Month: August 2019

Sensorequipped footballs could help refs and players

first_imgEquipped with a GPS receiver and accelerometer, a football could help refs make calls such as whether the ball was caught before it hit the ground, or if a player had possession before fumbling. Image credit: Andrew Rush/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Citation: Sensor-equipped footballs could help refs and players (2008, December 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-12-sensor-equipped-footballs-refs-players.html Explore further Wimbledon: lawns look lovely, but time to keep off the grass After getting tired of throwing things at the TV during unfair calls, Narasimhan wondered if it would be possible to improve the accuracy of the referees’ decisions by adding sensor technology to the instant replays. She began working on a way to equip the football with a GPS receiver and an accelerometer that could help refs make calls such as whether the ball was caught before it hit the ground, or if a player had possession before fumbling. She has also designed gloves with 15 touch sensors that wirelessly transmit data to a computer. The data can show a player’s grip by sensing which parts of the glove are in contact with ball at any given time, and provide information on how an individual player throws the ball.Narasimhan hopes that the technology will be used for training referees and players, and possibly scouting. She doesn’t intend for the electronics to take any of the fun out of the game.”You’d never want to replace the human referees because they make these calls based on years of experience, and no technology can replace that,” she said. “But in addition to the instant replay, if you had a supplementary system that said this is exactly where the ball landed and where the player stopped with it, you could make these kinds of calls accurately.”Besides being used in games, the technology could be used to help coaches, for instance, when they need to replace a second-string quarterback. Potential replacements could wear the sensor-laden gloves while throwing and running, and coaches could tell how the players react in different situations. “You could have whoever you’re scouting wear these gloves and you could ask, well, does he throw the same way under the same defensive schemes or does he run the same way and make the same kind of cuts as a terrific running back does?” she said.The technology still needs improvement to be useful, though. The current prototype transmits information just once a second and is only accurate to within 30 feet. Narasimhan and her students are working on a newer prototype that can transmit information four times per second and combine data from fixed GPS receivers near the field for greater accuracy.Besides the ball and gloves, sensors could one day be added to players’ shoes to measure running stride and patterns, or in shoulder pads to calculate blocking positions and force. Narasimhan hopes to work with a college or pro team to get players’ input on what kind of information would be most helpful for improving their game.via: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Gizmodo© 2008 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — When Dr. Priya Narasimhan moved to Pittsburgh seven years ago, she fell in love with the people, the city, and the Pittsburgh Steelers. Although the Carnegie Mellon computer engineering professor grew up in India and Africa, she became passionate about the American sport of football, including its bad calls and referees’ human error.last_img read more

Bromium sets up business net around malware Update

first_img PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen © 2012 Phys.org www.bromium.com/www.bromium.com/misc/Bromium_vSentry_WP.pdf (Phys.org)—Bromium has announced the availability of a product intended to make a significant difference in how enterprises cope with relentless attempts to attack their systems with malware, burdening IT departments and preventing employees from carrying on business as usual. The only headaches inherent in Bromium’s product might beset rival security companies that do business in anti-virus software and data protection. Ian Pratt, Bromium co-founder, said, “Traditional security products rely on being able to look at any document in advance and decide whether it contains malicious code which can be identified by `signatures’ already reported…. Yes, a bit like after the horse has bolted.” Malware can take ugly leap forward to virtual machines Citation: Bromium sets up business net around malware (Update) (2012, September 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-bromium-net-business-malware.html Bromium’s software product is called vSentry, and the technology approach rests on a micro-virtual machine—an isolated environment— that protects the underlying operating system and whatever content is stored on the machine from malware. The microVM isolates attacks, trapping malware and analyzing it so that IT staff can explore it further without interruption to employee computer users. According to its designers, a PC user at a company would not be aware that it is installed. The machine tracks employee use of the web. All the data from a website visit is contained. vSentry places each document into this virtual machine. If someone clicks a bad link, the micro-VM will keep it until the IT administrator views and disposes of it. The virus cannot escape from the safety shield of this environment to enter the actual computer. The company’s target is the enterprise customer, because that is where the opportunity lies for the virtual machine approach. vSentry is licensed per-user, enterprise wide, and priced according to volume. Security teams may have ample expertise but they cannot actively block attacks they never saw before. The vSentry appeal is not just that employees can be free to work without fear of bringing up viruses, but that the information captured for the dashboard provides information on the malware attempts. The company says that the information via vSentry’s “Live Attack Visualization and Analysis” (LAVA) feature delivers information about the attack’s origin, techniques, and targets.Rather than reducing the need for a security team, the product gives them more power to work on security protection for the business with better success. Bromium says its LAVA delivers high malware detection rates. Micro-VM analysis can look at forms of attack that include rootkits and bootkits and generate signatures for otherwise undetectable attacks. The idea is that an enterprise security team can in turn update security mechanisms or fortify defenses of specific attack targets. The drawback is that the product only works on Windows. Platform requirements in full are given as Intel i3, i5, i7 processor; 4 GB RAM; Windows 7 64-bit. It does not run on Macs and it does not run on ARM architectures.center_img More information: Credit: Bromium This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Play Credit: Bromium Some outsiders say that this represents lost opportunity for the company as, on the enterprise level, more employees are using iPads and mobile devices to do their work. Nonetheless, the company co-founders have told reporters that in time wider support is in the works including versions for Windows 8 and Mac OSX. This week’s product announcement had some sites voicing superlatives, implying the software can do a lot to mitigate the business angst and costs of computer malware.last_img

