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RMLD Launches New MobileFriendly Website

first_imgREADING, MA — Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) is pleased to announce the launch of its new mobile-friendly website. The site, which went live on June 1, 2018, also offers improved navigation and search functionality, and is intended to provide customers a more user-friendly online experience. RMLD’s web address remains www.rmld.com.RMLD’s website contains information on RMLD programs and events, energy efficiency tips, and allows customers to pay their electric bill, report an outage, sign up for service, and more.To further improve operating efficiency and customer communication, RMLD is implementing an Outage Management System (OMS) within the next few months. Once implemented, customers will be able to access an outage map through RMLD.com to get real time information and updates on area outages. A customer notification system that sends specific outage information to affected areas via multiple channels such as phone, text, and email is also being evaluated and is expected to be implemented within the next two years.(NOTE: The above press release is from RMLD.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSAVE THE DATE: RMLD To Hold Family-Friendly Open House On October 10In “Community”RMLD Cuts Ribbon For New Battery Energy Storage SystemIn “Government”RMLD Invites Customers To Attend Free Electric Car Show In Wilmington On September 15In “Community”last_img read more

2020 VW Golf slated for techrich October debut report says

first_img 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Originally, it was believed that the 2020 Volkswagen Golf would make its debut at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September, perhaps alongside the ID electric hatchback’s production form. Now, a new report points to a later debut, but based on what the Golf will carry with it, the wait sounds worth it.The eighth-generation Volkswagen Golf is currently scheduled to make its formal debut in October, Automotive News Europe reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the matter. There are, according to ANE, two reasons for this: First, Volkswagen wants the ID to steal the spotlight at the show, as it’s a pretty important vehicle for the automaker; also, as earlier reports noted, VW did have some software setbacks to work through.But the Golf that shows itself to the world in October will be reportedly worth the weight. ANE’s report says that the eighth generation is positioning itself as “the benchmark for connectivity.” Standard features will allegedly include lane-keep assist, LED headlights and a massive digital cockpit in addition to a center-console screen no smaller than 8.25 inches.In addition to all that kit, most of which is currently relegated to more expensive Golf trims, there’s some interesting digital tech in there. The vehicle will reportedly be capable of vehicle-to-x communication, likely using the DSRC standard (802.11p) that the automaker has championed in the past. The new Golf should also carry a digital key option, which allows the vehicle to be opened using a phone instead of a key, although it’s unclear if this technology will rely on near-field communication like Hyundai’s, or if it will use Bluetooth Low Energy like the Tesla Model 3.The 2020 VW Golf will enter production in Wolfsburg, Germany, in the third quarter of 2019, the report says. Europe will be first to take a crack at the new hatchback; as with generations past, it’ll take about a year or so for the new Golf to make its way to the US. Hatchbacks Future Cars Tags 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Volkswagen Review • 2018 Volkswagen Golf Sportwagen: Stirring sensibility 23 Photoscenter_img 1 More From Roadshow 2018 Volkswagen Golf GTI is a hot hatch for grown-ups Comment More about 2018 Volkswagen Golf Sportwagen Share your voice Volkswagenlast_img read more

Meet unique bike rider of India Sanil Tiwari aka Fakira Rider

first_imgSanil Tiwari aka Fakira RiderPR HandoutRiding motorcycle for days and night from one state to another gives incredible satisfaction that only riders can feel. It makes you feel free and close to nature. Real adventure is when you ride bikes through high altitude places and move through roads curves and bumps. You can never feel the nature’s beauty in the car, the glimpse of this beauty can only be achieved on bikes.There is one bike lover who never used the bike in his 36 years of life, and now he is not driving car because of his love for bikes. One of the most exciting person of our time a real rider who has rode on his bike to travel every place of India from Kanyakumari to Kashmir he has seen everything with his bike, very well known as ‘Fakira Riders’.Fakira sounds unusual name. Actually, there is a story behind it, the actual name of Mr Fakirs is Sanil Tiwari, he got his name from Osho when he took an ascetic from Osho ashram he got his new name as Swami Anand Fakira. Moreover, to find his name meaning or we can say to justify his name, he started travelling around India.Fakira has travelled all around India to every state of India Mumbai to Sikkim, Kanyakumari to Sikkim, He has more than 230k subscribers on YouTube as his followers and more than 11,281,858 views. He has represented many places and people of India through his videos, which have been loved by everyone.Fakira is a nature lover, heat, rain, cold, smell of soil, when raindrop falls, every road, every mountain, rivers, he just loves his life, he feels that it makes him feel free from tension and he also feels everyone should try riding. It gives you fantastic feeling when you come close to nature you forget everything in life.His motive of posting videos is to drive people with his positive thoughts through his videos. Fakira feels that nature teaches you the meaning of life when you get closer to it. He is India’s unique personality, which is rare to find, for him, life is about riding a bike from one place to another, enjoy nature, meet people.last_img read more

