ICC World Cup: Hosts ready to roll out their act

first_imgRatnakar Shetty, the 2011 World Cup tournament director, is confident the five venues that are yet to receive a final okay from the International Cricket Council (ICC) will be ready soon to host the matches. Mumbai’s Wankhede Stadium, which will host the final on April 2, is among the venues that are in the last stretch of being completed. But Shetty, who’s also the chief administrative officer of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), says the showpiece venue is just a few days from being ready.”It should be ready in the next 10 days. It’s only some finishing work in the corporate boxes and some other areas that has delayed the work a bit,” Shetty said in an interview with Mail Today. Kolkata’s Eden Gardens is the other venue that is behind the schedule. “It should be match-ready soon,” Shetty assured us. A joint team of the ICC and the BCCI inspected all the 13 venues in November. “One more inspection of three venues in Sri Lanka and of the Wankhede Stadium and Eden Gardens will take place some time in the third week of this month,” Shetty said. The Sri Lankan venues that are up for inspection are the R. Premadasa Stadium in Colombo, Mahinda Rajapaksa International Cricket Stadium in Sooriyawewa (Hambantota), and the Pallekele International Cricket Stadium in Kandy.Shetty exuded confidence.”The preparations are on track. I am not concerned about anything, except that many of the matches being played in the Indian sector don’t feature India,” he said.advertisementAnother issue the tournament director raised was that of ticket prices. “We have urged out state units to keep the ticket prices low,” Shetty said. “They should look at bringing in school and college students so that stadiums are not empty for matches where India is not playing. The tickets for these matches will be priced in such a way that more people can buy them. The ticket rates will be different at different venues,” he added.Continuing on the subject of crowd management, Shetty said, “Crowds come on their own for matches where India is playing because of their passion for the game. When two foreign teams play, the interest level is not the same. We noticed the difference during the Champions League T20 matches. The associations must think of ways in which they can bring the people to the stadiums.” The message that should go around is that there’s a lot to learn from World Cup matches even if India is not playing.last_img

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