Scientists discover satellites captured Chelyabinsk meteor debris trail

first_img Asteroid expert says surveillance is key to survival, planning is key to defense (Phys.org) —A team of researchers with members from Colorado State University, the University of Wisconsin and NOAA has found that several satellites orbiting the Earth at the time of the Chelyabinsk meteor explosion captured the debris trail on film. As the team explains in their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the captured images allowed for calculating the trajectory of the meteor and then its orbit. Citation: Scientists discover satellites captured Chelyabinsk meteor debris trail (2013, October 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-scientists-satellites-captured-chelyabinsk-meteor.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2013 Phys.org The Chelyabinsk explosion that occurred in the stratosphere over Russia this past February was a stark reminder of the dangers posed by meteors—the resulting shock wave injured over 1000 people and caused damage across the region. Because of their relatively small size, modern science has still not been able to come up with a way to see such meteors before they strike the earth. The Chelyabinsk meteor was a complete surprise—no one knew of its existence until it exploded. For that reason, scientists continue to look for new tools to help with forecasting. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if American weather satellites had captured the strike and if so, if they might provide any new information.After studying imagery from multiple satellites, the team discovered that several of them had indeed captured images of the debris trail, some just moments after the meteor exploded. Analyzing the images allowed for calculating the trajectory of the meteor and from that, its prior orbit. Scientist’s had already done the same using photographs taken by people in Russia, of course, but because the calculations matched so closely, the researchers were able to confirm that images of satellites can be used to provide accurate data about meteor events that are not recorded in other ways.Calculating trajectories and orbits is important because it’s believed that up to 15 percent of meteors travel in pairs, or even as triplets. If scientists can very quickly calculate the trajectory of a strike, they can look to see if more are coming, possibly saving lives. Also, if meteor detection is built into satellites in the future, they could conceivably report on the actual number and locations of strikes around the world—as things stand now it’s possible that relatively small meteors strike fairly regularly in remote locations or in the ocean and nobody knows its happening.center_img Photograph of meteor trail near Chelyabinsk, Russia on 15 February 2013 at about 9:21 AM local time, with corresponding DMSP satellite image from about 9:25 AM. Credit: Photograph courtesy of Alex Alishevskikh (blog.cyberborean.org/2013/02/16/meteor), satellite image courtesy of Steven D. Miller, Colorado State University. More information: Earth-viewing satellite perspectives on the Chelyabinsk meteor event, PNAS, Published online before print October 21, 2013, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1307965110AbstractLarge meteors (or superbolides [Ceplecha Z, et al. (1999) Meteoroids 1998:37–54]), although rare in recorded history, give sobering testimony to civilization’s inherent vulnerability. A not-so-subtle reminder came on the morning of February 15, 2013, when a large meteoroid hurtled into the Earth’s atmosphere, forming a superbolide near the city of Chelyabinsnk, Russia, ∼1,500 km east of Moscow, Russia [Ivanova MA, et al. (2013) Abstracts of the 76th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society, 5366]. The object exploded in the stratosphere, and the ensuing shock wave blasted the city of Chelyabinsk, damaging structures and injuring hundreds. Details of trajectory are important for determining its specific source, the likelihood of future events, and potential mitigation measures. Earth-viewing environmental satellites can assist in these assessments. Here we examine satellite observations of the Chelyabinsk superbolide debris trail, collected within minutes of its entry. Estimates of trajectory are derived from differential views of the significantly parallax-displaced [e.g., Hasler AF (1981) Bull Am Meteor Soc 52:194–212] debris trail. The 282.7 ± 2.3° azimuth of trajectory, 18.5 ± 3.8° slope to the horizontal, and 17.7 ± 0.5 km/s velocity derived from these satellites agree well with parameters inferred from the wealth of surface-based photographs and amateur videos. More importantly, the results demonstrate the general ability of Earth-viewing satellites to provide valuable insight on trajectory reconstruction in the more likely scenario of sparse or nonexistent surface observations. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore furtherlast_img read more