UPDATE Lawmakers Push Zuckerberg On Security Diversity Drug Sales On Facebook

first_imgFacebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg prepares to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33. Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesA few of the other topics discussed in the hearing:What is Facebook? Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., committee chairman, noted that Facebook has exclusive broadcasting deals as well as tools that allow people to transfer money.“Is Facebook a media company?” he asked. “Is Facebook a financial institution?”Zuckerberg replied: “I consider us to be a technology company because the primary thing that we do is have engineers that write code and build products and services for other people. There are certainly other things that we do do. … We build planes to help connect people, and I don’t consider us to be an aerospace company.”Facebook has been testing planes that broadcast Internet signals to the ground.Does Facebook’s data collection amount to surveillance of users? Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., accused Facebook of “the wholesale invasion and manipulation of users’ right to privacy.”“What is the difference between Facebook’s methodology and the methodology of the American political pariah J. Edgar Hoover?” he asked, referring to the former FBI director.“The difference is extremely clear, which is that on Facebook you have control over your information,” Zuckerberg said. “The content that you share, you put there. … The information that we collect, you can choose to have us not collect. You can delete any of it, and of course, you can leave Facebook if you want.“I know of no surveillance organization that gives people the option to delete the data that they have or even know what they’re collecting,” Zuckerberg said.Do consumers understand what they’ve agreed to as they use Facebook? Walden asked Zuckerberg, “Did it ever cross your mind that you should be communicating more clearly with users about how Facebook is monetizing their data?”“I would say that we do try to explain what we do as time goes on,” Zuckerberg said. Every time someone adds content to Facebook, he said, there is “a control right there about who you want to share it with. … I think that in the product that’s quite clear. I do think that we can do a better job of explaining how our advertising works.”Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Texas, approached the same question from a different angle. “Can the average layperson look at the terms and conditions and make the evaluation: Is this strong enough protection for me to enter into this arrangement?” he asked.Zuckerberg said, “I think if someone wanted to know that they could, but a lot of people probably just accept terms of service without taking the time to read through it. I view our responsibility not as just legally complying with laying it out, getting that consent, but actually trying to make sure that people understand what’s happening throughout the product.”He repeatedly said he believes users do understand how their data will be used. Multiple lawmakers expressed skepticism on that point.The question of financial penaltiesIn an occasionally tense exchange, Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., challenged Zuckerberg over his company’s billions of dollars in profit and what she described as the lack of financial penalty over prior privacy breaches.She cited two settled class-action lawsuits — Lane v. Facebook, in which users received no compensation, and Fraley v. Facebook, in which users received $15 each. DeGette expressed surprise when Zuckerberg said he was not familiar with the details of the cases.She also asked whether there was a financial penalty involved after a Federal Trade Commission investigation ended in a 2011 consent decree. Zuckerberg said he couldn’t remember, which prompted more skepticism from DeGette.“The reason you probably don’t remember is because the FTC doesn’t have the authority to issue penalties for first-time violations,” she said.“We continue to have these abuses and these data breaches, but at the same time, it doesn’t seem like future activities are prevented,” DeGette said. “I think one of the things that we need to look at in the future … is putting really robust penalties in place in case of improper actions.” On racial diversity within Facebook’s staff and leadershipCongressional Black Caucus member Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., said that Facebook lists five leaders on its website, none of whom are black. “This does not reflect America,” he said.“We have a broader leadership than just five people,” Zuckerberg said.“Do you plan to add an African-American to your leadership team in the foreseeable future and will you commit that you will continue to work with us, the Congressional Black Caucus, to increase diversity within your company?“Congressman, we will certainly work with you,” Zuckerberg said. “This is an important issue.”Butterfield asked for data on the retention of employees by race; Zuckerberg said he would discuss it with his team.Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-N.Y., also pushed Zuckerberg hard on the question of diversity, tying the “monolithic” makeup of the company to Facebook’s failures to anticipate and prevent disinformation campaigns. After five hours of testimony before a joint session of two Senate committees on Tuesday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg returned to the Capitol for a second straight day of grilling — this time before the House.For another five hours on Wednesday, Zuckerberg took questions from the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Representatives took a generally sharp tone, pushing Zuckerberg to commit to “yes or no” answers and occasionally exclaiming with mock surprise when he protested that he couldn’t answer.And the questions extended far beyond questions of security, privacy and data-sharing, addressing diversity at Facebook headquarters and whether the company is tacitly allowing illegal drug sales on the platform.The congressional hearings, Zuckerberg’s first, come in the wake of a scandal in which Facebook user data was sold to Cambridge Analytica, a third-party group that assisted the Trump campaign. (Cambridge Analytica saysit did not use the Facebook data in its 2016 election work.)Zuckerberg has repeatedly apologized for the Cambridge Analytica scandal, while blaming the information-sharing on a researcher who, according to Facebook, violated the platform’s terms of service.Zuckerberg says he found out that the data was sold to Cambridge Analytica after The Guardian reported on the issue.“Do you routinely learn about these violations through the press?” Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Pa., asked on Wednesday.“Sometimes we do,” Zuckerberg said.He told members of the House that his own data was included in the privacy breach. Zuckerberg said Facebook relies on users flagging inappropriate content to be taken down. He said with billions of pieces of content shared daily, it was not feasible for the company to examine all those posts. But he said the company hopes to use artificial intelligence tools to help flag inappropriate content.On Facebook’s collection of data on non-Facebook users Zuckerberg’s congressional testimony has focused on how Facebook handles user data. But Rep. Ben Luján, D-N.M., pushed Zuckerberg on how exactly Facebook uses the data of people who are not users of the service.Their conversation went like this: Is Facebook doing enough to stop opioid sales?Rep. David McKinley, R-W.Va., brought up America’s opioid crisis and posted a photo of drugs available for sale on Facebook, no prescription necessary.“Your platform is still being used to circumvent the law and allow people to buy highly addictive drugs without a prescription,” he said. “Facebook is actually enabling an illegal activity, and in so doing, you are hurting people.”Zuckerberg replied, “There are a number of areas of content that we need to do a better job policing on our service.”“You’ve said before you were going to take down those ads but you didn’t do it,” McKinley said. “When are you going to take them down? … Where is your accountability to allow this to be occurring?”center_img How does Facebook use information it collects, as opposed to what users provide?In his testimony, Zuckerberg has consistently emphasized the information people voluntarily supply to Facebook — photos they upload, status updates they write, pages they click “like” on. He says people own that data and can delete it at any time. He also stresses that Facebook, while it uses that data to power its ad business, does not sell the data itself to advertisers.Rep. Joe Kennedy, D-Mass., pressed Zuckerberg on something different — the “metadata” about users that Facebook gathers without users uploading it themselves. That includes things like when and how users access Facebook and what they click on or look at, including on sites other than Facebook. (The Wall Street Journal recently published a visual breakdown of data provided vs. data collected by various platforms.)“There’s an awful lot of information that is generated that people don’t think that they’re generating, and that advertisers are being able to target because Facebook collects it,” Kennedy said.“Yes,” Zuckerberg said. “My understanding is that the targeting options that are available for advertisers are generally things that are based on what people share. Now, once an advertiser chooses how they want to target something, Facebook also does its own work to rank and determine which ads are going to be interesting to which people. So we may use metadata or other behaviors of what you’ve shown that you’re interested in in news feeds or other places in order to make our systems more relevant to you, but that’s a little bit different from giving that as an option to an advertiser.”“I don’t understand how users then own that data,” Kennedy said. He then ran out of time for questions.On its business help pages, Facebook tells advertisers it can target ads based on, among other things, users’ purchase behaviors and “activities people engage in on and off Facebook.”Members of Congress also asked pointed questions about how Facebook will defend civil rights — by preventing housing discrimination in advertising, for instance — whether the platform suppresses conservative speech or might in the future, and the degree of responsibility Facebook has over content on its platform, including disinformation.On Tuesday, the hearing before the Senate covered many of the same topics as well.As NPR’s Peter Overby reported earlier this week, Facebook — like Silicon Valley in general — has grown more involved in Washington politics over the years: Luján: “Facebook has detailed profiles on people who have never signed up for Facebook, yes or no?”Zuckerberg: “In general, we collect data from people who have not signed up from Facebook for security purposes.” Luján: “… On average, how many data points does Facebook have on each Facebook user?”Zuckerberg: “I do not know off the top of my head.”Luján: “The average for non-Facebook platforms is 1,500. It’s been reported that Facebook has as many as 29,000 data points for an average Facebook user. Do you know how many points of data Facebook has on the average non-Facebook user?”Zuckerberg: “Congressman, I do not off the top off my head, but I can have our team get back to you afterwards.”Luján: “I’d appreciate that. It’s been admitted by Facebook that you do collect data points on non-Facebook users, so my question is, can someone who does not have a Facebook account opt out of Facebook’s involuntary data collection?”Zuckerberg: “Congressman, anyone can turn off and opt out of any data collection for ads, whether they use our services or not, but in order to prevent people from scraping public information … we need to know when someone is trying to repeatedly access our services … “Luján: “You’ve said everyone controls their data, but you are collecting data on people who are not even Facebook users, that have never signed a consent, a privacy agreement, and you’re collecting their data. And it may surprise you that on Facebook’s page, when you go to ‘I don’t have a Facebook account and would like to request all my personal data stored by Facebook,’ it takes you to a form that says, ‘Go to your Facebook page and then on your account settings you can download your data.’  … You’re directing people who that don’t even have a Facebook page to have to sign up for a page to reach their data. We’ve got to fix that.” “Facebook opened its D.C. office when it was five years old — and already worth billions. It routinely hires lots of top-tier, veteran lobbyists, as does Google.“The current lobbying environment is ideal. Many lawmakers still don’t fully grasp the technology. Congress long ago defunded its in-house technology office, which could have taught them.“Facebook reported its 2017 lobbying cost at nearly $12 million. Google spent even more: $18 million. … Some of the money goes to think tanks, where experts can shape policy debates on Capitol Hill. … Then there’s campaign money. …“Facebook’s PAC and employees made political contributions totaling $4.5 million in the 2016 cycle, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics. For Google’s parent company, Alphabet, the total was nearly $8 million.” Sharelast_img read more

