Tag: 上海龙凤1314

Loan will be a mortgage on Guyana’s future – economic advisor

first_imgUS$900M loan…warns Govt over staking debt on oil sectorThe recent US$900 million loan taken by the Government from the Islamic Development Bank (IsDB) is a source of deep concern; as Guyana’s debt portfolio is slated to take a sharp hike.This is according to the Opposition’s economic advisor, Peter Ramsaroop. However, while an agreement has reportedly not yet been inked, he on Friday expressed worry over plans to borrow such huge sums.“It is clear. The Guyana Government has now begun to borrow enormous sums of money based on a promise of oil revenues. Every advisor, including the Leader of the political Opposition, Bharrat Jagdeo, has consistently warned this Administration against contracting unsustainable loans based on the promise of an extremely volatile export – crude.”“There is no other reason the Islamic Development Bank would front Guyana US$900 million – a country with a proven track record of the inability to spend farFinance Minister Winston Jordanless in a given year – now, to spend on a work programme to be completed between this year and 2020, seems far-fetched,” he pointed out.For perspective, Ramsroop made reference to the state of the art Skeldon Sugar factory which cost US$100 million.“The Amaila Falls Hydro Electric Project – a project that would have revolutionised this country was projected to cost US$800 million. The David Granger Government railed against this project saying taking on such a high loan and raising the legislative debt ceiling guarantees for Government was excessive and would have been a burden on this nation for ages to come.”It was announced that the IsDB has, for the period 2018 to 2020, committed to providing Guyana with financial and technical assistance to the tune of US$900 million. This, it was made known, would be directed into the country’s key development areas to assist with its plans for continued social and economic development.This disclosure was made by Finance Minister Winston Jordan during his address at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the IsDB Group in Tunisia. According to the Minister, this money will aid Government’s plans in a meaningful way, as it would give direct support to several Government programmes in many developmental areas.Economist Peter Ramsaroop“The Bank fielded a programming mission in December 2017, where a work programme for the three-year period 2018-2020 was formalised. Financing and technical assistance of about US$900 million will be directed to key development areas; including economic infrastructure, rural development, human development, and trade and competitiveness,” the Minister explained.Jordan claimed that Government has been steadfast in its resolve to ensure growth in the economy. That resolve, according to him, resulted in economic growth averaging about three per cent between 2015 and 2017.last_img read more

Pochettino urges Spurs superiors to take risks in transfer market

first_imgTottenham have also spent only a fraction of the hundreds of millions outlaid in the transfer market by the two Manchester clubs to take the top two spots in the league.Instead, Pochettino has worked wonders by developing and improving an extremely talented young squad.However, patience may be wearing thin for some players not earning as much they could elsewhere after it was revealed last month that chairman Daniel Levy saw his own pay last season rise £3.16 million ($4.3 million) to just over £6 million a year.“I think Daniel is going to listen to me. But you know me and sometimes I have some crazy ideas,” said Pochettino.“You need to be brave. In this type of situation, with a club with our unbelievable fans, being brave is the most important, and to take risks.“I think it’s a moment the club needs to take risks and if possible work harder than the previous season to be competitive again.”However, Pochettino’s wishes could be hampered by spiralling costs for the new stadium, reportedly set to hit £1 billion.Outgoing Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger even suggested last week that prized assets like Harry Kane might need to be sold to balance the books in the wake of the stadium move.Wenger was forced to battle to keep Arsenal competitive despite the financial handicap of paying back bank loans and selling a number of his top players following Arsenal’s move from Highbury to the Emirates in 2006.The Frenchman said keeping Arsenal in the Champions League for the following nine years was his “best job” as a manager.“The prices for the stadium have doubled, (but) the transfers of the players have tripled or quadrupled,” said Wenger.“A £10 million player when we built the stadium was huge. Today a guy like Kane, I don’t know for much they can sell him, £100m? So they might get more supply. But they have to face it.”Pochettino has been widely praised for breaking into the top four on a consistent basis, but insists much more needs to be done if he is to lift his first trophy as a coach next season.“I don’t know if the club will be agreeing with me or not, but we are going to talk next week on what we need to do to improve,” said the Argentine.“That is a little bit up to Daniel of course, to the club, to be happy with us, because after four years I think we need to assess that period.“If we want to play and be real contenders for big, big trophies, yes, we need to review a little.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Tottenham’s Mauricio Pochettino has urged chairman Daniel Levy to be “brave” in the transfer market © AFP / Ian KINGTONLONDON, United Kingdom, May 14 – Tottenham Hotspur manager Mauricio Pochettino called on the club’s chairman Daniel Levy to match his ambitions by being “brave” in the transfer market ahead of moving to a new 62,000 capacity stadium.Spurs sealed Champions League football for a third straight season by finishing third in the Premier League despite having reportedly just the sixth highest wage bill behind Manchester City, Manchester United, Chelsea, Arsenal and Liverpool.last_img read more