Researchers find bundled team swimming in ant spermatozoa increases speed

first_imgCataglyphis savignyi. Credit: AntWeb/ Creative Commons Attribution License, Photographer: Ryan Perry A team of researchers at Université Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium has found that desert ants (Cataglyphis savignyi) have a means for binding their spermatozoa into bundles that, by working together as a team, are able to swim faster than individual sperm cells. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the researchers describe how in studying the ant’s sperm under a microscope they were able to identify bundles formed of 50 to 90 sperm cells, forming what appears to look like an octopus with a huge number of appendages. Citation: Researchers find bundled team swimming in ant spermatozoa increases speed (2014, June 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-bundled-team-ant-spermatozoa.html More information: Paper: Team swimming in ant spermatozoa, rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.or … .1098/rsbl.2014.0308 © 2014 Phys.org Sperm cells compete in a never-ending racecenter_img Female desert ants mate promiscuously, that is, they mate with one male after another in quick succession, building up a load of sperm which they then use to fertilize their eggs. While this approach might seem logical to the females, it clearly is cause for problems for the males, each of which are genetically programmed to do their best to pass on their genes. Even more problematic is that the males die shortly after mating, which means, they only get one shot at making sure it’s their sperm that is selected by the female. As a result, the team in Belgium reports, the desert ant has developed a means for speeding up the rush to the queen’s spermatheca—having its sperm cells band together to swim together as a single unit. To help the swimmers stay together and work as a team, their heads are all “glued” together with a cap of sticky protein, creating the impression of a single headed creature with a mass of tails swimming frantically forward.The researchers found that such bundles could swim up to 51 percent faster than individual sperm cells, which in theory should mean more of an individual’s sperm ends up in the female’s spermatheca. The problem of course is that all the other males are using the same technique. Perhaps in the future, the ants will develop a means for adding water squeezed propulsion to the bundles to add even more speed, ala octopi and squid. In the meantime, it appears that with ants the best bundler will be the one that prevails. Journal information: Biology Letters Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Best of Last Week–First image of dark matter web why shoes come

first_img In news from space, a team with Southwest Research Institute discovered evidence for a habitable region within Saturn’s moon Enceladus—its ocean floor. Also, representatives for the Event Horizon Telescope project reported that the group had conducted a joint venture to piece together the first image of a black hole—the team includes astronomers manning a large network of telescopes around the globe, each of whom aimed their sights on a chosen black hole for five nights in a row.In other news, a team at MIT announced that they had developed a device that pulls water from dry air powered only by the sun—even at conditions with just 20 percent humidity. Also, a team at the University of Zurich found that brain stimulation could influence honest behavior—by applying a small jolt of electricity to the brain, the team found they could make volunteers play more honestly in a die-rolling experiment. And a team at UC Berkeley made headlines by developing a shoe-string theory explaining why shoelaces come untied. And a team at the Institute for Integrative Nanosciences in Germany tested sperm as a possible candidate for delivering cancer medications in female patients—by affixing little helmets onto their heads.And finally, if you are someone who suffers from an increased sense of anxiety, you may want to read a report from a team at the University of Illinois. They found a link between brain structure, anxiety and negative bias in healthy adults—they discovered that volunteers with a relatively small inferior frontal cortex were more likely to suffer from anxiety. (ScienceX)—It was another good week for physics as an international team of researchers discovered strange forces acting on nanoparticles, which were related to looking at the Casimir Effect using quantum field theory. Also, a trio of physicists from LSU in the U.S. and Universidad de Valencia in Spain reported on their discovery of hidden aspects of electrodynamics, which they claimed advanced Maxwell’s theory of electromagnetism. And a team at the University of Waterloo captured the first ‘image’ of a dark matter web that connects galaxies—a composite image depicting what the team believes is dark matter exerting a force between multiple galaxies, tying them together. © 2017 ScienceX Researchers capture first ‘image’ of a dark matter web that connects galaxies Dark matter filaments bridge the space between galaxies in this false colour map. The locations of bright galaxies are shown by the white regions and the presence of a dark matter filament bridging the galaxies is shown in red. Credit: S. Epps & M. Hudson / University of Waterloocenter_img Citation: Best of Last Week–First ‘image’ of dark matter web, why shoes come untied and a link between brain structure and anxiety (2017, April 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-04-weekfirst-image-dark-web-untied.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Does psychology have a conflictofinterest problem