Sensorequipped footballs could help refs and players

first_imgEquipped with a GPS receiver and accelerometer, a football could help refs make calls such as whether the ball was caught before it hit the ground, or if a player had possession before fumbling. Image credit: Andrew Rush/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Citation: Sensor-equipped footballs could help refs and players (2008, December 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-12-sensor-equipped-footballs-refs-players.html Explore further Wimbledon: lawns look lovely, but time to keep off the grass After getting tired of throwing things at the TV during unfair calls, Narasimhan wondered if it would be possible to improve the accuracy of the referees’ decisions by adding sensor technology to the instant replays. She began working on a way to equip the football with a GPS receiver and an accelerometer that could help refs make calls such as whether the ball was caught before it hit the ground, or if a player had possession before fumbling. She has also designed gloves with 15 touch sensors that wirelessly transmit data to a computer. The data can show a player’s grip by sensing which parts of the glove are in contact with ball at any given time, and provide information on how an individual player throws the ball.Narasimhan hopes that the technology will be used for training referees and players, and possibly scouting. She doesn’t intend for the electronics to take any of the fun out of the game.”You’d never want to replace the human referees because they make these calls based on years of experience, and no technology can replace that,” she said. “But in addition to the instant replay, if you had a supplementary system that said this is exactly where the ball landed and where the player stopped with it, you could make these kinds of calls accurately.”Besides being used in games, the technology could be used to help coaches, for instance, when they need to replace a second-string quarterback. Potential replacements could wear the sensor-laden gloves while throwing and running, and coaches could tell how the players react in different situations. “You could have whoever you’re scouting wear these gloves and you could ask, well, does he throw the same way under the same defensive schemes or does he run the same way and make the same kind of cuts as a terrific running back does?” she said.The technology still needs improvement to be useful, though. The current prototype transmits information just once a second and is only accurate to within 30 feet. Narasimhan and her students are working on a newer prototype that can transmit information four times per second and combine data from fixed GPS receivers near the field for greater accuracy.Besides the ball and gloves, sensors could one day be added to players’ shoes to measure running stride and patterns, or in shoulder pads to calculate blocking positions and force. Narasimhan hopes to work with a college or pro team to get players’ input on what kind of information would be most helpful for improving their game.via: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Gizmodo© 2008 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — When Dr. Priya Narasimhan moved to Pittsburgh seven years ago, she fell in love with the people, the city, and the Pittsburgh Steelers. Although the Carnegie Mellon computer engineering professor grew up in India and Africa, she became passionate about the American sport of football, including its bad calls and referees’ human error.last_img read more