Freeland shares a dark history lesson with NAFTA partners at trade talks

first_imgWASHINGTON – A book which Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland shared with her U.S. and Mexican colleagues during the last round of NAFTA negotiations, offers a dark message about globalization’s collapse, the rise of nationalism and humanity tumbling into an abyss of death and destruction.She brought three books to an informal book club with peers Robert Lighthizer and Ildefonso Guajardo. Two tell a positive tale of human advancement. The third serves up a bleak historical lesson about the big anti-globalization backlash of the last century.It’s no accident she chose to share “The War That Ended Peace,” Canadian historian Margaret MacMillan’s look at the factors that led to the first of two world wars. Freeland, the book and, in an interview, the book’s author, all cite similarities to today.Freeland and other Canadian officials have been struck by the book’s haunting tale: how a period of fast-paced globalization, prosperity, disruptive technology and increased trade was brutally upended by nationalism, zero-sum logic, a global terrorism panic and glorified militarism, ushering in the most blood-soaked era in history.“(It) documents the speed and ferocity with which reaction can set in, even at times when the world feels safely rooted in a progressive and peaceful era,” Freeland said in response to a question about the book.“As with today, the beginning of the 20th century was marked by unprecedented globalization and growth. The events between the turn of the century and the outbreak of war in 1914 are a useful reminder (of) the fragility of the world order and the pitfalls of protectionism and retreat.”The book starts with the 1900 Paris world’s fair and the Belle Epoque.That world was unprecedentedly interconnected by railways and the telegraph. Trade skyrocketed. Germany and England even traded weapons. People lived longer, healthier lives. New international mechanisms were created to settle disputes. Countries signed arbitration agreements, refined international rules of war and even talked about creating global governance bodies.The book describes a growing belief that war itself was becoming obsolete, quoting one author: “People no (more) believed in the possibility of barbaric relapses … (than) in ghosts and witches’.”But these were also disruptive times.Economies underwent radical transformations and workers left farms for new manufacturing jobs in the cities.Terrorism was rampant. Anarchists had killed, bombed, stabbed and shot a French president, two Spanish prime ministers, an Italian king, a U.S. president, an Austrian empress, a Russian statesman and a Russian royal.MacMillan writes of the militaristic backlash. People fumed about the new softness of European men, responding with military-themed organizations for boys. Politicians increasingly wore uniforms in public.Soft-centrist politicians were booted from power.Classical liberal parties devoted to open markets were demolished, left and right. On the left, by socialists, and on the right by, “chauvinistic nationalist parties… A new breed of politicians was going outside established parliamentary institutions to appeal to popular fears and prejudices and their populism … frequently included anti-Semitism.”MacMillan is thrilled policy-makers might draw lessons from that time. She also credits them for trying to squeeze her 649-page book, and two other books, into busy schedules.“I’m impressed,” MacMillan said in an interview from England.“How they find time to read anything, much less a huge, fat book like mine, I can’t imagine. I wonder if they looked at (Freeland) and thought, ‘What is she doing giving us this enormous book?’…”(But) I always find it reassuring when statesmen do have a sense of history. … It helps them — to give them perspective.”MacMillan cautions that there are no perfect parallels in history, that circumstances change.But she said there are obvious echoes in this anti-globalization, America First, Brexit era — with nationalist politicians complaining about foreigners, international agreements, duty-free imports and global institutions forged after the Second World War.“There are, I think, warning signs,” she said.“There are parallels that should make us at least stop and think.”If policy-makers take away one message from her book, she says, it’s this: The pursuit of narrow self-interest can inspire others to respond in kind and everyone winds up worse off.The other books Freeland shared are more optimistic.She gave colleagues, “Sapiens,” a sweeping history of the human species by Noah Harari, a favoured author of Guajardo’s. The final tome was from prize-winning economist Angus Deaton.In his, “The Great Escape,” the Scottish-American author unleashes an avalanche of data illustrating the good fortune of living today in an era of unprecedented wealth, health and human lifespans.He even argues that growing inequality — within and between countries — is a natural effect of rapid technological change, as people catch up at different paces. He suggests ways to address that inequality, including trade and education, rather than traditional international assistance, which he criticizes.Even MacMillan’s book ends on a slightly optimistic note.After chronicling the tragic decisions that pushed Europe into a canyon of catastrophe, she concludes with four hopeful words: “There are always choices.”last_img read more