first_imgGeneration Z has made Jean Twenge a lot of money. As a psychologist at San Diego State University in California, she studies people born after the mid-1990s, the YouTube-obsessed group that spends much of its time on Instagram, Snapchat and other social-media platforms. Thanks to smartphones and sharing apps, Generation Z has grown up to be more narcissistic, anxious and depressed than older cohorts, she argues. Twenge calls them the ‘iGen’ generation, a name she says she coined. And in 2010, she started a business, iGen Consulting, “to advise companies and organizations on generational differences based on her expertise and research on the topic”. Twenge has “spoken at several large corporations including PepsiCo, McGraw-Hill, nGenera, Nielsen Media, and Bain Consulting”, one of her websites notes. She delivers anything from 20-minute briefings to half-day workshops, and is also available to speak to parents’ groups, non-profit organizations and educational establishments. In e-mail exchanges, she declined to say how much she earns from her advisory work, but fees for star psychologists can easily reach tens of thousands of dollars for a single speech, and possibly much more, several experts told Nature. Twenge’s academic papers don’t mention her paid speeches and consulting. Yet that stands in stark contrast to the conflict-of-interest (COI) guidelines issued by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), an influential organization whose standards have been widely adopted by many medical and some psychology journals. Those guidelines say that such ‘personal fees’ should be declared as potential COIs in research papers because readers should be made aware of any financial interests that they might perceive as potentially influencing the findings.center_img Twenge is not a lone outlier; an analysis for this article found that several well-known academic psychologists do paid speeches and consultancy work and don’t declare them in their research papers. Many editors and psychologists say that this is fine and is standard behaviour. They argue that this kind of income should not count as a COI and that psychology should not be held to the norms of medical science. “Speaking fees and consultancies would not be obvious conflicts of interest, unlike, say, evaluating a drug produced by a company in which one holds stock, since there would not seem to be incentives aligned with making one claim versus another,” says Steven Pinker, a well-known author and psychologist at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who can also be booked for speaking engagements. Read the whole story: Naturelast_img read more

On New Delhis 104th birthday iconic Coronation Park plunges into darkness

first_imgWrapped in fog in day time and wearing a sombre look, Coronation Park, the birthplace of New Delhi was plunged into darkness by sundown on Sunday, the only irony being the day coinciding with the Capital city’s 104th anniversary.The historic ground had hosted one of the grandest imperial Durbar ever in 1911, where King George V and Queen Mary were coronated as the Emperor and Empress of India and the British capital was officially shifted from Calcutta to Delhi. Also Read – Man arrested for making hoax call at IGI airportLocal residents oblivious to the importance of the place, let alone the day, wandered about in the park, while graffiti scrawled up on the iconic Coronation Pillar, that marks the site of the Durbar, only added to the overwhelming irony.“Is December 12 a historic day for Delhi? I don’t know. I was born in the vicinity and have seen this place from my childhood days. We used to play cricket here, and now come here on and off. But, I don’t know what this place is, whose those statues are of and December 12’s importance,” said 17-year-old Aditya Jha, when enquired about the place. Also Read – Disqualified AAP MLA Kapil Mishra, women’s wing chief join BJPThe historic land falling under the DDA, was taken up by Sheila Dikshit regime to be redeveloped as a ‘Coronation Park’, and work was to be completed by 2011, to coincide with New Delhi’s 100th anniversary.But, DDA has been missing several deadlines since then and on Saturday, it added just another to that list.As per the plans, the whole area has been redesigned keeping the Coronation Pillar as nodal point. A majestic statue of King George V, which once adorned the canopy opposite the India Gate stands amid four other statues (of Indian viceroys) placed at the four corners around the obelisk. Masons can be still seen working on several sections, and heaps of earth being piled up at the second entrance gate, while the ticket counter at the main gate is far from ready.“The whole area plunges into darkness after sunset, as the new lampposts, barring a few, have malfunctioned. We have lodged a complaint with the authorities, but they have not been restored yet,” a security guard of the park said.“But, more than the unfinished work, it is the public nuisance caused by young couples at the park which is causing discomfort to local people, especially elders, who now prefer to avoid the place,” he said.All statues except that of Lord Chelsford dissolved into darkness by evening. King George’s iconic statue adorned with his Durbar robe too disappeared after the sunset. Lord Chelmsford’s statue stood there lit up by two bright spotlights, in abject contrast to the darkness around it.INTACH Delhi Convener A G K Menon said, “It was a sad commentary that DDA can’t look after its own asset.” “The bureaucratic inertia that has delayed the project so far, and it continued this year too. The funds to carry forward the project has stopped, the willingness has stopped…I am sad about this whole state of affairs now,” Menon said.Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage has been chosen by the DDA as a consultant for the ambitious project, but continuous delay has dampened its spirit.last_img read more