Bromium sets up business net around malware Update

first_img PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen © 2012 Phys.org www.bromium.com/www.bromium.com/misc/Bromium_vSentry_WP.pdf (Phys.org)—Bromium has announced the availability of a product intended to make a significant difference in how enterprises cope with relentless attempts to attack their systems with malware, burdening IT departments and preventing employees from carrying on business as usual. The only headaches inherent in Bromium’s product might beset rival security companies that do business in anti-virus software and data protection. Ian Pratt, Bromium co-founder, said, “Traditional security products rely on being able to look at any document in advance and decide whether it contains malicious code which can be identified by `signatures’ already reported…. Yes, a bit like after the horse has bolted.” Malware can take ugly leap forward to virtual machines Citation: Bromium sets up business net around malware (Update) (2012, September 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-bromium-net-business-malware.html Bromium’s software product is called vSentry, and the technology approach rests on a micro-virtual machine—an isolated environment— that protects the underlying operating system and whatever content is stored on the machine from malware. The microVM isolates attacks, trapping malware and analyzing it so that IT staff can explore it further without interruption to employee computer users. According to its designers, a PC user at a company would not be aware that it is installed. The machine tracks employee use of the web. All the data from a website visit is contained. vSentry places each document into this virtual machine. If someone clicks a bad link, the micro-VM will keep it until the IT administrator views and disposes of it. The virus cannot escape from the safety shield of this environment to enter the actual computer. The company’s target is the enterprise customer, because that is where the opportunity lies for the virtual machine approach. vSentry is licensed per-user, enterprise wide, and priced according to volume. Security teams may have ample expertise but they cannot actively block attacks they never saw before. The vSentry appeal is not just that employees can be free to work without fear of bringing up viruses, but that the information captured for the dashboard provides information on the malware attempts. The company says that the information via vSentry’s “Live Attack Visualization and Analysis” (LAVA) feature delivers information about the attack’s origin, techniques, and targets.Rather than reducing the need for a security team, the product gives them more power to work on security protection for the business with better success. Bromium says its LAVA delivers high malware detection rates. Micro-VM analysis can look at forms of attack that include rootkits and bootkits and generate signatures for otherwise undetectable attacks. The idea is that an enterprise security team can in turn update security mechanisms or fortify defenses of specific attack targets. The drawback is that the product only works on Windows. Platform requirements in full are given as Intel i3, i5, i7 processor; 4 GB RAM; Windows 7 64-bit. It does not run on Macs and it does not run on ARM architectures.center_img More information: Credit: Bromium This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Play Credit: Bromium Some outsiders say that this represents lost opportunity for the company as, on the enterprise level, more employees are using iPads and mobile devices to do their work. Nonetheless, the company co-founders have told reporters that in time wider support is in the works including versions for Windows 8 and Mac OSX. This week’s product announcement had some sites voicing superlatives, implying the software can do a lot to mitigate the business angst and costs of computer malware.last_img