Everton is good team and they played well – Benitez

first_imgNewcastle boss Rafa Benitez believes rival Everton is a good team, acknowledging that they played well to a 1-1 draw.Speaking after the match, as quoted by Sky Sports, Benitez said:“We have to give credit to them, they are a good team and they played well. It was not easy to play against our team or break us down. At the end we were looking at getting three points one way or another but one point against a very good team can be fine.”“You cannot forget they have won their last four home games, they did well in the Merseyside derby too.”Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.He continued: “We needed a back three because we have some problems with players being suspended and things like that which we have to manage, and try to be solid.”In March 2016, Newcastle announced Benítez as their manager in an attempt to save the club from relegation.Benítez couldn’t avoid relegation, but had promotion back to the Premier League in 2017, winning the Championship.last_img read more

Threatened by Sprawling Houston Wetlands Will be protected by Oil Companys Gift

first_img 00:00 /01:24 Listen Jerod Foster, Nature ConservancyA prairie that is part of 1,800 acres purchased for conservation To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:center_img Drive south from Houston down highway 288 and you will pass thousands of new homes.But about half-way to the coast, you’ll also pass some of the most environmentally valuable forests, prairies and wetlands anywhere in Texas.“That’s pristine land,” says Steve Pastor.Pastor is president of  BHP Billiton’s oil operations based in Houston. BHP Billiton is an international mining company headquartered in Australia.“Clearly as Houston continues to grow, you’ve got folks moving out to the southwest. We want to make sure we did our part to protect that for future generations,“ Pastor tells News 88.7.To that end, BHP Billiton is giving $8 million to buy 1,800 acres of that pristine land in Brazoria County. It’s a project by the Nature Conservancy, a national land and water conservation group. Laura Huffman is the group’s Texas director.“This is not going to be a preserve that’s closed off. This is going to be a preserve that we want to showcase,“ says Huffman.Jerod Foster, Nature ConservancyThe newly-acquired acreage is part of the Columbia Bottomlands ProjectShe says work is underway to build a pavilion so busloads of kids can see the flora and fauna up close. But it’s just a start. Huffman says they have a goal of securing some 36,000 more acres in the area to ensure the delicate habitat is permanently protected from development. But she says that’ll only happen with more private funding.“This is a large gift (from BHP Billiton) that allowed us to achieve large scale conservation. And that would be the encouragement to other companies, think about this at scale. “The project is officially called the Columbia Bottomlands Project and should be open to the public in about two years. X Sharelast_img read more