Art is all that matters

first_imgIn an initiative to bring the finest works of some renowned artists to an art lover’s disposal, a new group paintings exhibition titled ‘Creative Six’ is being held at the Creativity Art Gallery in the national Capital. The exhibition which began on January 25 will be on till February 15. It features the works of extremely talented artists – Farhad Hussain, Gegorge Martin PJ, Kishore Roy, Krishnendu Poral, Jagmohan Bangani and Tejinder Kanda, will include relief prints, dry pints, collographs and lithographs.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’What happens when you bring six creative minds under the same roof? It is a potpourri of colours, emotions and imagination. Six artists are showcasing their works which are carefully handpicked. The personalities, who are being associated with ‘Creativity Art Gallery’, touch different subjects that will connect with the art lovers. Visual treats are by Tejinder Kanda whose strong strokes come together to form song and dance or depict a scene from around your everyday surroundings. Shekhar Jhamb, director, Creativity Art Gallery expressed his motto very aptly. He said: “The aim of the gallery is not only to bring forward good artists but artists who think differently. We want to imprint these artists in the minds of the masses and help ignite aspiring artists as well. When that happens, I’ll feel I’m on the right track”.WHERE: Creativity Art GalleryWHEN: January 25 to February 15TIME: 11 am to 7 pmlast_img read more

Murshidabad looks to boost income of farmers

first_imgKolkata: Murshidabad district administration has taken up a unique initiative to increase the income of the farmers, thereby giving them an opportunity to be economically stronger.The district administration has started buying paddy directly from the farmers. The farmers have started selling their produce at various rice mills designated by the district administration. The initiative has created a platform to ensure that the paddy farmers get better price. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeSenior administrative officials of the district have already held a meeting to spread awareness among the paddy cultivators, about the move made by the state government. The district administration has set a target of buying more paddy this year. It has been learnt that various women involved with the self-help groups in the district would be deployed for the buying and selling of paddy. The administration has been engaging women from various self-help groups at every block of the district. The officials have already held meetings with the rice mill owners, urging them to buy paddy directly from the farmers. The district administration will also keep a tab on the entire exercise. The farmers involved in paddy cultivation throughout the district have been informed to sell their produce directly to the government. A control room will be thrown open soon to disseminate information among the farmers. A rice mill has also been constructed at Berhampore through the initiatives of the district administration, where a huge amount of paddy can be stored. Earlier, the farmers had to sell their produce for lower cost due to scarcity of go-downs in the district. All the mill owners have been asked to buy paddy from the farmers, at a rate that has been fixed by the government.last_img read more

Make your balcony garden more attractive

first_imgPlants are essential when it comes to decorating a small balcony. Avoid using too much floor space of your balcony, do not overcrowd it, says an expert.Below are some smart ideas to have a small outdoor paradise that is full of life.Plants are essential things you’ll need to have to decorate a small balcony. Hang potted plants behind the railings and on the walls.Avoid using too much floor space of your balcony, do not overcrowd it. Instead, devise ways to utilise vertical space to double up your space. It’s the best space savvy solution that will allow you to have more plants in your limited space. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfEast-facing balcony receives almost six hours of sun, often between 8 am and 1 pm, and the major benefit of having such a balcony is that you can save your plants from the harsh afternoon sun.West-facing balcony garden is quite similar to south-facing balcony – here the sun shines at its peak for about six-to-eight hours and except tender shade-loving plants, you can plant almost anything.Themed plant and flower garden are also viral these days. People living in apartments and penthouses prefer to indulge themselves in kitchen gardening and low-space gardening with small pots and planters in their balcony area. Small coloured pots with different shapes and sizes are in trend. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveOne can also place vines and planters in bottles too. Like growing creeper plants like money plant in a bottle will surely use less space and will also enhance the aura of your balcony. Waste bottles of soft drinks can be decorated and painted as per the colour scheme of your interior and can be used to grow such plants.Growing flowers of bright shades and exotic fragrance will surely attract butterflies to your flowerbeds. It will ultimately lead you to defining a budget-friendly butterfly garden in your balcony making it a centre of attraction.last_img read more