost fame is the show creator. A 2009 movie was also based on the series.With all the clock-ticking, the teaser still manages to not reveal a premiere date, only citing “fall.” HBO may be needing a new hot show by then, as blockbuster Game of Thrones only has two episodes left.Here’s everything we know about HBO’s Watchmen so far. Tags HBO Post a comment 0 187 Photos See all the Game of Thrones season 8 photos TV and Movieslast_img read more

Meet unique bike rider of India Sanil Tiwari aka Fakira Rider

first_imgSanil Tiwari aka Fakira RiderPR HandoutRiding motorcycle for days and night from one state to another gives incredible satisfaction that only riders can feel. It makes you feel free and close to nature. Real adventure is when you ride bikes through high altitude places and move through roads curves and bumps. You can never feel the nature’s beauty in the car, the glimpse of this beauty can only be achieved on bikes.There is one bike lover who never used the bike in his 36 years of life, and now he is not driving car because of his love for bikes. One of the most exciting person of our time a real rider who has rode on his bike to travel every place of India from Kanyakumari to Kashmir he has seen everything with his bike, very well known as ‘Fakira Riders’.Fakira sounds unusual name. Actually, there is a story behind it, the actual name of Mr Fakirs is Sanil Tiwari, he got his name from Osho when he took an ascetic from Osho ashram he got his new name as Swami Anand Fakira. Moreover, to find his name meaning or we can say to justify his name, he started travelling around India.Fakira has travelled all around India to every state of India Mumbai to Sikkim, Kanyakumari to Sikkim, He has more than 230k subscribers on YouTube as his followers and more than 11,281,858 views. He has represented many places and people of India through his videos, which have been loved by everyone.Fakira is a nature lover, heat, rain, cold, smell of soil, when raindrop falls, every road, every mountain, rivers, he just loves his life, he feels that it makes him feel free from tension and he also feels everyone should try riding. It gives you fantastic feeling when you come close to nature you forget everything in life.His motive of posting videos is to drive people with his positive thoughts through his videos. Fakira feels that nature teaches you the meaning of life when you get closer to it. He is India’s unique personality, which is rare to find, for him, life is about riding a bike from one place to another, enjoy nature, meet people.last_img read more