Art is all that matters

first_imgIn an initiative to bring the finest works of some renowned artists to an art lover’s disposal, a new group paintings exhibition titled ‘Creative Six’ is being held at the Creativity Art Gallery in the national Capital. The exhibition which began on January 25 will be on till February 15. It features the works of extremely talented artists – Farhad Hussain, Gegorge Martin PJ, Kishore Roy, Krishnendu Poral, Jagmohan Bangani and Tejinder Kanda, will include relief prints, dry pints, collographs and lithographs.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’What happens when you bring six creative minds under the same roof? It is a potpourri of colours, emotions and imagination. Six artists are showcasing their works which are carefully handpicked. The personalities, who are being associated with ‘Creativity Art Gallery’, touch different subjects that will connect with the art lovers. Visual treats are by Tejinder Kanda whose strong strokes come together to form song and dance or depict a scene from around your everyday surroundings. Shekhar Jhamb, director, Creativity Art Gallery expressed his motto very aptly. He said: “The aim of the gallery is not only to bring forward good artists but artists who think differently. We want to imprint these artists in the minds of the masses and help ignite aspiring artists as well. When that happens, I’ll feel I’m on the right track”.WHERE: Creativity Art GalleryWHEN: January 25 to February 15TIME: 11 am to 7 pmlast_img read more

Step to check mental illness in schoolchildren

first_imgKolkata: The West Bengal Commission for Protection of Child Rights will propose the state education department to issue instructions to all the schools to create an additional column in the school dairy where a guardian has to mention the details if his/her child suffers from any mental problems.West Bengal Commission for Protection of Child Rights chairperson Ananya Chatterjee Chakraborti on Tuesday said that they will soon submit the proposal to the education department so that both the private and government aided schools can adopt a new system thereby leaving an extra column in the school dairy where parents can mention if the children are affected with any mental ailments. The patients will have to mention some details as what sort of treatment a child has been undergoing and what medicines a child has been taking. It has often been found that the children suffer from some problems but the school authorities do not have any clues about the mental traits of the students. Chatterjee Chakraborti said that in our country, the mental traits of a child are often ignored as a result these problems remain unaddressed. A proposal would soon be submitted to the education department so that the new system can be introduced in both private and government schools. The school authorities will get to know a student’s mental condition by going through the extra column in the dairy. The school will also be able to assess if a student suffers from mental depression or any psychological problems. It was learnt that the education department will implement the proposal after going through it. The move has been taken after Kritika Pal, a Class X student from a renowned school in the city committed suicide inside the washroom of the school on June 21. The post mortem report confirmed that she died of suffocation and multiple cut injuries were found in her wrist. It became clear to the police after going through her suicide note that she was under some mental pressure but the school authorities were not aware about it.last_img read more

8yearold Tech Mogul Theres an App for That

first_img 2 min read This story appears in the September 2010 issue of . Subscribe » August 23, 2010 Joseph Hudicka needs to make about $999,500 more before he can claim the title of young millionaire, but he’s still light-years ahead of his peers in terms of entrepreneurial success.At the age of 8, Joseph has already joined the ranks of the tech elite: He has developed two applications for the iPhone. Pretty good for a kid who doesn’t even own a mobile phone.Joseph’s first app, Puckz, went on sale in Apple’s App Store in March. The game, which combines elements of chess and ice hockey, evolved from a homemade board game Joseph created three years earlier.”I was getting bored with my other games and wanted to make my own,” he says.The explosive growth of mobile gaming inspired Joseph and his parents, Joseph Sr. and Lora, who live in Flemington, N.J., to translate Puckz to the iPhone platform, tapping mobile solutions partner [x]cube Labs to oversee the software development. Joseph supervised the creative process, suggesting color schemes, layouts and sound effects. And like every creative genius, he laments the technical limitations of the iPhone gaming experience. “I imagined Puckz in 3-D,” he says.Puckz successfully avoided the pitfalls of the notoriously labyrinthine App Store submission process, earning Apple’s approval in just one day. Joseph’s soccer-themed follow-up app, Goalz, spent several weeks in administrative limbo when Apple objected to its use of licensed trademarks. Even after Joseph removed the offending content, Apple still took its sweet time before lending its official endorsement in June. (Joseph’s theory: “Maybe they slept in late and forgot about my app.”)As of the end of June, downloads of Joseph’s two apps numbered nearly 800. After giving Apple its cut, he has netted $489. Joseph’s parents gave him permission to buy an iPhone when his app sales reach the 1,000-download milestone.Despite his early success in the tech world, it may be premature to pin Joseph as a budding entrepreneur. Right now, he’s planning to make his mark as a professional hockey player–or maybe a pro bowler. Either way, life as a software magnate may not be in the cards, because, Joseph says, “I’ve already done that.” Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more