Three dead as clashes erupt over Jerusalem holy site

first_imgTear gas fumes billow during clashes between Palestinian protesters and Israeli forces after Friday prayers at the main entrance of the West bank city of Bethlehem on 21 July 2017 at a protest against new Israeli security measures implemented at Al-Aqsa mosque complex, known to Jews as the Temple Mount, in Jerusalem. The new security measures include metal detectors, security cameras, and barring men under 50 from entering the Old City for Friday Muslim prayers, following an attack that killed two Israeli policemen the previous week. Photo: AFP Three Palestinians were killed and dozens wounded Friday as clashes erupted between protesters and Israeli forces over new security measures at an ultra-sensitive Jerusalem holy site where police restricted access for Muslim prayers.One Palestinian was shot dead by Israeli gunfire in the A-Tur neighbourhood of east Jerusalem, according to the Palestinian health ministry.A second Palestinian was killed by gunfire in east Jerusalem’s Ras al-Amud neighbourhood, while a third was shot dead in Abu Dis in the occupied West Bank, the ministry said, without providing details on the circumstances.Israel’s army confirmed it was involved in clashes in Abu Dis.The unrest came after Israeli ministers decided not to order the removal of metal detectors erected at entrances to the Haram al-Sharif compound, known to Jews as the Temple Mount, following an attack nearby a week ago that killed two policemen.In anticipation of protests on Friday, Israeli police barred men under 50 from entering Jerusalem’s Old City for prayers, while all women were allowed in.Police said later in the day that discretion could be applied in the use of the metal detectors instead of forcing everyone to go through them.But Palestinian and religious leaders were still calling on worshippers not to enter until they were removed.Hundreds held midday prayers near the gates of the Old City in protest. According to police, dozens of people entered the compound.Crowds gathered outside Jerusalem’s Old City found shops closed and streets around Damascus Gate — the entrance most heavily used by Palestinians — blocked.A group of several hundred people, including Muslim leaders, marched towards the Lions Gate entrance to the mosque compound, but police informed them that only men aged 50 or over would be allowed in.Police later fired stun grenades and tear gas towards protesters outside the Old City, while Palestinians threw stones and other objects at security forces in some areas.The Palestinian Red Crescent reported that 109 people were wounded in Jerusalem, of whom 38 were taken to hospital. No injury toll was given for the West Bank.”They turned back everyone who came here to pray but then I told them I was going to the doctor, but they did not let me in,” said Ulfat Hamad, 42, who was visiting from the United States.”I am going to pray here with others,” he said outside the walls.- ‘Extremely dangerous’ -Tensions have risen since police installed the metal detectors in a move Palestinians and other Muslims perceive as a means for Israel to assert further control over the compound containing the revered Al-Aqsa mosque and Dome of the Rock.The controversy has resonated beyond Israel and the Palestinian territories, with the United States and the UN Middle East envoy expressing concern.Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas spoke with US counterpart Donald Trump’s senior adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner.He urged the US administration to immediately intervene, warning the situation was “extremely dangerous and might spiral out of control,” the Palestinians’ official Wafa news agency reported.Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan too has called on Israel to remove the detectors. He spoke by telephone with both Abbas and Israeli President Reuven Rivlin on Thursday.Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu stressed the metal detectors were intended to ensure the safety of worshippers and visitors and not an attempt to disturb the fragile status quo under which Jordan is custodian of the site and Jewish prayer is forbidden.Palestinians have been refusing to enter the compound all week in protest at the metal detectors.The main weekly prayers on Fridays draw the largest number of worshippers — typically thousands — and speculation had been mounting that Netanyahu might order the metal detectors removed.But after consultations with security chiefs and members of his security cabinet, Netanyahu decided not to do so.Police said they had boosted their forces in and around the Old City, with units “mobilised in all areas and neighbourhoods”.- Day of ‘rage’ -The metal detectors were put in place following a gun and knife attack near the holy compound that killed two Israeli policemen on July 14.Three Arab Israeli assailants fled to the compound after the attack, where they were shot dead by security forces.Israeli police said the weapons were smuggled into the holy site which was then used as the launchpad for the attack.Israel initially closed the compound for two days following the attack in a highly unusual move, shutting it for last Friday’s prayers.It said the closure was necessary for security checks.Israel began reopening it on Sunday, but with metal detectors in place to prevent weapons being smuggled inside.In the Gaza Strip, Islamist movement Hamas had called for a day of “rage” on Friday over the measures.In the city of Hebron in the occupied West Bank, Palestinians also prayed outside in support of the Al-Aqsa protests and clashed with Israeli soldiers.The Haram al-Sharif/Temple Mount is central to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.It lies in east Jerusalem, seized by Israel in the 1967 Six-Day War and later annexed in a move never recognised by the international community.It is considered the third holiest site in Islam and the most sacred for Jews.last_img read more

Political Roundup Rep Conyers Resigns And Senate Republicans Pass Tax Bill

first_img Share It’s time again for the Houston Matters weekly political roundup with analysis of national, state, and local political stories with an eye for how it all might affect Houston and Texas.Some of the stories we discuss this week include Senate Republicans passing a $1.4 trillion tax bill, Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) stepping down from Congress amid allegations of sexual misconduct, and the U.S. Supreme Court taking up the case of a baker who refused to create cakes for same-sex weddings.Our panel of experts this week includes: Jeremi Suri from UT-Austin and Andrew Schneider, politics and government reporter for News 88.7. 00:00 /12:42 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: X Listenlast_img read more

UPDATE Lawmakers Push Zuckerberg On Security Diversity Drug Sales On Facebook

first_imgFacebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg prepares to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33. Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesA few of the other topics discussed in the hearing:What is Facebook? Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., committee chairman, noted that Facebook has exclusive broadcasting deals as well as tools that allow people to transfer money.“Is Facebook a media company?” he asked. “Is Facebook a financial institution?”Zuckerberg replied: “I consider us to be a technology company because the primary thing that we do is have engineers that write code and build products and services for other people. There are certainly other things that we do do. … We build planes to help connect people, and I don’t consider us to be an aerospace company.”Facebook has been testing planes that broadcast Internet signals to the ground.Does Facebook’s data collection amount to surveillance of users? Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., accused Facebook of “the wholesale invasion and manipulation of users’ right to privacy.”“What is the difference between Facebook’s methodology and the methodology of the American political pariah J. Edgar Hoover?” he asked, referring to the former FBI director.“The difference is extremely clear, which is that on Facebook you have control over your information,” Zuckerberg said. “The content that you share, you put there. … The information that we collect, you can choose to have us not collect. You can delete any of it, and of course, you can leave Facebook if you want.“I know of no surveillance organization that gives people the option to delete the data that they have or even know what they’re collecting,” Zuckerberg said.Do consumers understand what they’ve agreed to as they use Facebook? Walden asked Zuckerberg, “Did it ever cross your mind that you should be communicating more clearly with users about how Facebook is monetizing their data?”“I would say that we do try to explain what we do as time goes on,” Zuckerberg said. Every time someone adds content to Facebook, he said, there is “a control right there about who you want to share it with. … I think that in the product that’s quite clear. I do think that we can do a better job of explaining how our advertising works.”Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Texas, approached the same question from a different angle. “Can the average layperson look at the terms and conditions and make the evaluation: Is this strong enough protection for me to enter into this arrangement?” he asked.Zuckerberg said, “I think if someone wanted to know that they could, but a lot of people probably just accept terms of service without taking the time to read through it. I view our responsibility not as just legally complying with laying it out, getting that consent, but actually trying to make sure that people understand what’s happening throughout the product.”He repeatedly said he believes users do understand how their data will be used. Multiple lawmakers expressed skepticism on that point.The question of financial penaltiesIn an occasionally tense exchange, Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., challenged Zuckerberg over his company’s billions of dollars in profit and what she described as the lack of financial penalty over prior privacy breaches.She cited two settled class-action lawsuits — Lane v. Facebook, in which users received no compensation, and Fraley v. Facebook, in which users received $15 each. DeGette expressed surprise when Zuckerberg said he was not familiar with the details of the cases.She also asked whether there was a financial penalty involved after a Federal Trade Commission investigation ended in a 2011 consent decree. Zuckerberg said he couldn’t remember, which prompted more skepticism from DeGette.“The reason you probably don’t remember is because the FTC doesn’t have the authority to issue penalties for first-time violations,” she said.“We continue to have these abuses and these data breaches, but at the same time, it doesn’t seem like future activities are prevented,” DeGette said. “I think one of the things that we need to look at in the future … is putting really robust penalties in place in case of improper actions.” On racial diversity within Facebook’s staff and leadershipCongressional Black Caucus member Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., said that Facebook lists five leaders on its website, none of whom are black. “This does not reflect America,” he said.“We have a broader leadership than just five people,” Zuckerberg said.“Do you plan to add an African-American to your leadership team in the foreseeable future and will you commit that you will continue to work with us, the Congressional Black Caucus, to increase diversity within your company?“Congressman, we will certainly work with you,” Zuckerberg said. “This is an important issue.”Butterfield asked for data on the retention of employees by race; Zuckerberg said he would discuss it with his team.Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-N.Y., also pushed Zuckerberg hard on the question of diversity, tying the “monolithic” makeup of the company to Facebook’s failures to anticipate and prevent disinformation campaigns. After five hours of testimony before a joint session of two Senate committees on Tuesday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg returned to the Capitol for a second straight day of grilling — this time before the House.For another five hours on Wednesday, Zuckerberg took questions from the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Representatives took a generally sharp tone, pushing Zuckerberg to commit to “yes or no” answers and occasionally exclaiming with mock surprise when he protested that he couldn’t answer.And the questions extended far beyond questions of security, privacy and data-sharing, addressing diversity at Facebook headquarters and whether the company is tacitly allowing illegal drug sales on the platform.The congressional hearings, Zuckerberg’s first, come in the wake of a scandal in which Facebook user data was sold to Cambridge Analytica, a third-party group that assisted the Trump campaign. (Cambridge Analytica saysit did not use the Facebook data in its 2016 election work.)Zuckerberg has repeatedly apologized for the Cambridge Analytica scandal, while blaming the information-sharing on a researcher who, according to Facebook, violated the platform’s terms of service.Zuckerberg says he found out that the data was sold to Cambridge Analytica after The Guardian reported on the issue.“Do you routinely learn about these violations through the press?” Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Pa., asked on Wednesday.“Sometimes we do,” Zuckerberg said.He told members of the House that his own data was included in the privacy breach. Zuckerberg said Facebook relies on users flagging inappropriate content to be taken down. He said with billions of pieces of content shared daily, it was not feasible for the company to examine all those posts. But he said the company hopes to use artificial intelligence tools to help flag inappropriate content.On Facebook’s collection of data on non-Facebook users Zuckerberg’s congressional testimony has focused on how Facebook handles user data. But Rep. Ben Luján, D-N.M., pushed Zuckerberg on how exactly Facebook uses the data of people who are not users of the service.Their conversation went like this: Is Facebook doing enough to stop opioid sales?Rep. David McKinley, R-W.Va., brought up America’s opioid crisis and posted a photo of drugs available for sale on Facebook, no prescription necessary.“Your platform is still being used to circumvent the law and allow people to buy highly addictive drugs without a prescription,” he said. “Facebook is actually enabling an illegal activity, and in so doing, you are hurting people.”Zuckerberg replied, “There are a number of areas of content that we need to do a better job policing on our service.”“You’ve said before you were going to take down those ads but you didn’t do it,” McKinley said. “When are you going to take them down? … Where is your accountability to allow this to be occurring?”center_img How does Facebook use information it collects, as opposed to what users provide?In his testimony, Zuckerberg has consistently emphasized the information people voluntarily supply to Facebook — photos they upload, status updates they write, pages they click “like” on. He says people own that data and can delete it at any time. He also stresses that Facebook, while it uses that data to power its ad business, does not sell the data itself to advertisers.Rep. Joe Kennedy, D-Mass., pressed Zuckerberg on something different — the “metadata” about users that Facebook gathers without users uploading it themselves. That includes things like when and how users access Facebook and what they click on or look at, including on sites other than Facebook. (The Wall Street Journal recently published a visual breakdown of data provided vs. data collected by various platforms.)“There’s an awful lot of information that is generated that people don’t think that they’re generating, and that advertisers are being able to target because Facebook collects it,” Kennedy said.“Yes,” Zuckerberg said. “My understanding is that the targeting options that are available for advertisers are generally things that are based on what people share. Now, once an advertiser chooses how they want to target something, Facebook also does its own work to rank and determine which ads are going to be interesting to which people. So we may use metadata or other behaviors of what you’ve shown that you’re interested in in news feeds or other places in order to make our systems more relevant to you, but that’s a little bit different from giving that as an option to an advertiser.”“I don’t understand how users then own that data,” Kennedy said. He then ran out of time for questions.On its business help pages, Facebook tells advertisers it can target ads based on, among other things, users’ purchase behaviors and “activities people engage in on and off Facebook.”Members of Congress also asked pointed questions about how Facebook will defend civil rights — by preventing housing discrimination in advertising, for instance — whether the platform suppresses conservative speech or might in the future, and the degree of responsibility Facebook has over content on its platform, including disinformation.On Tuesday, the hearing before the Senate covered many of the same topics as well.As NPR’s Peter Overby reported earlier this week, Facebook — like Silicon Valley in general — has grown more involved in Washington politics over the years: Luján: “Facebook has detailed profiles on people who have never signed up for Facebook, yes or no?”Zuckerberg: “In general, we collect data from people who have not signed up from Facebook for security purposes.” Luján: “… On average, how many data points does Facebook have on each Facebook user?”Zuckerberg: “I do not know off the top of my head.”Luján: “The average for non-Facebook platforms is 1,500. It’s been reported that Facebook has as many as 29,000 data points for an average Facebook user. Do you know how many points of data Facebook has on the average non-Facebook user?”Zuckerberg: “Congressman, I do not off the top off my head, but I can have our team get back to you afterwards.”Luján: “I’d appreciate that. It’s been admitted by Facebook that you do collect data points on non-Facebook users, so my question is, can someone who does not have a Facebook account opt out of Facebook’s involuntary data collection?”Zuckerberg: “Congressman, anyone can turn off and opt out of any data collection for ads, whether they use our services or not, but in order to prevent people from scraping public information … we need to know when someone is trying to repeatedly access our services … “Luján: “You’ve said everyone controls their data, but you are collecting data on people who are not even Facebook users, that have never signed a consent, a privacy agreement, and you’re collecting their data. And it may surprise you that on Facebook’s page, when you go to ‘I don’t have a Facebook account and would like to request all my personal data stored by Facebook,’ it takes you to a form that says, ‘Go to your Facebook page and then on your account settings you can download your data.’  … You’re directing people who that don’t even have a Facebook page to have to sign up for a page to reach their data. We’ve got to fix that.” “Facebook opened its D.C. office when it was five years old — and already worth billions. It routinely hires lots of top-tier, veteran lobbyists, as does Google.“The current lobbying environment is ideal. Many lawmakers still don’t fully grasp the technology. Congress long ago defunded its in-house technology office, which could have taught them.“Facebook reported its 2017 lobbying cost at nearly $12 million. Google spent even more: $18 million. … Some of the money goes to think tanks, where experts can shape policy debates on Capitol Hill. … Then there’s campaign money. …“Facebook’s PAC and employees made political contributions totaling $4.5 million in the 2016 cycle, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics. For Google’s parent company, Alphabet, the total was nearly $8 million.” Sharelast_img read more